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13 votes

What is the use of 〜ようとしている?

For reference, the full sentence is from page 153 of the textbook 上級へのとびら, and reads: その上、日本のマンガは欧米人の本の読み方さえ変えようとしている。 Grammar I am used to that grammar construction meaning either "about to ...
rhyaeris's user avatar
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Verb ending in -ん with positive meaning?

That ん isn't a shortening of ぬ, it's a shortening of the auxiliary む. According to Classical Japanese rules, the negative ~ぬ is the 連体形 of ~ず. This means it is used to modify nouns. In particular, ...
Ringil's user avatar
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volitional + nimo 作ろう+にも?

This is an instance of the pattern VようにもBない 作ろう is what is often called the "volitional form" in English. The root verb is 作る [to make]. にも expresses "even though" and when joined to the volitional ...
virmaior's user avatar
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What are the grammar rules behind this clause, 「才能があろうがなかろうが」?

According to 明鏡国語辞典, the が is a conjunctive particle (接続助詞), and it expresses 逆接の仮定条件 (contradictory hypothetical condition? "even if~"/"no matter~~") when attached to the volitional auxiliaries 「う・よう」...
chocolate's user avatar
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10 votes

Why is intentional form used in 「カラオケに行こうと誘われました」?

You should parse it this way: 近所のひとに『カラオケに行こう』と誘われました。 (lit.) I was invited by my neighbor, (saying) "Let's go to Karaoke." ⇒ My neighbor invited me out to Karaoke. / suggested we go to Karaoke. ...
chocolate's user avatar
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What is the difference between ~んとする and ~うとする?

見んと (<見むと) is more literary/archaic and can be more bookish than 見ようと. (You don't say 見らんと) 見んとする (<見むとする) * consists of: み (未然形, imperfective form of 見る) + archaic volitional auxiliary ん (む) +...
chocolate's user avatar
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Why is intentional form used in 「カラオケに行こうと誘われました」?

The form with -ō isn't just for intentions (the intentional mood). It's also for invitations, i.e. an encouragement to do something together (the cohortative mood, like English "let's"). To ...
melissa_boiko's user avatar
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Is the volitional form of i-adjectives often used?

This form is classified as modern 口語 (as opposed to 文語), but it sounds old-fashioned nevertheless. It's not something we hear every day. We mostly see this form in fictional old person's speech (like ...
naruto's user avatar
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「〜てもらおう」の意味は何ですか。

「〜てもらう」 has a basic meaning of "get / make / induce (someone) to do (something)" In the case of わかる, the form 分かってもらう could mean either "make it understood / make you understand (something)" or "make ...
ericfromabeno's user avatar
5 votes

What are the grammar rules behind this clause, 「才能があろうがなかろうが」?

才能があろうがなかろうが - Whether there is talent or not, - Whether I'm talented or not, This is a phrase using the volitional to express a lack of relation. As for the theme, I found a very simple and ...
user20624's user avatar
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だろうと how can I translate it?

This と is the quotative-と. volition/inference + と can be used without any explicit following verb, and it means "thinking ...", "trying ...", "hoping ..." or such. だろう is part of the "quote." ...
naruto's user avatar
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How do you "try" a suru verb? Like "to try to cook"

A suru verb consists of a noun + suru. All conjugation is done on suru. If you want to use the construction -(y)ō to suru, on a suru verb like ryōri suru, you have to find the volitional of suru, ...
Earthliŋ's user avatar
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What is the use of 〜ようとしている?

This ようとする just means "about to do something". Some western manga fans may have already changed their way of reading books, but for now, that's a local phenomenon that has not yet spread to the ...
naruto's user avatar
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What Does the "Volitional" Really Mean?

