Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
18

Wikipedia has the shortest translation of 'more' button: 他 文A 他 189 on ja.wikipedia (left) and 文A 189 more on en.wikipedia (right) Firefox has a different translation of 'more' menu button: その他 その他 > in Firefox with Japanese language pack (left) and More > in Firefox with English language pack (right) Given the context, such as menu ...


18

Possible options are: 詳細 (literally "detail") その他 (literally "others") もっと見る / さらに見る (literally "see more") もっと読む / さらに読む (literally "read more") もっと/さらに + 見る/読む may be the most literal, and it is suitable as the caption of the button in "manual infinite scroll" UI. But as the caption of the rightmost tab, I feel 詳細 or その他 would look more natural. EDIT: ...


10

Official as opposed to fanfiction/dojin is simply 公式. But do you want to refer to the canonical story line as opposed to that of a spin-off based on an alternative/what-if story? Like "main" Attack on Titan as opposed to Attack on Titan: Junior High, or "main" Dragon Ball as opposed to That Time I Got Reincarnated as Yamcha? In this case, both are 公式, so to ...


9

The closest equivalent would be それとも in both cases. "Or do you want me to (do it)?" could be translated as 「それとも私がやりましょうか?」, while "Or did you not see it?" could be expressed like 「それともまだ見て(い)ないんですか?」 etc.


8

I would say... [私]{わたし}はこうやって[漢字]{かんじ}を[勉強]{べんきょう}します。 Example: ♪ This is the way we sweep the floor So early in the morning 「私たちはこうやって床を掃くのよ 朝早く」 You could also use 「このように / このようにして」(← sounds a bit more formal)「こういうふうに / こういうふうにして」「こんなふうに / こんなふうにして」


8

How about using the verb [行]{ゆ/い}き[詰]{づ}まる, as in: 「ステップ4で行き詰まってしまいました。」 「ステップ4で行き詰まってしまったので、手伝っていただけないでしょうか。」


7

Consider these simpler examples: リンゴは2個です。 The number of apples is two. 参加者は3人です。 The number of participants is three. 「箱の中には何がありますか?」「バナナが2本です。」 "What is in the box?" "Two bananas." Although "Apples are two" makes no sense in English, リンゴは2個です is a perfectly valid way to tell the number of things in Japanese. As you already know, the ...


7

This concept itself is not widely recognized in Japan at least at the moment. Most Japanese people vaguely know that the concept of gender is rapidly changing over the sea, but I have seen mixed reactions to it. There is no guarantee that Japanese people will accept the Western concept of gender in the near future. Here are words used mainly in LGBT ...


7

I believe there is no single-word term for this. There is a word 難読語【なんどくご】 that means "hard-to-read word", but it doesn't mean "being able to understand its meaning". You can say something like 意味は分かるけど読めない. (Even native speakers encounter such examples often!)


6

ズバリ「星図」という言葉があります。小学校の理科の授業で習う言葉です。 https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/星図


6

This is part of 朝礼{ちょうれい} (chourei/chōrei). Here's some blog posts about the practice: https://newsnmylife.wordpress.com/tag/chourei/ http://ameliemarieintokyo.com/en/the-morning-greetings-in-japanese-work-place/ https://clivebgordon.com/2016/04/25/workplace-culture-shock/ Mantra/company values are called 社訓{しゃくん} or 社是{しゃぜ}. The part of 朝礼 that involves ...


6

丸ごと means "whole" and ごと is usually written in kana. By "butterfly" I guess you mean what would be called 鮎のひらき, which means the fish would be "cleaned" (gutted) but skin, bones, head, fins, etc. would not be removed. I guess the store employee was trying to explain to you that you would be served the whole fish, rather than a filet.


6

Are you looking for a medical (psychiatric) term, or are you looking for a word laypeople know? Anyway, candidates include: 白昼夢: "daydream"; a dream seen while awake 夢想(的): "dream; vision"; basically a stiff kango version of 夢 幻覚(的): "hallucination"; a psychiatric term known to laypeople; usually not associated with fantastical elements or decreased ...


5

The word in your pictures is 自愛, but this is probably not the word you want. 自愛 means "to take care of oneself", and it is a word used almost exclusively in the final part of a formal greeting letter. If you want to say "self-love" in some ethical or philosophical contexts, 自己愛 is the normal term. 自己愛 is often associated with narcissism (especially in ...


5

I think the phrase is 末年{まつねん}. According to Goo: 1 人生またはある時代の終わりのころ。また、最後の年。ばつねん。「昭和の末年」 It can be used without the の as well. However, it seems that this phrasing isn't common and both 昭和64年 and 平成元年 are much more common


5

If it's the caption of a button, something like 自動入力 should be used. The closest single-word verb is 埋める (e.g., 空欄を埋める), but it's not a very natural choice when it comes to the auto-filling/autocomplete functionality on computer screen.


