10

マラソン by its own strictly means running 42.195 km, as long as it is used as the name of professional athletic competitions. For example, "10000m走" (10,000 metres) is never マラソン. 長距離走【ちょうきょりそう】 is the generic term which corresponds to "long-distance running" (usually >= 5 km), which of course includes マラソン. When it comes to amateur events or PE classes at ...


6

It means what it says, but the severity of the accusation changes by context, perhaps this is because it is a non-indigenous imported word, although most know what it means, the social context has not been set as a norm, it could be a dead serious accusation, or just said lightly as in saying "stop hitting on me", who says it, and how matter. If you are to ...


6

大辞林 as well as 大辞泉 say レアチーズケーキ [和 rare + cheesecake] so I'll say presumed "rare" until proven otherwise.


5

Thanks to jogloran's suggestion, I did some research on if "Handle Name" is a 和製英語 word. To summarize from these sources: ["Handle Name"]{ハンドルネーム} is thought by many Japanese to be derived from ["Handle"]{ハンドル}. However, since the word "Handle" is so commonly used in Japan to refer to the steering wheel of a vehicle, the word "Name" was also attached to ...


5

タピオカジュース or タピオカティー would be nothing if not 和製英語. I am more familiar with it being called Pearl Milk Tea (パールミルクティー), as the tapioca balls resemble pearls. As it didn't originate in an English-language dominant country, the naming conventions vary. You can call it 'boba', as is common in my home country (introduced through the Asian community), or ...


5

Several dictionaries (大辞林, 大辞泉, 明鏡, 日本大百科全書) list ベビーカー specifically as wasei-eigo from "baby" and "car", e.g. ベビーカー 〔和 baby+car〕 (I also checked 現代カタカナ語辞典 by 旺文社, but this doesn't have an entry for ベビーカー!) Moreover, as @bjorn & @ericfromabeno say in the comments, "carriage" is usually キャリッジ and a loan of "baby carriage" would more likely have been ...


4

Wikipedia「外来語」によると、 外来語とは、日本語における借用語のうち、漢語とそれ以前の借用語を除いたものである。おもに西洋諸言語からの借用であり、 洋語とも呼ばれる。また、カタカナで表記することが多いことからカタカナ語 、横書きで表記する言葉として日本に入ってきたことから横文字とも呼ばれる。 とあるので、「外来語」は「洋語」「カタカナ語」「横文字」とも呼ばれるようです。「和製英語」もこのように呼ばれるかどうかは書かれていませんが、少なくとも「カタカナ語」「横文字」は、「外来語」「和製英語(または和製外来語)」を指して使われていると思います。


4

The oldest confirmed sighting I have for the term in Japanese is a 1972 song. This raises the question of whether the term was introduced to Japan by American soldiers during the Vietnam war, as one comment has pointed out. Even more intriguing is the earliest citation for it on Google Books: the gay poet Royston Ellis's book The Cherry Boy (Turret, 1966), ...


3

I remember in the 90s, at least in casual usage, we most often called them simply ハンドル, and not ハンドルネーム. Though ハンドルネーム was used too, it was more for contexts where ハンドル on its own would be misunderstood. (This is similar to how salsa is sometimes called サルサソース, for people who are not yet familiar with what salsa is, let alone know that salsa means sauce!) ...


3

I haven't seen a lot of those cases in daily life. I feel like people use English in sentences when they want to add some "fanciness" (for some reason people seem to think it's cool to use English). Like you said in the comments, the only places I can think of where English words are used in Japanese sentences are titles in magazines and TV ads. Although it'...


3

Many hits for this word are from Australia and about people who share a room/apartment. For example: オウンキーは1人づつ持たせてもらっているのですが エレベーター操作ができるスワイプキーはシェア。 So, apparently オウンキー means that you don't have to share the key with someone else living in the same place. EDIT: in fact, the term seems to have been borrowed from English (1, 2) and not invented by ...


2

Do you think it reasonable that it was a fixed English expression, referring to consecutive public holidays, which has fallen out of use after the Japanese picked up the term from English? I think "golden week" is perfectly good English and makes some sense when one understands "golden" to be a synonym for "happy, prosperous, peaceful" (e.g. The Free ...


2

There is 和製英語 wasei eigo "Japanese English" for pseudo-English Made in Japan, e.g. アイスキャンディー ice candy "popsicle", etc. Some relevant links wasei-eigo on Japanese.SE 和製英語 on Japanese Wikipedia Wasei-eigo on English Wikipedia List of wasei-eigo on English Wikipedia There are also loanwords of Japanese origin (often hybrids from different languages): 和製外来語


1

Simple really. Handle name is older than User name. Handle name was used extensively in the pre-internet BBS era, as well as the early internet and among HAM radio operators. This is likely a case of an early English moving over to Japanese and then sticking. There was no reason to change it, since the foreign word maps to a concept anyhow. I remember when ...


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