11

Does this have some special meaning? No. I've never encountered a dakuten with a special meaning. ... or is it just some sort of printing error? A printing error in this case is unlikely. I think that it has to do with the font that they are using. Just as with English fonts, some characters change slightly, like with the lowercase 'a' in English. ...


10

When there is no additional constraints imposed by kinsoku or full-justification, this is how 「『捨てる』技術」 is typically typeset (produced by Adobe InDesign 2020, font: 小塚明朝 Pr6N, all characters are zenkaku): That is, brackets are rendered like zenkaku or hankaku depending on the surrounding characters/symbols. In other words, the built-in space is usually 50% ...


9

No, this looks horribly odd to me. This is as bad and cryptographic as this: Virtually everyone who is fluent in Japanese will misread this at first sight, although perhaps most will eventually notice what is the intended meaning if her picture were with this. This is how the characters should normally be aligned in case you didn't know: As a design work, ...


9

長音符や小さい「っ」、それから感嘆符をたくさん付ければつけるほど、叫んでいるように見えるぞおおぉぉぉぉぉぉーーーーーーっっっ!!! 具体的な例を知りたいなら、色んなマンガを読んでみるんだああああああぁぁぁぁ〰️〰️〰️〰️〰️〰️〰️ッッッ!!!!! Seriously, try taking a look at some light novel, or a shōnen manga such as Dragon Ball or One Piece. You can use one or more of: exclamation mark long vowel marker (ー) or wavy dash (〰️) small vowels (ぁぃぅぇぉ) small tsu They can be ...


8

This decorative frame can be called 飾り罫 (かざりけい). 飾り罫 can be text-based or not, it means any kind of dingbat-style framing in general.


8

Japanese can be written in two directions. in columns each column is written from top to bottom columns are arranged from right to left in rows [as in English] each row is written from left to right rows are arranged from top to bottom The first is used for most newspapers, books (incl. manga), etc. Individual pages are thus bound on the right and thus, ...


7

As you know, most glyphs in Japanese fonts share the same width, so problems arising from kerning (or variable character widths, broadly speaking) almost never happen in Japanese typography. Well, we can think of some unrealistic examples... hankaku katakana イム (i+mu) looks like kanji 仏 (ほとけ), and hankaku katakana ノレ (no+re) looks like zenkaku katakana ル (ru)...


6

The typeface used in textbooks is called 教科書体 (lit. "textbook typeface") and fonts are designed to be copied as closely as possible. (This is quite different from languages based on the alphabet: there are many different cursive styles taught in schools and textbooks are never typeset in cursive "handwriting" font.) That said, like you observed there are ...


5

It depends on the type of font. Basically Japanese fonts need to be used in vertical writing and horizontal writing, so unlike the alphabet, the space to design one character must be square. When I check the given font, it is a very thick bold type. In order to arrange all of the design of a character ず in a square space given to a single character font, ...


5

As I was randomly browsing through Remembering the Kanji Volume 3, I found what I was looking for. The kana in this book are set in a font in which the height difference between smaller kana like ロ or ハ and larger kana like イ or さ is more accentuated. Additionally, in katakana, there seems to be a baseline and median line running through the characters such ...


4

It's ライラ from フォントワークス (Fontworks), but the example has been kerned tighter. Sample: BONUS As mentioned in comments, this typeface bears an obvious similarity with a preceding font DF金文体, which also is likely to be its source of inspiration. 金文体 is officially introduced as an adaptation of the design seen in inscriptions on an ancient vessel 中山王方壺 to ...


3

Kanji on average fill a roughly square space and tend to be most readable in monospace. So in Japanese typesetting when kanji is the predominant character set, you will usually see a monospace font full of roughly square glyphs. Latin alphabet characters and Arabic numerals look a little odd in this context. Arabic numbers used in this context are also ...


3

Typical main text of a paperback targeted to adults uses a font size between 8 and 9 pt. Most newspapers use 8.6 pt (≒3 mm). In footnotes or such, as small as 5 pt is possible. Websites use larger fonts. Condensed pages like Yahoo! home use 12px (9pt), but most recent sites prefer 16px (12pt) or so for main text. From what I understand, most global websites ...


3

Distinguishing drugs with similar names is a critical problem in Japan, too. Some notorious examples include リピラート (hypolipidemic agent) vs. ソピラート (antiarrhythmic agent), and タキソール vs. タキソテール (both used for chemotherapy). Medical workers are working hard to prevent 取り違え. However, at least in medicine, there is no similar convention which is directly related ...


3

行書体 refers to a style of handwriting, or calligraphy font family simulating such handwriting in general. Not the name of one specific font. You can browse many samples of Japanese 行書体/毛筆体 fonts here: List of 行書体 List of 筆文字 Unfortunately, none of them exactly matches the image you provided. Are you sure this image is actually rendered from a computer '...


3

I think 40 characters per line is a good upper limit. This is how novels are typically typeset on paper. See this image search results for 小説 + 組版. Lines longer than this start to be unfamiliar and difficult to read. If you care for smartphone screens, 30 characters per line should be safer.


3

As Logan mentions in the comments, your sketch seems to be missing the ー (chouonpu). It's important and should not be omitted (though it sometimes happens in informal writing). Note that in vertical writing it is also written vertically.


2

If those vertical bars with a concave outline are supposed to be 「ー」, then this is technically correct if the reader can guess how they should be read. Usually vertical writing is top-to-down and right-to-left, though, so this looks as weird as wr it ing (okay you got the point) like this. Here is an example of how (manga) sound effects are normally ...


1

Typically in Japanese, you don't really encounter spaces, unless you are parsing for someone who is struggling to read. The only exception is romaji, which is typically only used by foreign Japanese learners. The 「」 and 『』 characters, along with a few others like square brackets, round brackets and parenthesis, have a space built into the character. This ...


1

Remember that there's a difference between ゆ and ゅ, つ and っ, etc. If you're using a non-Japanese keyboard your IME input's probably going to be romaji input, so thinking about it in romaji may be the easiest way to learn how to type. The "yu" sound you're hearing in China isn't actually "yu," but rather "chu" (a combination of ち and ゆ) - a sound that's ...


1

Ordinary publications use fonts around 11Q to 16Q big for main text. The unit Q (級) is the standard measure in Japanese typesetting industry, being 1/4 length of a millimeter (Q is from Quarter). Thus 11Q = 2.75mm ~ 7.8pt, 16Q = 4mm ~ 11.4pt. The default font size of MS Word is set to 10.5pt in Japan. Actually, since Japanese characters don't have ascenders ...


1

Part of the reason why kanji are often written larger than kana is because it improves their legibility due to their more complex nature. As a matter of what is considered standard, all characters in Japanese are intended to occupy a box of a set, uniform size. That said, kana have a bit more room for variation when you get into handwriting, especially if ...


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