21

レントゲン is named after the inventor of the X-ray, Wilhelm Röntgen (ウィルヘルム・レントゲン) — who named them X-rays, whence the confusion. A number of words in Japanese medical terminology were adopted from German (a popular example being カルテ from German Karte). I guess it would not be surprising if レントゲン was also imported already as a medical term for X-ray, from ...


12

ひ弱 is usually straightforwardly negative and derogatory. The word sometimes has the implication of "sickly". か弱い often refers to a type of weakness that stirs someone's sympathetic feeling or protective instinct. か弱い is not necessarily negative, and you can even find articles that says か弱い女性はモテる, in which case the nuance is more or less close to that of ...


12

This seems like the kind of question that should be answerable with simple dictionary lookups in English, but it doesn't actually seem to be. Jisho in particular does very little to disambiguate here. Fortunately, monolingual dictionaries are much more helpful. 「呟く」は、小さな声でひとりごとを言う意。聞き手は必要としない。一方、「囁く」は、周囲に聞こえぬよう、相手だけに小さな声で話す意。 「呟く」refers to talking to ...


11

I think the usage of すぎる parallels that of "too much" — usually "too much" means that it's "so much that it's something negative". But colloquially, this can be used for emphasis, as in "so much that it is (almost) too much", meaning "very much" but in a positive (rather than a negative) way. (See also What does できなさすぎる mean?) For example, if you say ...


11

In short, the difference between 鍵 and 鑰 is that you can safely forget the second one unless you prepare for the top level of kanji recognition test. 鍵 (on-reading: ケン) is the normal way to spell かぎ in kanji (and the only one to spell ケン "key" in compounds, such as [鍵盤]{けんばん} "keyboard"). It is a part of Jōyō list, and even the guidelines for Japanese ...


11

Short Answer: お辞儀: a bowing gesture 敬礼: a saluting gesture (this) 礼儀: courtesy; manner 礼: 1) =お辞儀; 2) =礼儀; 3) word of thanks; 4) token of gratitude, favor given in return 会釈: a casual, shallow and silent bow 一礼: a suru-verb, "to bow (once, casually)"; rarely used as a regular noun (船首: the bow of a ship (this)) お辞儀 is a plain term that refers to ...


10

Muryou is more formal and literally means free in the sense of "no charges apply". In your case case muryou is better, as it is less ambiguous. "Tada" also carries the meaning of "only" / "just" and esp if you say "tada no chattosaito" one would more likely interpret it as "this is just a chat site [in the sense if the above sentence continued as "...., not ...


10

Yes, but it has a nuance like "I am tired because I am verb+ing". I think のに appropriates for your sentence such as 一日中家にいるのに疲れる. When I read dictionaries, I noticed that these words "tired", "bored", "weary", "fatigued" are used in order to explain 疲れる、飽きる、うんざりする, so it may be difficult to explain the difference among them by using these English words. ...


9

非常に is much stronger than the other two. It's a formal word that means "very" or "highly". 随分 and 大分 are often interchangeable, and they both roughly mean "fairly", "pretty", "a lot", etc. The difference is that 随分 tends to have a connotation of "unexpectedly" or "more than expected". Because of this, you usually do not use 随分 for something that is ...


8

Such overtones are not a direct function of ている but rather an indirect result of the situation you’d be using the form in. In particular, the ている emphasizes the currentness of the ability to do something, and is used on occasions where you are able to tell(/judge) from the situation at hand whether someone is able to do the thing or not (or reminiscing/...


8

In the weather warning context, 警報 is more critical than 注意報. Currently the Met Agency defines three alert levels: 特別警報, 警報, and 注意報, for each translated by them Emergency Warning, Warning, and Advisory. They are usually painted with purple, red, and yellow colors on a map. Also see: Forecast Services (the JMA site)


8

If you describe physical inclination with those two words, it's like this: Though English "lean" covers both, 偏る tells that something becomes uneven as if its center of gravity is drawing near to one side, while 傾く means that something loses its uprightness in a way getting unstable. 船が傾いたので積んである石炭が偏った。 The ship gave a lurch and the cargo of coal ...


