33

In technical documents or technical news media, the name of a foreign website or company is typically written completely as-is. 米国Microsoft社のWindows 日本語についての質問サイトであるJapanese Language Stack Exchange Mass media for general public (e.g., 読売新聞) usually katakanize foreign proper nouns because many of their readers do not understand English at all: ...


24

Since this is a formal statement, it's better to keep 私の. But people can understand the sentence without it because they know it's your profile. What's worse about your sentence is that your sentence has a number of bad word choices and grammatical errors. 生むています is always ungrammatical. The te-form of 生む is 生んで. There is a subject-predicate mismatch. ...


22

ちんちんかく means 正座をする(sitting straight) in Toyama dialect. However you had better not use it except in Toyama prefecture, because most Japanese people would think it means "to scratch a penis".


22

「にほん で ぼく は しんかんせん を のります。」 is a nice attempt. I would, however, like to address two items here. 「のります」 simply means "will ride". If you want to say "want to ride", you might want to say 「のりたいです」. 「Verb in Continuative Form + たい」 means "to want to [verb]". 「のり」 is the continuative form of 「のる」. The next thing I need to point out is the particle ...


21

's' vs. 'z' 「好き好き」 has two completely different meanings depending on how the second 「好き」 is read. 1) When read 「すきずき」, it is a noun meaning "a matter of taste". This is a "dictionary" word; therefore, it is written as 「好き好き」 99% of the time. The well-known saying "There is no accounting for tastes." is thus translated to 「蓼{たで}食{く}う虫{むし}も好{す}き好{ず}き」 ...


19

「先{さき}」 here means "the future", "the future events/developments", etc. 「先が気になる」 therefore means "(I am) curious about the future develpments". 「さき{HL}」 refers to a past event. 「先の国会{こっかい}」 ("the last national assembly") 「さき{LH}」 refers to a future event. 「先が気になる」 Native speakers would never say 「先が気になる」 to refer to a past event. We do say, however, 「...


18

今日という日 (literally "the day called today") is just an emphatic version of "today", or "this very day". This expression is commonly used in formal greetings and poems. (I tried jisho.org but got nothing related to "everyday". How did you come up with "everyday"?)


18

「コ」 is short for 「コーン」 ("corn") here. This type of shortening is very common in Japanese when the word would get too long without it..


18

「~~だけ + は + Verb + ない」 is the pattern you will need to learn as it is commonly used. It is an expression that describes the single or very few exceptions to a phenomenon. It means: "Someone [Verb] everything but/except ~~." Thus, 「それでも彼には、自分のことだけはわからない。」 means: "He, however, knows/understands everything but about himself." or "Things about ...


18

We would say neither: 「この花は水をやられた。」 nor 「この花は水がやられた。」 for two reasons. These "sentences" sound far more unnatural and awkward to native speakers than you could probably imagine. Reason 1: While the "grammatical" passive-voice form of 「やる」 is certainly 「やられる」, the latter generally has a fairly negative connotation. "To have something undesirable ...


18

If the question "May I pet the dog?" means "May I stroke the dog gently?", then none of the phrases you obtained from your sources look good. 「可愛{かわい}がる」 is the closest if not very good. The other two 「飼{か}う」 and 「ペットにする」 are simply out of the question. My own recommendations as a Japanese-speaker would be: 「軽{かる}くなでてもいいですか。」 「ちょっとなでてもいいですか。」 ...


17

To explain the phrase, it seems the phrase 'I can eat glass, it doesn't hurt me' was collected in a variety of languages by someone at Harvard University in the 1990s. https://web.archive.org/web/19990116232350/http://hcs.harvard.edu/~igp/glass.html "The Project is based on the idea that people in a foreign country have an irresistable urge to try to say ...


16

「どうかと思う」 is a roundabout and indirect way of expressing one's somewhat negative opinion or impression of an action, situation, tendency, etc. It is indirect for using the word 「どうか」 ("how is it") instead of directly saying "I don't like it.", "I think it's bad.", etc. A more direct version of 「どうかと思う」 would be 「あまり感心{かんしん}しない」 ("I am not so impressed.") ...


16

Basically, there are just some sounds that exist in other languages which cannot easily be phonemically represented in Japanese. Disclaimer - this is a simplified answer, but ... As with any language, you must differentiate between the actual sounds (phonology) and the writing system which represents the language (orthography). Although there are ...


15

「[Noun] + 仕立{した}て」 means: "(made) in the [Noun] style" 「ビアホール」 is an establishment where people gather for the main purpose of drinking draft beer. When I first saw your question, I was going to say that 「ビアホール」 was a 和製英語{わせいえいご} (= "an English word created by Japanese"), but I have found this place in the U.S., so I am not sure: https://www....


