nkjt
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How close was the Japanese writing system from becoming abolished after World War II?
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14 votes

Undoubtedly the book Krazer suggested would make for the most thorough answer, but the Japanese wikipedia article on the 国語審議会 (the Japanese Language Council) has got some interesting details. From ...

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How and when do Japanese children learn kanas and kanji?
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7 votes

The curriculum guidelines for grade one (see 言語事項 section イ) only state that children should be able to read and write hiragana and katakana, and use words that are written in katakana in sentences (e....

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Are the meanings of 煙 and 烟 identical?
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6 votes

Just for reference, according to an online Chinese dictionary 烟 appears to be considered the simplified variant of 煙. I don't think that the right-hand components have anything to do with the ...

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Multiple onyomi
1 votes

Occasionally (I'm not sure how common it is) there are kanji for which the different on-readings relate to different sets of meanings. An example is 日; in a Japanese kanji dictionary it is shown ...

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How is Japanese regulated by the Japanese government and any other organizations?
7 votes

文化庁 also publish guidelines on okurigana, the writing of gairaigo, and the use of romaji. Those can be seen here. Other documents here include guidelines on the use of punctuation, iteration marks, ...

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Why was both katakana and hiragana created?
7 votes

As I understand the Japanese wikipedia articles: Hiragana and katakana were both developed from 万葉仮名【まんようがな】, itself a phonetic script using kanji for their readings. For hiragana, there was an ...

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Analyzing sentences like 日本がピンチだ and 明日は雨だ
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6 votes

Perhaps part of the solution is the dropping of words assumed from context? 明日は雨だ → 明日(の天気)は雨だ You could consider this as a type of sentence known as "ウナギ文". http://www.sf.airnet.ne.jp/~ts/...

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Evil twins and other tropes
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9 votes

The word "trope" didn't originally apply to stock characters/plot elements in the way that it is now used in TV Tropes; this is a relatively new (as in past 50 years) usage of the word. This ...

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Fun with synonyms - "freeze"
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5 votes

I would agree with your general description: 凍る is physical freezing - usually of water or other liquid - or freezing cold. It is more objective (you can measure a freezing point). Exception: when ...

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Verb volitional form (動詞の意志形) - usage
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3 votes

Note that this isn't just the volitional, which for 呼び求める would be 呼び求めよう, it's the volitional of the potential form, and it's specifically paired with どうして. It is, as you say, a rhetorical question. ...

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How did the ざ in 様{ざま}みろ get the dakuten?
3 votes

According to J-J dictionaries (e.g. 大辞林{だいじりん}), ざま exists as an independent word, although derived from さま, taking a similar meaning with a negative/jeering sort of nuance. Would you count くらい・ぐらい ...

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Clarification of hard to understand Japanese Mahjong rule
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6 votes

一飜縛り【いーはんしばり】: your hand must be worth one han before you can declare a win. 二ハン場、I think, is a reference to 場【ば】ゾロ which is an additional two han given when calculating the score (two han is usual, ...

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Are the names of some food items written in katakana?
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3 votes

Unscientific survey: I looked for きす recipes on Cookpad (cookpad.com). By my count: katakana: 13 hiragana: 8 In my experience in a cooking context when there aren't set rules (e.g. outside something ...

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Is this the denial of a statement, or a statement of denial?
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2 votes

(Possibly this was the original context, and you cut it down for the flashcard? http://ch25oda.kitaguni.tv/e1678763.html ) He is denying "可能性", and 「念頭に全くない」 is quoting the phrasing he used ...

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Are けもの and けだもの different types of beasts, or simply two variants of the same word?
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4 votes

Apparently the reading comes from "毛の物", (as くだもの = 木【く】の物), so both mean "beast" as in "furry mammal" (although I'm sure it will stretch to cover those hairless cats). けだもの has an additional meaning ...

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Is it possible to tell whether a word is kanji or hiragana without reading it?
12 votes

Expanding on my comment, some word types that are likely to be written in kana which haven't been covered so far: Cases where one or more kanji in the compound are considered rare/difficult (for the ...

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Does ところ mean the exact same thing as こと in this sentence?
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4 votes

こと in the sense discussed in the linked question is, as far as I've seen it, only used in the XXのこと form, and it doesn't refer to any one identified part of somebody/their personality. ところ in this ...

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Why is there 丼 {どんぶり} in 丼勘定 {どんぶりかんじょう}?
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8 votes

Judging by the following link, どんぶり in this phrase didn't originally refer to the bowl, but a pocket in the front of an apron, where money was kept: http://gogen-allguide.com/to/donburikanjyou.html ...

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i-adjective specific intensifiers/qualifiers? e.g. 物凄い {ものすごい}
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8 votes

複合形容詞 appears to be the generic term for a compound adjective. http://ir.lib.hiroshima-u.ac.jp/metadb/up/kiyo/AN10281005/Hiroshima-IntStudentCenter-kiyo_16_13.pdf - this article covers the various ...

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