Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
5

Whether something is durative or instantaneous isn't a property of verbs, but of predicates: 「道を行く」 is durative 「うまく行く」 is durative (as @user4092 nicely pointed out) 「〇〇を買いに行く」 is instantaneous With a durative predicate, you get these interpretations: progressive 仕事は(今)うまく行っている "My job is going well (currently)."         state         /   ...


5

行っています doesn't express an on-going action in the same way that 走っている might be running. The sentence means that the father has gone to buy some fags and hasn't yet returned.


3

One of the functions of the に particle is showing the purpose/goal of an action (動作・作用の目的を表す), ie "買いに行く", so you can replace 行く, but as Chocolate helpfully corrected me in the comments, the way you express this in Japanese changes depending on whether or not the verb expresses movement. If it is a movement verb, such as 行く/来る/帰る, you use the 連用形{れんようけい} ...


3

The correct answer would certainly be 「買{か}いに」. The sentence would make practically no sense with any of the other three phrase choices. So we have: 「父{ちち}は今{いま}、新聞{しんぶん}を買{か}いにいっています。」 What does this sentence mean (and imply) exactly? It is saying: "My father went out some time ago to buy a newspaper and he has not returned yet." The last part ...


2

With verbs of motion, に and へ indicate destination を means 'along (road, river)' or 'across' (going from A to B) で is where you do something (not going anywhere). The latter case has no real change of location, like swimming in a pool. To me this is simply the で for verbs of action (swimming in a pool is an action but does not go anywhere, so in this ...


2

In standard Japanese there are two meanings when a motion verb is put as ている that must be distinguished from context or by addition of other words when you want to be more specific. Furthermore, in standard Japanese, you do not use 来る about yourself when you are "coming" to someone or somewhere, instead you use 行く. For example: Wienerさんの家に行っている。 can ...


2

に(へ)~しに行く means "to go to the place in order to ~ ( to go to the place for the purpose of ~). For example, レストランに食べに行きます( I got to a restaurant to eat). I think 食堂で食べに行きます is unnatural because we don't say place+で+行く. However you can say 毎日昼飯を大学の食堂で食べます, which means "I eat lunch at a refectory in my university ever day.)". I think you understood them ...


2

行っている often means "he has been there" but that doesn't mean you always can't interpret it as "he is going". So, the textbook is wrong in that aspect. [habitual action] ここのところ医者に行っている: I'm going to the doctor these days [on-going action] うまく行っている: It's going well Edit: When you find your father walking the street and you assume 「おっ、タバコ買いに行ってるな」, that 行っている ...


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