5

I believe the correct answer should be 「書こうにも」. Grammatical sentences are: 「手を怪我してしまった。これでは急ぎの書類を書こうにも書けない。」 「こう毎日レポートや試験に追われていては、国の両親に手紙を書こうにも書けない。」 「書きようにもかけない」 is not correct. The formula is: 「volitional form 書こう + にも + potential negative 書けない」. 書きよう is not the volitional form. It's 書き+[様]{よう}, "way of writing". To use 「書きよう」 you could say: 「~...


4

Do you remember the volitional form (う/よう) also has the sense of invitation or recommendation? For example, 食べよう can mean either "(Now) I'm going to eat" or "Let's eat". So ~ようになりましょう usually just means "Let's be/become ~". But when the subject is clearly "I", it emphasizes the speaker's own will/volition/intention. ...


3

Only #2. When it appears in the reduced form, it is always an auxiliary (it is less frequently a main verb after a te-form anyways). This is similar to "I'll" or "I don't" cases in English, which are never main verbs in those forms. 帰っている = is at home / has been back and stays home 帰ってる = is at home 書いてしまう = has accidentally written / ...


3

However, "食べる", the base verb which means 'to eat', is much more commonly used for the invitation message. No. 食べる is not used as an invitation like ~ましょう/~よう, both of which roughly mean "Let's eat it". The plain form is used in the following situations: To state the speaker's own will 食べる! I'll eat it! As a question to check someone'...


2

The volitional form is also used to make a mild suggestion or draw a vague inference about something (particularly if the verb in question is nonvolitional in nature). なすの花どれでしょう is a question asking, “which of these [flowers] is that of an eggplant?” Depending on the context, the person could be thinking out loud. Or, perhaps someone informed them there was ...


1

This 未然形+む is the same 未然形+む that evolved into the volitional form 未然形+う used in modern Japanese (hint: the meaning changes based on what person your subject is (1st, 2nd, or 3rd)). You can find its uses here. This こそ is being used in a similar sense as in modern Japanese, i.e. to emphasize a particular portion of the sentence. In classical Japanese, こそ ...


1

I don't have enough reputation to comment yet, so I'll just leave this here instead. I think this post will probably answer your question. なんて is being used for emphasis here.


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