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14

The quoting particle と (or って) is tenseless, just as the quotation marks " for direct speech (she said "I want to sing"), or that for indirect speech (she said that she wanted to sing) are tenseless. The tense is reflected in the verb that is used with the quoting particle, e.g. ~といいました ~といった ~といっています In your example sentence, the correct tense for ...


13

って is a colloquial particle and has two main functions. Being used as a colloquial topic marker (instead of は or とは), e.g. 人ってすごいよね。 People are awesome. Being used as a quotation marker (instead of と or という), e.g. 変な人って言ってたよ。 She said you are a little weird. 人って言葉は何か変だな。 The word "hito" is kinda weird.


10

When there is no additional constraints imposed by kinsoku or full-justification, this is how 「『捨てる』技術」 is typically typeset (produced by Adobe InDesign 2020, font: 小塚明朝 Pr6N, all characters are zenkaku): That is, brackets are rendered like zenkaku or hankaku depending on the surrounding characters/symbols. In other words, the built-in space is usually 50% ...


8

I think it can be replaced with は and というのは here, as in [2] [1] at this Daijisen definition. According to the 日本語文型辞典, this って indicates a subject, and can be an informal way in speech to state meanings/definitions or to add value/emphasis. When used after nouns and adjectives to state meanings/definitions, this って can correspond with とは. When used after ...


8

(A) 彼女は「笑っているあなたを見ている方がいい」と言った。 (B) 彼女は笑っている俺を見ている方がいいと言った。 (C) 彼女は笑っているあなたを見ている方がいいと言った。 (D) 彼女は「笑っている俺を見ている方がいい」と言った。[×] (A) is a typical 直接話法 (direct speech) sentence, and (B) is a typical 間接話法 (indirect speech) sentence. These are common both in English and Japanese, so they should be easy. (C) is the same as (A) except that it lacks the ...


8

Japanese language doesn't have italics or all-uppercase. Emphasis using square brackets (「」) is natural in Japanese, especially when other means of emphasis (like 傍点 or bolder fonts) is not applicable. For example, when you have to write in plain-text format, something like this is totally natural: 机の上ではなくて、「下」を探してください。 Such usage of square brackets is ...


7

Yes, we use quotation marks (of our own kinds, not yours) for emphasis all the time. The kinds we use are 「」、『』、〈〉、《》、〔〕 and there might possibly be more. Just like the rules regarding punctuations, Japanese is more lenient than English. More is left to your own aesthetic preferences in Japanese. 「」 and 『』 are the ones used most often for emphasis -- ...


7

I think this is a bit tricky. In short: you are getting it right, but in this particular example he doesn't necessarily think it is no longer interesting: his comment was probably made on something that had finished earlier. There's no tense agreement in Japanese, so we can think of these two pairs Robert さんはおもしろいといっています。 -> Robert さんはおもしろいといっていました。 ...


7

豆腐の角に頭をぶつけて死んでしまえ。 Used to say that a person is so stupid (that he would believe this and real find a piece tofu to die). (source) ...の爪の垢を煎じて飲む。 Use the dirt under the nail of ( some expertise ) as a drug, (you'll get some of his talent). (source) 名人の爪の垢を煎じて飲めば少しは腕が上がるだろうに It'll be hard to make any sense out of them if you see them alone. I'd ...


7

It's not redundant to use ただ (or たった etc.) and だけ (or ばかり, のみ etc.) together. It's perfectly natural to say, for example: 「ただ広いだけの庭」 「ただ一人だけ生き残る」 「ただ笑うばかりだ」 「たった一度会っただけだ」 (Examples taken from 明鏡国語辞典) ただ一つだけ守りたいものを最後まで守り通せばいい。 Wouldn't either ただ or だけ have been sufficient alone? Yes, you could rephrase your sentence like this, without ...


6

It's probably 灯{とう}台{だい}下{もと}暗{くら}し, meaning we tend to overlook what is right under our nose. http://kotowaza-allguide.com/to/toudaimotokurashi.html


6

「俺{おれ}のことは、みんなと同{おな}じように親父{おやじ}とでも呼{よ}んでくれや。親父のように強{つよ}くたくましく頼{たよ}りになるってな。」 Is the speaker quoting what other people have said about him? From only the two sentences provided, one could not know for certain whether others have actually said to the speaker「You are 親父のように強くたくましく頼りになる。」. All that can be safely concluded is that the speaker would like ...


5

It's quite the equivalent of "you know" in colloquial English. One's favourite song, you know, it seems never to change. As such, it's quite a theme particle, as @cypher mentioned.


