15

纏 And the caption says: 一回に纏めようと思ったんですが無理でした。 ...and likely to be typeset in AR POP4B.


12

This is 漢文{かんぶん}, a mimicked Classical Chinese. Now few Japanese can write in this style. However, this style is still taught in high schools in Japan. In the mandatory classes, the students do not learn the Chinese pronunciation. Instead, they pronounce the 漢文{かんぶん} sentences as Japanese sentences. They shuffle the characters, put Japanese words ...


10

There are five distinct scripts in that picture, all reflecting forms of the Chinese writing system. From left to right, we have: oracle bone script (甲骨文{こうこつぶん}), bronze script (金文{きんぶん}), seal script (篆文{てんぶん}), and then modern handwriting (traditional and Japanese simplified). Oracle bone script is the earliest attested form of the Chinese script. One ...


10

The cause is most likely that your font setting (of a program or OS) have gone wrong. As far as I can see the said character in the input box looks rendered with a Chinese font. The glyph you see and the intended Japanese one share the same meaning and the same code point in Unicode (Han unification). Thus computers cannot tell which is which binary-wise, ...


9

Indeed, it reads 「アニメ関係{かんけい}の皆様{みなさま}」 ("To all parties involved in animation"). In handwriting, the "simplified" form of the radical 「門」 (called 門構{もんがま}え) shown below is quite often used particularly, but not exclusively, by adults.


9

The kanji and Hiragana part you are asking - 纏め is pronounced "matome," and means to "put together." 纏め is a noun, and its verb form is 纏める.The whole sentence - 一回に纏めようと思ったんですが、無理でした means "I wished to put them (everything) together at once, but I couldn't. 纏 is also known as a decorated pole sign of firefighters' identifying their team name in Edo era. I ...


7

It seems to say (thanks to @brokenheadphones & @Shoko) 手のなる方へ = 手の鳴る方【ほう】へ alluding to 『鬼さんこちら、手のなる方へ』, a phrase used in tag-like game with a blindfolded 鬼 (the person who is "it"). (See 目隠し鬼 on kotobank.jp.) I suppose you roll the die and depending on what comes up you should [blank] dance (踊) sing (唄) drink from the small cup (壹合【いちごう】) drink ...


7

You misread one hiragana. It says こうぐってなる (So, not つ but う.) The comment 「語彙が…」 refers to the fact that the girl is using a lot of onomatopoeic expressions (instead of proper vocabulary) to describe the first bite of the cake. Here こう (sibling of そう、ああ、どう) means "like this". ぐってなる can also be written ぐっとなる and refers to some tight/cuddly/... feeling. ...


7

Handwriting is always harder to read, but I think in your case you miss practice. For me, reading difficult handwriting comes down to recognizing which strokes are used, and based on their number and approximate order, find the corresponding character. I am often stumped by unknown handwritten characters. The most glaring issues with what you've come up so ...


6

作詞{さくし} on its own refers to the act of writing lyrics and not the person. It is being used to credit the lyricist but does not technically have that meaning. Compare it to saying "Lyrics: John Doe" in English. Next you have 作曲{さっきょく}・編曲{へんきょく}, which is composition and arrangement. Last is 歌{うた}, and the singer is 山根{やまね}麻衣{まい}, or Mai Yamane.


6

For the bottom picture, the writing indicates the sizes. From small to large: 壹{いち}合{ごう} Archaic form of modern 壱合, itself the fancy form of 一合. This means "one gō", where a gō is an old unit of volume, equivalent to 180.39ml. Apparently in Chinese, this traditional unit of measure has been rejiggered (pun intended) to equal 100ml. By comparison, the ...


5

It is 室{しつ}, usually "room", but also sometimes used in the meaning "office".


5

Do you have any other context for this character? As suggested in the comment above, it looks like the hiragana character 「れ」. However, depending on the context, it could possibly be a handwritten version of 「水」. I have seen instances where 水 written quickly ended up looking like れ (or check Google Images for 水 草書).


5

It is: 嫌(いや)だ 。 I hate it! https://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/word/en/嫌/#je-4410 It is written in katakana, probably for emphasis.


5

It looks pretty clearly like it's 森口(もりぐち).


4

It's 兵 as in 兵士. Its radical is 八 (はち(がしら)) and apparently not 斤 (おの(づくり)) or 厂 (がんだれ). 7 strokes. http://ja.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E5%85%B5


4

This "オ is not a real Japanese character. There is a set phrase 本日完売 which means "sold out for today", where 完 means "completely" or "thoroughly", but I doubt it's suitable on a T-shirt anyway. 本日 means "today". The remaining elements look pretty meaningless, too, so I guess this was designed by someone who knows neither English nor Japanese. Or maybe ...


4

I believe the first one is (furigana added): 読【よ】み込【こ】みバーグラフ. 数秒【すうびょう】... The second is harder for me to read. Here's my guess: サターンの マルコン みたいな x x x x The サターンのマルコン makes sense given the image. See also Google. That last word is a smudge. It appears to end in シー, possibly ミー. The first two kana are ... ??? Any more context you ...


4

That should be 「目輝」. 「目輝{めかがや}く」, for instance, means "someone's eyes are shining/beaming/sparkling, etc."


4

経済{けいざい} but in 旧字体 (old kanji script system) 經 The 經 also looks like it's a 異体字 (non-standard writing) or in a unique font. 濟


3

You are looking at 粗相(そそう) which would mean "careless mistake".


3

It says 「[陶]{とう}びな [元光作]{げんこうさく}」. That means "Ceramic Hina Dolls Produced by Genkou" The ひ-to-び change is by rendaku. In case anyone is unfamiliar with Hina-Matsuri, Wiki has it.


3

今日{きょう}は帰{かえ}って Kyou ha kaette The radicals are 刀 (in the form 刂), 彐 or 巾.


3

It looks to me like 「彼」. A smart thing to do would be to show us the surrounding characters --- in other words, context.


3

The image is small, but I think it says 核廃棄物処理【かくはいきぶつしょり】 nuclear waste disposal 核 translates to "nuclear", for example 核兵器 "nuclear weapon", etc.


3

旧字体 Old-form  新字体 New-form Source: Just look up 國 or somesuch on Wiktionary.


2

The easiest way is for you as a non-native to learn how to use SKIP codes and then use a dictionary that is sorted by SKIP code. http://www.basic-japanese.com/Hilfsdateien/skipCode.html Even when I went to university in Japan, this was the method they taught non-natives to use. I do not know if that's how the Japanese learn (I don't think so), but that's ...


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