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Situation1: My close friends offer me 'something' that of no use for me. So I want to reject it by saying 'I have no need for 'that'.

(Situation 1-1: I want to sound really rude to my close friend as to show that we're really close that we really understand each other)

(Situation 1-2: I want to sound 'rude' to make this 'good friend' stay a bit far away from me, but not destroying the relationship to him)

Situation2: My parents offer me 'something' that of no use for me. So I want to reject it by saying 'I have no need for 'that'.

(Situation 2-1: I don't want to sound rude to my 'half-foster parent' in Japan)

(Situation 2-2: I want to deliberately sound rude to my blood parent)

Situation3: My professor offers me 'something' that I think has no value for the research development. So I want to reject it by saying 'I have no need for 'that'. (Can I just plainly reject him? - Notes: I still need him to help with the project, but I want to convey that his help/assistance doesn't really help with the project's progress)

How to say: "I have no need for 'that'" "Sorry, I don't need that"

Here are some examples I conjured up:

'that' は/が いらない

'that' は/が いらないです

'that' は/が いりません

'that' は/が いいです。

'that' は/が やっぱり 要らない/要りません

'that' は/が 結構です

'that' は/が構いません

1.Is there any 'set-phrase' that conveys in a more polite way or roundabout way in those three situations?

2.Is there any 'set-phrase' that conveys 'the same feeling' without conveying an apology or saying apologetically in those three situations? [ like: すいません/すみません/申し訳ありません]

3.How about this:

その必要はない -> Is this okay? or too rude?

Is there any set-phrase that we can use to include: '以外' for more natural Japanese?

If possible, please explain the nuances for every answer that you give so that we can learn something (especially from the natives) especially the cultural difference of rejecting offers/help from others. Thanks a lot for all your answers!

  • Related: Dismissing an expectation – Flaw Nov 10 '18 at 8:48
  • @Flaw Hi, flaw, I remembered just now: can I use just: 構いません? – Flonne Nov 10 '18 at 8:50
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    I'm not sure. Perhaps you can add 構いません to your question body and wait for the community to respond. Your question is distinct from the linked question in the sense that it implicitly asks for a comparison in degree of politeness. – Flaw Nov 10 '18 at 8:53
  • I add some thoughts that pop up in my mind since I have difficulties rejecting without sound rude to my Japanese friends and some other things, especially I read that Japanese has different 'no' or 'ways' for rejecting a help/assistance. – Flonne Nov 10 '18 at 9:14
  • Still waiting for 2nd or 3rd answers (need more opinion from native Japanese). – Flonne Nov 13 '18 at 17:11
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+50

I'd probably say like the below.

1: いいよ↓

1-1: 要るかよ、そんなもん

1-2: いい

2: いい

2-1: (あっ…)いえ、お気づかいなく

2-2: 要らないよ↓、そんなもん

3: それは…なくても大丈夫です

1.Is there any 'set-phrase' that conveys in a more polite way or roundabout way in those three situations?

Not really. What I associate with "set phrase" is お気持ちは ありがたいですが… or so, but that doesn't really work in your situations.

2.Is there any 'set-phrase' that conveys 'the same feeling' without conveying an apology or saying apologetically in those three situations?

There's not particularly a set-phrase but I don't think my examples contain sense of apology. I'm not sure what do you mean by "the same feeling", but anyway there's not.

その必要はない

It means "you don't have to do that", and is a bit different from what you want.

that' は/が いらない

'that' は/が いらないです

'that' は/が いりません

'that' は/が いいです。

'that' は/が やっぱり 要らない/要りません

Using が is wrong in this case because "that" is what the opponent has offered.

'that' は 結構です

That sounds fairly stiff and distant.

'that' は構いません

It means that you permit the opponent to do something, and doesn't make sense in this case.

  • opponent は試合やゲーム等の状況でしか使いません。ここはthe other person, the offerer, the person offering ~ などを使います。すみません、和英翻訳をチェックする職業病です。 – By137 Nov 14 '18 at 3:55
  • そうですか、ありがとうございます。 – user4092 Nov 16 '18 at 22:58

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