Same form, different meanings What's referred to as the Volitional Form is also used to express what the speaker imagines "will happen". The Volitional Form usually expresses 意思 (willingness) or ...
sazarando's user avatar
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What's the meaning of 「〜どんなに抵抗しようとも限り…」

The sentence is invalid. That 限り shouldn't be there. Remove it and the sentence becomes grammatical: どんなに抵抗しようとも生きている人はいつかは死ぬ。(However much they may resist, living humans must eventually die.) Or, ...
goldbrick's user avatar
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5 votes

〜ようにする vs 〜ようと思う

I think the key difference between two versions is that the former is passive and somewhat more apologetic and the latter is more proactive. For example, if a doctor tells you to exercise regularly, ...
Kohsuke Kawaguchi's user avatar
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How does "shashin yako" translate to "burn the pictures"?

He's using the volitional form of 焼く which is 焼こう. The volitional form is used to indicate "will" in the general sense and when used in independent clauses, often is translated to "Let's do [something]...
G-Cam's user avatar
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Why is the Volitional form used here and what would change if it was not used?

The volitional form at the end of a sentence doesn’t always refer to a joint action by the speaker and the listener. Under certain circumstances it refers to an action by the speaker alone. One ...
aguijonazo's user avatar
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言おう used here, I dont understand the grammar

You did understand it just fine. 今言おうとしてたよ I was just about to say the same thing -(y)ou to suru is "to be about to" and is appended to the stem of the verb. The form 言いましょう is -(y)ou applied to ...
Earthliŋ's user avatar
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Translation of 歯{は}磨{みが}きしてこよう in Yotsubato!

よし子供はそろそろ寝ようかー 歯磨きしてこよう こよう as far as I know is volitional form of くる but I feel like the second sentence feels more like a command. As you might already know, the auxiliary よう can be used for ...
chocolate's user avatar
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4 votes

How do you "try" a suru verb? Like "to try to cook"

You can simply follow that rule. The volitional form of suru is siyou, so you can say ryouri siyou to suru (料理しようとする). There is nothing wrong if there are two suru's. By the way, the volitional form ...
naruto's user avatar
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Volitional + と without follow-up

I feel this is a difficult question even to some native speakers... The meaning of the first sentence is "No matter what you are going to find (e.g., in this dungeon), it must be something incredibly ...
naruto's user avatar
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Obscure verb forms?

Question 1 ~ますまい is grammatical, but it's already fairly uncommon. It's mainly heard in role languages for stereotypical samurai and pompous/noble elderly people. ~ですまい is ungrammatical, although ~...
naruto's user avatar
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ようになりましょう - what is the volitional doing here?

Do you remember the volitional form (う/よう) also has the sense of invitation or recommendation? For example, 食べよう can mean either "(Now) I'm going to eat" or "Let's eat". So ~...
naruto's user avatar
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What would be the difference between 書こう and 書きよう when used in this sentence?

I believe the correct answer should be 「書こうにも」. Grammatical sentences are: 「手を怪我してしまった。これでは急ぎの書類を書こうにも書けない。」 「こう毎日レポートや試験に追われていては、国の両親に手紙を書こうにも書けない。」 「書きようにもかけない」 is not correct. The formula is: 「...
chocolate's user avatar
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Volitional form describing a noun?

You're right in thinking that 歌声が消えようと means 歌声が消えても. 幾度と~~ようと means 何度~~ても "no matter how many times..." 幾度と想いが途絶えようと means 何度想いが途絶えても. 与えよう春を is an inversion/anastrophe (倒置) of 春を与えよう. ...
chocolate's user avatar
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-てもろうとる is this Kansai Ben [volitional + continuous tense]

務めてもろうとる It's Kansai-ben for 務めてもらっている. (務める+て+もらう+て+いる) In Kansai-ben, people say... もろうて, もろて, (もうて) to mean もらって もろうた, もろた, (もうた) to mean もらった もろうとる, もろとる, もろてる, (もうとる, もうてる) to mean もらっている
chocolate's user avatar
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How should I translate the sentence 僕がかわりに殴ってやろう

やろう is the volitional ("let's..." or "shall we/I?")form of やる. So it's not an imperative, but the speaker is proposing an action. Additionally, -てやる is a less polite form of -てあげる (do an action to ...
Igor Skochinsky's user avatar

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