34

I think the most common phrase is... [入]{はい}ってます。 ^.^


21

There's the prefix 子{こ}- 'child', sometimes spelled 仔: 猫(ねこ)  →  子猫(こねこ)  'kitten' 牛(うし)  →  子牛(こうし)  'calf' 狐(きつね) →  子狐(こぎつね) 'kit' 羊(ひつじ) →  子羊(こひつじ) 'lamb' 豚(ぶた)  →  子豚(こぶた)  'piglet' 犬(いぬ)  →  子犬(こいぬ)  'pup' 鹿(しか)  →  子鹿(こじか)  'fawn' 馬(うま)  →  子馬(こうま)  'foal' It doesn't work for every word, though. 小鳥{こ・とり} is 'small bird', and for '...


20

The word you are looking for is 「行{ぎょう}」. We say 「ア行」、「カ行」、「サ行」, etc. How could I say "I think the last kana was a 'g—' kana...'? You could say: 「最後{さいご}の文字{もじ}はガ行のかなだったと思{おも}う。」 In case someone is wondering what we call the horizontal rows of kana on that chart, they are called 「段{だん}」. We say 「ア段」、「イ段」, etc.


18

舒适区 is totally unfamiliar to Japanese. I don't even know what the first two kanjis are. Anyway, if you want to emphasize the negative aspect of "comfort zone" and want to say "the place you can't stay forever", a good word for both of your examples is 「ぬるま湯【ゆ】」 (literally "tepid water"). ぬるま湯につかる = stay safe, avoid challenge, lack vitality The trip is ...


18

Your suspicion is leading you down the right path. ドア is in fact a loanword from English. According to Jisho.org, ドア is used in reference to a Western-style door. This is a door that opens on hinges. Before the introduction of Western-style doors, you are also correct to assume that the Japanese had doors as well. These doors would slide on a track. In ...


18

Possible options are: 詳細 (literally "detail") その他 (literally "others") もっと見る / さらに見る (literally "see more") もっと読む / さらに読む (literally "read more") もっと/さらに + 見る/読む may be the most literal, and it is suitable as the caption of the button in "manual infinite scroll" UI. But as the caption of the rightmost tab, I feel 詳細 or その他 would look more natural. EDIT: ...


18

Wikipedia has the shortest translation of 'more' button: 他 文A 他 189 on ja.wikipedia (left) and 文A 189 more on en.wikipedia (right) Firefox has a different translation of 'more' menu button: その他 その他 > in Firefox with Japanese language pack (left) and More > in Firefox with English language pack (right) Given the context, such as menu ...


17

I think it's [熟練者]{じゅくれんしゃ}... Source


17

You can use バグ修正{しゅうせい} to refer to a bug fix, and a release which specifically fixes bugs is a バグ修正{しゅうせい}リリース. There's also 脆弱性{ぜいじゃくせい} which refers to a vulnerability, which would also be addressed with a 修正{しゅうせい}. User naruto points out in the comments that バグフィックス is also common and acceptable. edit: I've been working as a developer in Japan for a ...


16

Yes, the term for this type of kanji is 理義字. 理義字 理義字(りぎじ)は、同じ漢字を2つ、ないし、3つ組み合わせて構成される漢字のこと。また、広く、形態が奇妙な漢字や、面白い形をした漢字のことを指す。 Although it's on Wikipedia, 理義字 is a very rare word, and the authenticity of this word is questioned (see this and this). And the article says that 理義字 in its narrowest sense only include kanji with two or three copies of the ...


14

Unfortunately no word exactly represents only the union of kanji, hiragana and katakana. 漢字: kanji 仮名: kana; hiragana & katakana 字/文字: kanji, kana, punctuation, other written symbols 和字/和文: (typography term) kanji, kana, punctuation, fullwidth Latin letters etc. used in Japanese typesetting (as opposed to 欧文, or ordinary Latin typesetting symbols) I ...


13

ポケットティッシュ is the generic term for those tissue packs. As far as I know, there is no one word for "ポケットティッシュ for promotion". Manufacturers of those tissue packs seem to call them: [販促]{はんそく}用の(ポケット)ティッシュ (販促 = abbreviation for 販売促進 (sales promotion)) [宣伝]{せんでん}用の(ポケット)ティッシュ プロモーション用の(ポケット)ティッシュ Edit: Everyone knows those promotional tissue packs, so in ...


13

I think you might be looking for the word teru teru bōzu. From English Wikipedia: A teru teru bōzu (Japanese: てるてる坊主, lit. "shine shine monk") is a small traditional handmade doll made of white paper or cloth that Japanese farmers began hanging outside of their window by a string. In shape and construction they are essentially identical to ghost dolls, ...


12

I don't think "read between the lines" accurately conveys the intended meaning of 空気{くうき}を読{よ}む. Reading between the lines is usually if you are given a specific phrase, written or spoken, and you are expected to understand an implied, and intended, meaning that is not directly stated. Whereas reading the air, as far as I know, is about understanding a ...


