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9

You are correct that 佐藤さん is the topic in these sentences, but your understanding that も can be used "when the topic remains the same" is incorrect. The actual usage of も is the opposite - it introduces a new topic (or other element in the sentence) to which the same statement applies. The word to which も is attached should be the only element in the ...


7

Since this is in a formal article, I personally think this is a poorly-written sentence that has a subject-predicate mismatch. It should have been either of the following: このスポーツは、(略)水の力で空中を飛ぶものです。 このスポーツでは、(略)水の力で空中を飛びます。 Japanese is a topic-prominent language, and sometimes このスポーツは空中を飛びます can be perfectly acceptable as an eel sentence, particularly in ...


4

The fact that you translate it in a natural English by "in this sport" doesn't mean that it's the correct way to interpret it. I think you already know it but I can't stress enough how important it is to differentiate "translation" and "interpretation". Translation is basically re-writing something in another language keeping more or less the original ...


4

Yes, your understanding is correct. First, I want to correct the Japanese sentence. 前述の部品のパッケージに亀裂が生じたことは疑いようがありません。 "疑いようがありません" doesn't have to be preceded by "ことは". Appending "こと" in the end of a Japanese sentence is roughly equivalent to putting words "The thing that" or "The fact that" in the beginning of English sentence. It make a sentence a noun. ...


3

When you describe a general fact, a sentence of statement needs some topic parts, in short, "I don't have friends" translates to わたしは ともだちがいない. ("My friend is not here" translates to わたしのともだちは いない as long as it's a general fact.) On the other hand, what's newly discovered i.e "(emergency) My friend is missing!" is expressed without any topics as わたしの ...


3

She confirmed she was going to do "club activities of 調理部" in this morning. But the club members no longer do cooking these days, and they are now virtually 手芸部. (EDIT: This うち is an informal way of saying "our club (or office/team/class/etc)") Therefore, what she is actually going to do in the morning is not 調理 but 手芸. The part after から has been omitted, ...


3

So, first of all, the sentence (私は)月曜日にいつも兄と一緒に食べます。 is grammatically totally fine and would be comprehended in the context you give. This would probably best structurally translate as "I usually/always eat with my brother on Mondays" However, partly because Japanese is a pronoun-drop language, and partly because of the situation -- where the speaker ...


3

くる at the end of the sentence is a subsidiary verb which describes a motion coming toward a "main person". Since this story is written from the first-person view (俺, 僕, ...), this くる probably means ナイフ is coming toward the first person narrator. That is, although "she is motionless", she is at least slowly moving her legs. Nevertheless, as @...


1

でも meaning even/but/however is the て form of the copula です. The て form can allow you to do many things, but the most basic use is that it allows you to join to clauses together. You can think of it as meaning "and." も is the inclusionary particle which you use when you want to say "also" or "in addition too." An example of でも would be 先生でも間違{まちが}います。Even a ...


1

1st sentence: ほかの鳥 thought "よだか are ugly birds!" 2nd sentence: ひばり are not very beautiful, either, but even ひばり thought "We look much better than よだか!" Here ほかの鳥 refers to all birds which are not よだか. ほかの鳥 includes ひばり, which are relatively ugly among ほかの鳥 but are much better than よだか. The topic of the second sentence is ひばり, which is marked with も instead ...


1

No, は is the topic marker (i.e., it marks what the sentence is really about), and contains no connotation of negation/contrast. In your first case, (1) means "I have no friends" and (2) means "My friends aren't here" (literally, "my friends don't exist [here]"). Both are correct, but they have very different meanings. In your second case, (1) and (2) both ...


1

Is について a topic marker too? No. On one hand は has some grammatical function as a topic marker, and on the other hand, について doesn't. But I think, the meaning of について is indeed somewhat close to the interpretation of topic markers. 1)Would it sound weird as a sentence to a native speaker if instead of は there was について in a case like this? Yes. Your ...


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