xuq01
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  • Japan
Why can't だ be used after an I-adjective?
16 votes

Grammatically speaking, there really are no adjectives in Japanese. i-adjectives are just special verbs. i-adjectives have many of the same inflections as do verbs, and they fulfill a grammatical role ...

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What is the difference between 数学 and 数理?
5 votes

I'll illustrate using examples. The Kyoto University Research Institute of Mathematical Sciences (KURIMS, 京都大学数理解析研究所) is an example of a 数理研究所, and you see their research span many areas. They have ...

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Is かっこいい used to describe men and women?
4 votes

Yesterday I saw a TV program in which one guest (a female singer) described another female singer as かっこいい, so this is a proof that people do use it to describe women. How common? I'll have to leave ...

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Is it always necessary to ask how someone's name is pronounced if you encounter it first in writing?
4 votes

Regarding whether you should ask people about the pronunciation of their names, pretty much yes. With only the kanji, it could actually be very hard to read names correctly. Many names have multiple ...

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Why is 来る spelled with kanji and する is not?
4 votes

する is "to do" and is essentially an auxiliary verb. Auxiliary words are generally not usually written in kanji. However, 来る can be a substantial verb meaning "to come" and is often written in kanji ...

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Why are some country names written in kanji and yet others are written in katakana?
4 votes

The Japanese people weren't as enthusiastic about gairaigo when many early translations were made, so the names were spelled with kanji (just like how country names are translated in Chinese). These ...

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Heuristics for identifying Japanese-origin words (和語)
4 votes

A few rules of thumb to identify kango 漢語 (and thus wago as well) exist: Virtually all i-adjectives (形容詞) and verbs (except for the -する verbs) are wago. Of course, all function words could only be ...

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Do place names often use jinmeiyō kanji and furigana?
3 votes

All reasonably sized JR stations (and AFAIK, all JR East stations) and many private railway (non-JR) stations have Furigana on their 駅名標{えきめいひょう}, or station name signs. For example, this is the sign ...

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Function of であって
3 votes

Yes. であって is simply the て-form of である here.

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I cannot recognize this kanji after my name
3 votes

It's 様{さま}, which means "the honorable". It could be considered a much more respectful equivalent of さん.

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When to use は instead of other particles
2 votes

No, は is the topic marker (i.e., it marks what the sentence is really about), and contains no connotation of negation/contrast. In your first case, (1) means "I have no friends" and (2) means "My ...

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Japanese kanji with different meanings in Chinese
2 votes

The most interesting cases in my opinion is 走{はし}る. In Japanese, you know it means "to run". However, in Mandarin, 走 means "to walk", but in classical Chinese and many modern Chinese dialects (e.g. ...

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What's the definition of "subject" in japanese?
Accepted answer
2 votes

In Japanese, the subject is something that precedes the subject-marker particle が, and is the thing or person described by the predicate. However, the subject is not the most important part of a ...

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What's the verb/verb-phrase used to described having sex(in a way that isn't dirty)?
2 votes

性交{せいこう}"to intercourse" is what I could think of.

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What is the term for a time limited meal at a restaurant?
2 votes

I believe it is 時間制限{じかんせいげん}, which is usually used with regards to all-you-can-eat meals but can be used for other types of restaurants.

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How to properly express my happiness - しあわせになりました。
2 votes

You could say 楽{たの}しい or 嬉{うれ}しい (i.e., 私は楽しい/嬉しい). In addition, you could also say that something which makes you happy is 楽しい (e.g., 楽しい映画 "fun movie"). 幸{しあわ}せ is happiness that's more sublime and ...

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How to pronounce 体?
1 votes

The conjunction けれど and the loanword サラダ (salad) also have adjacent r and d sounds. To practice pronouncing this, simply begin by pronouncing it a bit more slowly but clearly, and then faster. Also, ...

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Usage of 卵 vs. 玉子 when talking about eggs
1 votes

Well, if you're talking about food, chicken/bird eggs (and any egg you could make scrambled eggs with) are 玉子{たまご}. All other eggs, e.g. salmon roe, are 卵{らん} (e.g. fish eggs are 魚卵). And, as the ...

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Use of personal pronouns when talking to different "ranked" people. (In the same conversation)
Accepted answer
1 votes

I believe it is never wrong to be too respectful. Thus, if it was me I would stick to the more humble first-person pronouns to both your friend and your teacher, i.e. I'd address myself as 僕 or 自分. I ...

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How useful is furigana for most adults and teenagers?
1 votes

Unless the write want readers to read the kanji in an unconventional way (e.g., 歳月{とき}) or if the kanji is non-regular use, i.e., 表外字 hyōgaiji (e.g., 蘇{よみがえ}る), there will be absolutely no need for ...

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The use of "ている"
1 votes

According to my understanding, ている/てる could also indicate a continuing state besides indicating a continuous action. For example, "(I) know" is 知っている, because "knowing" is a continuing state. For ...

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Do song lyrics in Japanese typically rhyme?
0 votes

No. There are only five, six, seven or so vowels in Japanese and most syllables are open. There's little point in rhyming. Imagine a person every sentence with あ. That sounds a bit funny, actually. ...

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Which writing system (hiragana, katakana, or kanji) should we use when writing out someone's name?
0 votes

Write Japanese names the way how the person who has that name writes it. If one wants you to write her name as 玲奈 or 麗奈, write it that way. If she doesn't write it with kanji, then write れな. If she ...

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Is "to" optional in this line?
Accepted answer
0 votes

Syntactically, without the と this sentence wouldn't be correct. Without the と, this sentence would have two predicates (正{ただ}しかった and 受{う}け入{い}れていた), and is clearly not syntactical. A sentence should ...

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American use of Japanese naming conventions
0 votes

Even if you are writing your name in katakana, you would do it in the first-last order. For example, Donald Trump would write his name as ドナルド・トランプ.

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The "right" way to write Japanese lyrics
0 votes

From the Japanese songs I've listened to, I belive that you do not need to be that careful about the number of kanas in a line. You can always do two things: Sing the lyrics kana-by-kana or "the ...

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is suki an adjective and a verb?
0 votes

好き is indeed tricky and I was also tricked when I was learning to use this word. 好き is a na-adjective 形容動詞. To be abstract, it means the "quality of being liked", which is different from "likable" (...

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