Yang Muye
  • Member for 7 years, 10 months
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structure of 忘れちゃうといけないからメモしといたのにそのメモをなくしちゃった。
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3 votes

I try to figure out the structure of this sentence. but I'm somehow confuse with it 〔〈(忘れちゃう)と、いけない〉から、メモしといた〕のに、そのメモをなくしちゃった is it like this? ...although I noted it already (in order not to ...

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Difference between にさせる vs にする(as in 幸せにさせる vs 幸せにする)
2 votes

The correct one is 幸せにする, because する is usually the causative form of なる/である. But it seems that when the object is a person, させる is often used instead of する as a light verb. うれしくさせたい つらい思いをさせないで ...

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What is the meaning of のか and how does it differ from か?
10 votes

漢字はどう正しく書くのか、どう正しく読むのか、彼らは時々迷います。 See Section 2, いったい~なのか. It is used to show perplexity 参加するのか、参加しないのか、ここではっきり返事しなさい。 See Section 2, いったい~なのか. It is used to show impatience 「白」という漢字はどんな時に「はく」と読むか、...

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Some questions about the use of となる
1 votes

となる does sometimes mean である. But I cannot exactly answer your questions, because I do not know how to use it, either. If you search “となる” in BCCWJ, or weblio you can find many examples. なる is often ...

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Random meaning of 結ぶ
5 votes

I checked an Old Chinese corpus. The Kanji 結 was used in the sense of to form an abstract relationship about 2500 years ago, as in 結怨, 結親, 結好, etc. It could also be used intransitively, like 怨結, 恩結, ...

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"naku" suffix and "o" prefix? 保存をお忘れなくですぞ
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5 votes

お忘れなく means 忘れずに or 忘れないで, don't forget. It's the negative form of an honorific form of 忘れる. Here is the definition of お/ご~ある/ない in the dictionary: ある 動詞の連用形や動作性の漢語名詞などに付いて、多く「お…ある」「御(ご)…ある」の形で、...

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Why does 「でならない」 not mean "does not become"?
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6 votes

The て part is a conditional particle, similar to ~してはならない, ~してしかたない, ~してすみません, etc. In 残念でならない, 残念 is the cause of ならない. ならない is the negative form of なる, which is the intransitive verb of なす (to do). ...

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When using もう and まだ does a negative verb always have to be in the (ている) present continuous form?
5 votes

As far as I know, まだ~していない is the norm and まだ~しない is also possible for many non-durative intransitive verbs, such as まだ来ない, 届かない, 終わらない, etc. There may be some subtle differences, e.g. していない may ...

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Why doesn't 分かる have a potential form?
6 votes

As pointed out in other answers, わかる is etymologically an potential/intransitive/passive verb of わける/わく. Then there are two questions: why cannot potential/passive/intransitive verbs have potential ...

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Do 形容詞 have a 未然形 in Classical Japanese?
3 votes

The use of the 未然形 is quite limited. As 形容詞 don't conjugate like verbs, it's hard to say they have the 未然形. But as far as I know, there are several theories claiming 形容詞 do have 未然形: く is the 未然形. ~...

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What does it mean when この is in front of a personal pronoun?
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12 votes

I think この usually implies some quality of “me”. You can translate it as “someone like me”. You can insert some adjectives between この and <first person pronoun>. Usually it sounds proud or ...

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How do I make sense of this use of だったのである?
3 votes

It is a parallel rephrasing. 花の美しさという(ように→ような)言い方も乏しく、したがって抽象観念によって美しいものをとらえようとする言い方も乏しく、したがってそのような考え方もほとんどなかった。 To make the sentence clearer, we can move 言い方も乏しく、したがって to front, delete redundant ...

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Why do 為る【する】 and 為す【なす】 use the same kanji as 為【ため】?
6 votes

Conventions: I will use 漢字 to represent Chinese words, and かな or [振り仮名]{ふりがな} to represent Japanese words. なす/なる and “to make” 為 is related to (and might have been the same as) 偽, “to forge”. Both なす ...

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Translation Help with 思うと and よかった思います
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2 votes

今思うと thinking back now, when I think back When you see phrases like 思うと, 見ると, 振り返ると, 考えると etc., the following sentence is the content or result of the verb. I think the と between よかった and 思います is ...

