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7

ダルい can indeed mean both "tired" and "tiresome" depending on the context. However, the same thing is true with many other i-adjectives related to emotion, and monolingual dictionaries may not distinguish them explicitly as English speakers might expect. For example, 楽しい means both "is having fun" and "makes you have fun&...


6

This is about the seasonal change of clothing. 出す, in general, means "to put/take out (from inside)". In this context, the sweater is taken out of storage and moved to the stack of clothes worn daily, in accordance with the transition of the seasons. So Two days ago, I brought my first sweater out of storage this year (because it's getting colder)....


6

「イ」is part of the numbering format for legal documents and is used to for subsections. The order is いろは順, and would go: イ、ロ、ハ、ニ、ホ、ヘ、ト... In English this would be "a, b, c..." or maybe "i, ii, iii..." If you read the announcements correctly, is says: ...the benchmark ratio (as determined under 2.3.イ in "Principal Terms and Conditions ...


6

とっさに is semantically more like "without thinking", "instinctively", "instantly" or "reflexively". It's commonly used with an action to protect someone (physically or socially). Examples: 前方に人影が見えたのでとっさにブレーキを踏んだ。 叱られると思い、とっさに嘘をついてしまった。 彼の顔は知っているが、名前はとっさには思い出せなかった。 It's almost never interchangeable with 急に. とっさの means &...


5

The Japanese pronoun choice is quite context-dependent, but I can confidently pinpoint that this おまえ is "a way to address a junior family member". In this sense, it has no particularly masculine or feminine connotation, and is rather regarded as a conservative (or old-fashioned) usage in the present day (the younger generation is less likely to use ...


4

気【き】 ("qi") means something like "energy", "force" or "aura". 怒りの気 usually refers to that dark aura emitted from a mad person. See: Possible meanings for "気を巡らせる" Of course a stone is not aura itself, so we don't usually say 石は怒りの気だ. Instead, we say 石には怒りの気が宿っている or 石には怒りの気が込められている. I don't know why this ...


4

(~に)よる means "depend (on~)". 「XXはYYによる」- "XX depends on YY" So your example means: 「Regarding 後任の総理大臣の選び方, it would depend on 安倍総理大臣がいつまで続けられるか and also いつまでに(後任の総理大臣を)選出しなければならないか」 lit. Regarding how to pick a new prime minister, it would depend on how long Abe can continue and also by when we need to pick (a new prime minister).


3

It's a variant of くださった in nonstandard Tokyo dialect (江戸弁). くださった → くだすった くださって → くだすって なさった → なすった なさって → なすって Few people speak like this in reality today, but I think this is common in samurai dramas, rakugo, and novels from the Meiji era to the early Showa era. くだす is not relevant; the past form of くだす is くだした.


3

This /\ represents くの字点, an old symbol to repeat two or more characters (usually kana). It was used in old Japanese where everything was written vertically, and there is no simple way to reproduce this symbol on browsers. This /\ is an workaround used by 青空文庫 to simulate the くの字点 in horizontal text. It's explained here. 々々 repeats two characters (usually ...


3

Coining new godan verbs (u-verbs) is far from exceptional in modern Japanese, and we have many related questions on this site. What are the principles behind turning foreign language words into verbs?(e.g. ググる and サボる) Characteristics of 'loan word root + る' verbs Can you form verbs from 擬態語 or 擬音語 by adding -る? Meaning and validity of 雪ってる What ...


3

This こられる is the rareru-form of くる, and くる is a subsidiary verb you probably already know. Here, both -てくる means something like "up until now". Difference between -ていく and -てくる Why こられる instead of くる? Although rareru-form is usually a passive-form, it has many uses, one of which is honorific. Meaning of お支払いを希望される方 What is the implicit subject ...


2

Instead of standard guitar tuning (from lowest string to highest, EADGBE), the song she is playing ("Chop Suey," by System of a Down) uses a non-standard tuning (CGCFAD). She is referring to this non-standard tuning as 悪魔のチューニング, or "the devil's tuning." So when she says 悪魔の時間がやってきました it just means "It's time for [that song that ...


2

涙を浮かべる means to tear up or well up with tears so it doesn't have anything to do with dropping. Once you know it is "well up" you can see how the use of 浮かべる isn't so strange. You may also notice that transitive verbs in Japanese can become intransitive verbs in English and vice versa. This exact phrase also has an entry in jisho.org .


2

This is just お茶をお上がりなさい written in a way that reflects the speaker's speech patterns. So your translation is nearly right: "In any case, please have some tea. Or... is it too strong for you?"


1

The phrase you are using, to say that someone is "your person", is essentially an expression in English. Expressions can be difficult to translate directly between languages. I might take a direct approach and say 私には彼女だ which literally says, "For me, it is her". But that doesn't really make sense. You could expand that a little and say ...


1

You're right about 出{い}で; it is the 連用形 of 出{い}づ, meaning "to emerge, to go out, to come out," etc. Here, the 連用形 is used because 出{い}づ is being combined with the auxiliary verb やる. As a verb in its own right, やる has a range of meanings, the most basic and common of which is "to send [something or someone somewhere]." By extension, やる can ...


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