12

You can get a lot of mileage out of prefixing the names of animals with 子【こ】-, which functions as a diminutive. For example, "kitten" is 子猫【こねこ】; "puppy" is 子犬【こいぬ】; "piglet" is 子豚【こぶた】. This also works for foxes - the best way to say "kit" is 子狐【こぎつね】.


12

The word I hear most common for this is: ベテラン. The second one: 経験者{けいけんしゃ}.


12

How about 「[視聴]{しちょう}[回数]{かいすう}」? I think [再生]{さいせい}回数 would also work.


12

静粛に【せいしゅくに】!  or "Be silent!" is the most appropriate answer, I think. (Although it's from a game, 逆転裁判 【ぎゃくてんさいばん】, I don't believe it's far off from the real thing.)


12

This video is a live broadcast of the Diet in Japan. The next line was told by the Speaker of the House to have the members be quiet. (Siikamiika tells us a more clear sound source here.) ご静粛{せいしゅく}に願{ねが}います!


12

The most comon terms would be 「脳内設定{のうないせってい}」 or 「マイ設定」. 「妄想{もうそう}」("delusion") is an old, "regular" word; It does not have the slangy feeling or vives that the two "special" terms above or the English "headcanon" have. You could use 「妄想」 in explaining what a headcanon is, but it could not replace the term all by itself. The word is just too broad and 「...


12

I think 超音波を受ける is casually used, but 超音波検査を受ける might be better. You can also use エコー検査. So how about saying... 「{明日、/明日の}{超音波検査/エコー検査}で、赤ちゃんの性別がわかる。」 「明日、{超音波/エコー}で赤ちゃんの性別がわかる。」 「明日{超音波検査/エコー検査}を受けて、赤ちゃんの性別がわかる。」 On the 24th, we are getting an ultrasound of the baby. 24日に超音波で赤ちゃんの写真をとる。 Your sentence looks good to me. You can also use 超音波写真/...


11

いな is an archaic form of 'no' (sometimes written with kanji as 否). You can still hear it in modern Japanese in a few phrases, like ~か否か ('whether or not ~'). いいな is, of course, いい+な, i.e. 'that's good'.


11

Yes, it is. Other variants are 追, and direct use of the English P.S. The most common format is 追伸 xxxxxx at the very end of the letter after name and date. When handwriting, it is common to indent further lines to match the start of the text, like so: 追伸 xxxxxxxx (line 1)    xxxxxxxx (line 2) These are more style guidelines than rules as sawa ...


11

I think you can try: リンクを開{ひら}く リンクを開{あ}ける リンクをたどる (follow the link) リンクをクリックする (click the link) サイトを訪れる (visit a site) Of course don't forget to conjugate them into the required requesting/commanding forms.


11

You can use ガーデニングする (do gardening) for gardening. ガーデニング is a generally used term in today's Japan. So you can say... 趣味の一つとして、ガーデニングを始めた。 (As one of my hobby, I started gardening.) ガーデニング用品を買う。 (Buy tools for gardening.) 子供と一緒にガーデニングした。(I gardened with my children.) If you don't prefer this word, you can use [園芸]{えんげい}する (do gardening) alternatively. ...


11

Quick answer: ずっと - sustained over long period of time いつも - every time, all the time, etc. Examples: ずっと東京に住んでいます。 (I've lived in Tokyo for a long time.) 東京に出張するときは、いつも「帝国ホテル」に泊まっています。 (I always stay at the Imperial Hotel when I have a business trip to Tokyo.) Hope that helps!


11

This depends on context. At this point I would say macraf's answer (particularly 経験者) is the best (at least in my findings), but if we are indeed talking about skill involved (IE, you can rank someone, like in a game) 中級者 and 上級者 must also be considered. Again, considering the context (perhaps you can give a bit more?) none of these may sound natural.


11

If you just want to say "overrated," 「過大評価」 is the word for it. この役者は過大評価されている。 The antonym is 「過小評価」. 「高評価すぎる」 sounds a bit strange but would be fine it it were 「高く評価されすぎる」. I think 高評価 is used often in context that imply positive impressions, which doesn't match the negative nuance of "overrated." In general, 〜すぎる works for most of the time. You can ...


11

人間界 is very commonly used for this purpose, and I recommend you accept this term unless you really have a good reason. 人間界 just means "the world where humans exist", and everyone understands that there are also other animals, plants and bacteria and so on in 人間界. Another good option is 地上界 (Chijōkai, lit. "the world on the Earth") if your other two worlds ...


11

"To surf the internet" is literally ネットサーフィンする. And I think this is sort of informal. "To browse" is 見る. So ネットを見る is the answer. "Being on the internet" - either one above should be fine. We also say: インターネットに接続{せつぞく}する formal! This could also mean connecting to the internet. インターネットを閲覧{えつらん}する formal! This always means surfing/browsing the ...


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