5

The kanji is 額{ひたい} (forehead), and the word is 額当て, read ひたいあて. It's a forehead protector made of a metal plate worn on a cloth band. You should be able to find it in your dictionary under the 頁 radical, or with a multi-radical search feature like Janusz mentions above in his comment. If I had to look it up, I would most likely use handwriting lookup. ...


5

The longer one is the normal way to express this idea in everyday speech and writing, but it also means it looks fairly "mundane" to the eyes of native speakers. The shorter one is less common but is still safely understood. Importantly, 七転八起 is a yoji-jukugo, which means it has a certain aesthetic quality. (Also see this.) Generally speaking, yoji-jukugo ...


5

The catch-all term for (proper) judges in the modern Japanese judicial system is 裁判官. There are also 裁判員 ("lay judge / jury") for important cases. Legally speaking, 判事 is a subclass of 裁判官. 判事 roughly refer to 裁判官 who are not 長官 ("chiefs") nor 判事補 ("assistant judges"). For example, Japanese 最高裁判所 (Supreme Court) has fifteen 裁判官's, which consist of one ...


5

You can use 単品【たんぴん】. Perhaps this is the only word you would need in this situation. チーズバーガー、単品で。 単品のチーズバーガーを2つ。


5

They are called お絞り, typically written in Kana as おしぼり. The word お絞り comes from the verb 絞る meaning "to wring", with the honorific prefix お. If you want to be more specific: 布製おしぼり are made from cloth. 紙製おしぼり are made from paper (these are the disposable, plastic packaged ones)


4

I think this would work, but there are several issues here. 「すばらしい」 is literally "wonderful", but it feels a bit too distant/impersonal/flaky to me. There are other words that would semantically satisfy, but I'm not sure how acceptable/correct they are to use when conveying your feelings directly to someone. [素敵]{す・てき}な~ [愛]{まな}~ [愛]{め}でたし~ [愛]{いと}(お)しい~ [...


4

待機{たいき}モーション ... is the common word used to describe idle animations.


4

One way you could say this is how i study kanji is: 私はこの方法{ほうほう}で漢字を勉強します I've bolded the difference between this and your original. Let's analyze how the この方法で works. この means this, 方法 means way/means/method, and で is a particle indicating the method something is done (among other things). Thus, this literally means I, with this method, study kanji. I ...


4

The kanji like 驪 or 闆 seem to be very rare and are unlikely to be known by a common person. You can notice that there are no entries for words containing those kanji, only some place/people names. While a somewhat unusual combination, I think 黒馬主 (kuro uma nushi) will be probably understood (note that it doesn't specify that the horse is male). In general,...


4

To fly is generally translated as 空{そら}(を)飛{と}ぶ (sora wo tobu). This is because 飛ぶ can mean a variety of other things than the English "fly". This can be seen most hilariously in the Japanese translation of the movie title for "Up!": 「カールじいさんの空飛ぶ家」(Kaaru Jii-san no sora tobu ie) Or literally "Grandpa Carl's Flying House" So I would translate "flying ...


4

I don't know if you're specifically looking for 熟語 but we would generally say 目が細い or 細い目 (the phrase 細目 also exists but that's more like "squint") for eastern eyes and 目が丸い or 丸い目 for western eyes (but this is also used for particularly round eastern eyes). I think the issue is that even within the oriental eye type (at least here in Japan) there are ...


3

English fellow has multiple meanings and it's impossible to give a catch-all term. For reference, here's what ALC says: 男、男の子、やつ 〈話〉ボーイフレンド、男友達◆【用法】やや古めかしい表現。 同輩、同期生◆経歴や地位などが同じ人。 仲間、同志◆【用法】やや古めかしい表現。 〔二つのうちの〕片方、片割れ 〔学会や職能団体の〕会員 〔大学や研究所の〕特別研究員、フェロー 〈英〉〔オックスフォード大学などの〕評議員 You can use 同僚 when it's close to "colleague", 同期(生) when the ...


3

"よそよそしい"is a common word! We use it like... 「彼女が大好きなので、気を引くためにわざとよそよそしい態度をした」 「友だちが急によそよそしくなった。嫌われたのかな?」


3

In this context, 補充 is probably the most natural choice. For example you can say ケースにアイスクリームを補充した, アイスクリームの補充を忘れてしまった and so on. If you really need to say the case becomes full of ice cream, you can say something like 補充していっぱいにする, but it's usually unnecessary.


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