7

Although Sino-Japanese words (aka kango) are technically loanwords, they have been an integral part of the Japanese vocabulary for more than 1000 years. Practically speaking, it's almost impossible to avoid all of them. Some very common kango which have no easy wago equivalent include: 百, 千, 万, ... hundred, thousand, ten thousand... 学校 school 日本語 Japanese (...


7

こっち or こちら as a substitute of I/we can have a tinge of rudeness to it as it is used to emphasize physical or psychological distance. The form こっちはXXX (I am XXX) is usually used to expresse frustration or grievances (こっちは忙しいんだよ!こっちは寝てないんだよ!こっちは大雨なんだよ! etc). E.g.: 明日取りに来いだって?こっちは大雨なんだよ。ふざけんな! こちら is also used frequently to imply "we don't care about ...


7

食べないようにする The ように is the auxiliary (比況・例示・推定の助動詞)「[様]{よう}だ」. It follows the attributive form (連体形) of a verb. It can conjugate to ように, ような, etc. but not to ようと. 食べようとしない The よう is the volitional auxiliary (意志の助動詞)「う・よう」. It follows the imperfective form (未然形) of a verb, and is followed by ~と(する). Compare: The ように is the 比況・例示・推定 auxiliary [様]{よう}だ ...


7

No, adding すぎる to the end of a noun, verb, or adjective does not necessarily imply that being too much of something is bad, though we generally only use it this way colloquially. Some examples: 彼は大人(っぽ)すぎて本当に尊敬するわ。 He's so mature and I really respect him for that. 妻の料理が好きすぎてたまんない! I love my wife's cooking soooo f**king much!! さっきの犬可愛すぎる! That dog we just ...


6

Be careful when translating to/from English because there is some overlap with certain words like these. 誰でも means "anyone" in the sense of "whoever". マラソンに参加する人は誰でもTシャツをもらう → Anyone who/Whoever participates in the marathon will receive a T-shirt MPAAレーティング・システムで「G」とは誰でも見られる作品です → In the MPAA rating system, a "G" (movie) is one that anyone can watch ...


6

We have a word [近況]{きんきょう} for "recent situation". It can be used like this: 近況報告 - catch up, update 近況(を)報告する -- to catch up (on one's life) お互いの近況を報告し合いましょう。 "Let's catch up." (may sound too stiff) 近況を教えて。 "Can you update?" (may sound too direct and impolite, depending on who you say it to) So what would the the proper way to ask "how's your ...


6

What an unreasonable demand! :D But anyway... 鶏肉味の人参だと思って食べて 鶏肉の味がする人参のつもりで食べて ふり and まね only work when someone changes their own behavior to display to others: 警官のまねをする act as if one is (mock/play) a police officer 気づかないふりをする feign that one does not notice and not when you force yourself to feel something.


6

They both describe the same event "something concealed is revealed" and are mostly interchangeable for human activities. The only difference is that 発覚 stands in the outsider's perspective, while 露見 the insider's—that of who wanted to conceal it. However, it does not mean that you cannot use 露見 unless you are the hider themselves. The speaker can ...


6

"料理" isn't used only for 'cooking' but also 'meal'. In case of 'meal' meaning, it focuses on a cooker. That means 'meal' cooked by someone. Let's see the search results of google images. https://www.google.com/search?q=%E6%96%99%E7%90%86&sxsrf=ALeKk034AheUFmBQhcIqS4ibFIc5D_I82g:1589975590745&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=...


6

ノーマル is the simplest and the most common word to refer to this, and there is usually no derogatory implication at all. ノンケ is the second most common word, but it's slangy and argot-like. Although some people who dislike ノーマル may use ストレート intentionally, ストレート is rare in Japanese. If you don't like ノーマル, there are ways to refer to this more euphemistically: ...


6

介護士 are more like a social worker. They generally help the elderly and people with disabilities live normal lives by doing things like bathing them, changing their clothes, making food for them, feeding them, dealing with excrement etc. One place they might work is a retirement home. There is an official certification, 介護福祉士 (Certified Care Worker), but one ...


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