13

Disclaimer: I've never done any professional Japanese to English translation before I found the following in The Routledge Course in Japanese Translation by Yoko Hasegawa. Note that ST stands for source text and TT stands for translated text. Between Japanese and English, an adjustment that is frequently called for concerns paragraph breaks. Compared ...


13

This is a tricky one because this sign is 1) written right-to-left, 2) using kanji for numbers, and 3) using old/traditional kanji for the numbers. So rearranging it left-to-right and using simplified kanji would give us (top) [時間貸]{じ・かん・かし} → Hourly Rental / Pay by-the-hour (right, red) [五十M先]{ご・じゅう・メートル・さき} [入口]{いり・ぐち} → Entrance (is) 50 meters ahead ...


13

「のそ」 is an onomatopoeic word describing a slow walk, slow body movements, etc. We also use 「のそのそ」 and 「のそりのそり」. You can forget "a moment later" for good.


12

(I know what "から" and the sentence-ending "か" mean, but not this) Yes, it's this から followed by this か. から here is a reason/cause marker. か is a question marker but is used like "presumably" or "probably" here. And 興奮 is "excitement", not "doubtful interest". 興奮: excitement 興奮から: due to his excitement, ... 興奮からか: presumably due to his excitement, ...; ...


12

As a fact-based answer, there is nothing much to say besides that コ here stands for コーン (corn). However, I'm pretty sure that the exact word form バタコチーズライス is chosen because it makes a reference to two major characters in the famous children manga/anime series アンパンマン, namely バタコ (a female baker) and チーズ (dog). (from the left: チーズ, バタコ, ジャムおじさん)


12

「私は日本語を勉強したい理由」 This is a nice try, but the 「は」 needs to be replaced by a 「が」. 「は」 is not an option here. Why not? That is because 「私が日本語を勉強したい」 is a relative clause that modifies 「理由」, correct? Inside if-clauses and relative clauses, the subject/topic marker is always 「が」. We say: 「ジョーンズさんが買った車はBMWです。」 「あなたが日本に行くなら、私もいっしょに行きたい。」 The 「が」 in either ...


11

I assume you're specifically talking about kanji/hanzi glyphs. (Hiragana are obviously more cursive.) Basically the overall appearances of typical Chinese hanzi and Japanese kanji fonts are not significantly different in terms of line width, roundness, etc., just as English "A", French "A" and German "A" are rendered the same. If you compare recent ...


11

The short answer is "it is gibberish". It's not a Japanese word Japanese people recognize. It indeed looks like plefectanswer, as snailboat pointed out in the comment section. See also: Can kanji compounds be formed arbitrarily? But each kanji is easy and has at least some positive meaning. So if you separate each kanji with a nakaguro and write the phrase ...


11

This やる is a simple verb meaning "to do". やっているんだ is "(It's that) I'm doing it", where this 'it' refers to the thing this guy is doing. (It's not mentioned in your question, so see the previous context by yourself.) And 仕方がないと思って is modifying やっている like an adverb. 「仕方がない」と思ってやっているんだ。 (literally) Thinking "it cannot be helped", I'm doing it. I'm (...


11

Here's a very simplified explanation: because the か makes it a question.


10

うきよ was originally 憂き世 ("this melancholic/miserable world") but reanalyzed as 浮き世 ("this transient/fleeting world") around the Edo period. It was associated with sadness and ethical corruption at first, but later it came to mean "secular part of our world" or simply "this modern world." It also gained associations with mass culture and eroticism. (I did not ...


10

I would say 「~~でできている」, as in: この腕時計は、[金]{きん}でできている。 The wristwatch is made out of gold. この家は、木でできている。 This house is made of wood. 女の子は何でできているの? ♪What are little girls made of?


10

The translation you saw looks neither like the most natural translation nor like traditional subtitle translation practice. It's more like a translation that must make compromises with lip sync requirements (this scene?). Basically, Japanese (commercial) subtitle translation is the art of summary. 清水 (1992), titled 『映画字幕は翻訳ではない』 (Movie Subtitles Are Not ...


10

逃げられたの 彼氏に!! As you've noticed, this is an inverted word order of: 彼氏に逃げられたの 逃げられた here is Suffering Passive (迷惑の受身), which is a kind of Indirect Passive (間接受身). As you know, in passive sentences the agent (動作主) of the action is marked with に. eg お母さんが私を褒める → 私がお母さんに褒められる. Here the agent of 逃げる is 彼氏, hence: 彼氏が逃げた (active) My boyfriend ran away. → ...


9

The word you're seeing is ふつ~, which is 普通【ふつう】 ("normally", "usually") written in a slangy/sloppy way. This ~ is not a tilde but a wave dash, which is used in place of a standard long vowel marker (ー). Notice the width of the character. In vertical writing it's rotated 90 degrees. You can write like おか~さん instead of おかあさん, そ~です instead of そうです, and so on (...


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