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Nature Translation
1 votes

I think 自然 sometimes means 川や湖、植物、動物、虫. I still remember a sentence in a famous article: 空気と水、それに土などという自然があって. It's interesting that both sentences explain 自然 by themselves. たくさんの川や湖、植物、動物、虫など(=)...

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S1 と S2 conditional S2 being in past tense
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3 votes

ごんは、家に着いた (then what happened?) すると、ウナギを家の外に置いて、言いました。 と puts a little more emphasis on what happens next. It makes your narration sound vivid. It can also imply some kind of relation between two ...

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What is the difference between んじゃない and んだ?
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11 votes

のだ at the end of a sentence is usually what you called “explanation modality”. (whether it's explanation or not.) のではない is often used to make a partial negative statement. This may be a over-...

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When is it acceptable to use "Newspaper grammar"?
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5 votes

I moved my original comments to this answer because it may contain some helpful information. This is a collection of examples rather than a real answer, because I don't know when and how to omit da, ...

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Difference in nuance between 頂ければと思います, 頂けませんか, and 頂きたいんですけども
3 votes

Chocolate's comment and Kokoroatari's answer explains most things. I think the etymology itself might explain something. 頂ければ(幸いだ/大変有難い)と思います I would (appreciate it) if you could ... れば sounds ...

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How to hear the difference between て and で, た and だ, か and が, etc.?
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9 votes

Because Chinese doesn't have voiced consonants. In Chinese, voiced /b/d/g/ are just variants of their voiceless counterparts. So you can't hear the difference between voiced sounds and voiceless ...

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Why 罪人=犯罪者のこと、not just 犯罪者?
4 votes

I think there is little difference between 犯罪者のこと and 犯罪者. I think user54609's explanation is nice. 罪人:犯罪者のこと basically means 罪人は犯罪者のことだ, 罪人は犯罪者のことを指す or 犯罪者のことを罪人という. You explain 罪人 by rephrasing ...

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What's the etymology and/or reasoning behind 目撃?
2 votes

目 means 目で, with eyes. The kanji 撃 sometimes means to hit, to touch, or to reach without hindrance, which is etymologically similar to the 届ける part in 見届ける, つける part in 見つける, etc. But the original ...

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How should I choose between [知]{し}る and わかる?
1 votes

I would like to approach this question from a purely grammatical aspect. 知る is a transitive verb. 分かる is historically the intransitive verb of 分ける. Just like most intransitive verbs, it can function ...

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When to use 〜す verbs or their する verb counterparts
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4 votes

I've been waiting for an answer, but no one has answered yet. So I just put what I know here. Generally speaking, verbs that take the form [one kanji + する] are highly irregular and many of them are ...

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Verb volitional form (動詞の意志形) - usage
1 votes

How does the volitional form work in this type of rhetorical question (without a か I might add)? This kind of question often end in volitional form. (~しよう, ~だろう, etc.) か is not absolutely needed if ...

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How can I use できない and しまう? I'd like to apologize for not being able to do something
0 votes

Or is しまう always used with a positive te-form verb? しないでしまう is not common (marginally grammatical). しなくてしまう is extremely rare.

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Use of こそ. What words is it replacing here?
2 votes

AこそB sometimes means B matches A the best or A matches B the best. Both A and B might are something you might already know. When you emphasize the last part, it's often something unusual. When you ...

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What does ~ましょう ~おうmean when you say it to no one
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3 votes

I think ~よう is often used to express a feeling such as you are “thinking”, “considering”, “planing”, “deciding”, “guessing” or something. You say “帰ろう”, “寝よう”, “買おう” to yourself when you are making a ...

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How should we read/translate long sentences that end in a question?
3 votes

I will parse it as this: (1)=一本のバラがそうである (2)=自分が今ここに生きていること (3)=自分や神と言った人間を越えた大きな存在 (4)=無条件で喜ばれ (A)=(1)ように、(2)が(3)に(4)ている This part seems to be the hardest part, it basically means: バラが、...

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Translating “Walk your own path. Let people talk.”
7 votes

I will have a try. 人ノ言ヲ懼レズ、己ノ道ヲ進メ ひとのげんをおそれず、おのれのみちをすすめ or 己ノ道ヲ行キ、人ノ言フニ任セヨ おのれのみちをゆき、ひとのいうにまかせよ There is a saying I love very much, but much harder to understand than my translations, if you are ...

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