5

I think 電撃 is not so strange as a translated material, but anyway... I'm afraid I don't know the standard way to assert your translation of a certain expression is correct without disclosing the original English phrase. Something like (この部分は原文を直訳したもの) might work, but that's annoying and uncommon. In general, it's a common practice to specify the original ...


5

Do you know the と particle (aka the quotative particle)? When you quote someone's statement, you need to use と instead of を or こと. This sentence should at least be: 皆さん彼女はきれいだから賢くないと話した。 This still sounds unnatural because 皆さん is a fairly polite and formal word, whereas 話した is not polite and the content of the talk itself is not polite. This is a problem ...


5

The omitted verb is a bit different from what you have in mind: 世間では警察も無能、Lも無能と思われている。 In the society, it is thought that both the police and L are incompetent. Note that I used the passive form here. The sentence is not saying "society thinks ~" with the society as the subject. で here is a simple location marker, "in the society" (or "in the public ...


5

There is no typo. You need to notice there is one big sentence with two embedded (or in-lined) example sentences. An English equivalent is something like this. As for ささやく, there are both intransitive and transitive usages. You can use it as a transitive verb like: 「大蒜の神さまです」 と彼女はうやうやしくささやいた。 ...and you can also use it as an ...


5

会う約束をした友達から乗っている電車が止まっているというメールが来た。 This という means "saying that" and is describing the contents of the メール. The main part of the sentence is this: 会う約束をした友達からメールが来た。 Xというメール is "an e-mail which says X".


4

Your "sentence": 「"I am flabbergasted."という[意味]{いみ}が[分]{わ}からない。」 is not grammatical and for native speakers to understand it, we would have to guess as to what the speaker/writer is trying to convey. Fortunately, the guessing part is not very hard in this case, but that sentence will still have the listener/reader guessing for a second. For you to use ...


4

「~~というのだ」、「~~というの」、「~~というのか」, etc. added at the end of a question generally functions to emphasize the question itself. By adding one of those phrases, you are expressing the fact that you really want to know the answer because whatever happened that caused you to ask the question perplexes, surprises, shocks you, etc. Thus, you will not attach one of ...


4

In this case, 「けど」≠ "but" Every single word counts in a sentence in any language, but that does not mean that every word needs to or can be translated. 「けど」、「けれど」、「が」、「だが」, etc. are frequently used as conjunctions for making a prefatory remark just before stating the main point. (To be completely honest with you, I find it difficult to believe that ...


4

This の is the same thing with のだ, as in your second option. The third one is partially correct too, since the expression would be literally translated "it is that". The usage of のだ (non-question form of のか) has been a hot topic of debate, despite, or because of its generality among Japanese utterance. The currently widely agreed formulation is that using のだ ...


3

Here it is: 夜{よ}をつめて照{てり}まさりしか夏{なつ}の月{なつ} I found it here (near the bottom), and it seems to have "ka" where what you found says "wa"...I've found other romaji versions with "wa", so I'm not sure which is correct...


3

Punctuation is deceptive. The overall structure is that 「桐原さんが言うには、~てくれ、とのこと。」 surrounds the inner clause 「施設での生活に不慣れな俺のため、彼を専属のサポート役として使う」. It's similar to false word separation as in "eighth grader" and "New Yorkers", which don't mean "the eighth person who grade" and "new people from York". So a more or less literal translation can be given as: What ...


3

◯◯を △△と 言う stands for "to call ◯◯ △△" or "to express ◯◯ as △△ by utterance". In the case of 「どこに住んでるの?」と「い」を言わなかったり, you can regard it as "she saved saying い like どこに住んでるの".


3

You can replace と with と思いながら or と思っていて etc if that helps structure them for you. Though I like the elegant ambiguity of not knowing for certain if he's thinking silently or thinking aloud. I think there is some similarity in English though, when books use italics to represent thoughts without explicitly saying "he thought" or "she thought". Edit, as ...


3

It's, word by word, 色落ち: color loss, しない: (negation of する), か: (questioning particle), なぁ: (sentence ending particle that stands for your inner thought), って: (quotation particle) 思ってる As a whole, " I'm thinking "isn't it going to lose color?" ", in short, "I'm wondering if it loses color". Actually, it implies that you hope it loses color early in this ...


3

The と is quotative. You can parse the sentence in brackets as: 『ルールがなくなると、就職する会社を探すための時間が長くなって、一生懸命勉強できなくなる。』と心配する学生もいます。   The と in ルールがなくなると is conditional. Literally: There are students who worry / Some students worry (saying) "If the rules are abolished, the time to find a company to get a job in will get longer, and I won't be able to study hard." ...


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