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Question 1 ~ますまい is grammatical, but it's already fairly uncommon. It's mainly heard in role languages for stereotypical samurai and pompous/noble elderly people. ~ですまい is ungrammatical, although ~ではありますまい is okay. Question 2 Basically if you used ある for a person, it would sound more or less archaic. ~くありましょう is grammatical, but it's fairly uncommon and ...


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I feel this is a difficult question even to some native speakers... The meaning of the first sentence is "No matter what you are going to find (e.g., in this dungeon), it must be something incredibly dangerous." For this ようと, see: What are the grammar rules behind this clause, 「才能があろうがなかろうが」? and Meaning of volitional passive form So, you are supposed to ...


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A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar (Seiichi Makinko and Michio Tsutsui) has this to say on the subject: When the subject is not the first person, the nonpast form of 思う cannot be used. ... The reason why this is unacceptable is that 思う represents an internal feeling of the speaker alone. Therefore, when the subject is the third person, 思う has to be ...


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In this particular case, the おう(ろう、こう、etc) or まい for a negative indicates a person's intention. So you are correct, in this context it is similar in meaning to ために or ように, although these two are more objective / place less emphasis on the internal thoughts of the person. と + a complex sentence indicates the way in which this intention is related to the ...


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