33

In technical documents or technical news media, the name of a foreign website or company is typically written completely as-is. 米国Microsoft社のWindows 日本語についての質問サイトであるJapanese Language Stack Exchange Mass media for general public (e.g., 読売新聞) usually katakanize foreign proper nouns because many of their readers do not understand English at all: ...


22

ちんちんかく means 正座をする(sitting straight) in Toyama dialect. However you had better not use it except in Toyama prefecture, because most Japanese people would think it means "to scratch a penis".


20

Japanese pronouns tend to be inferred from context. Since there is no context here it is impossible to know whether it should be I, we or you. In real life, either in conversation or in a book you would never have just this one sentence and so it would normally be pretty obvious which pronoun is appropriate from what was said before. Without the context, ...


17

Basically, there are just some sounds that exist in other languages which cannot easily be phonemically represented in Japanese. Disclaimer - this is a simplified answer, but ... As with any language, you must differentiate between the actual sounds (phonology) and the writing system which represents the language (orthography). Although there are ...


17

To explain the phrase, it seems the phrase 'I can eat glass, it doesn't hurt me' was collected in a variety of languages by someone at Harvard University in the 1990s. https://web.archive.org/web/19990116232350/http://hcs.harvard.edu/~igp/glass.html "The Project is based on the idea that people in a foreign country have an irresistable urge to try to say ...


14

取り寄せるのに1日から2日は見ておいたほうがいいからね。 You know, (expect) it takes at least one day or two before the product arrives (to our office/department). This 見る is "to expect", "to estimate", etc. See the tenth definition here. 1日 and 2日 refer to the time length between the order and the arrival. The ついたち/いちにち distinction is special and important, but ふつか, みっか and so ...


12

As a fact-based answer, there is nothing much to say besides that コ here stands for コーン (corn). However, I'm pretty sure that the exact word form バタコチーズライス is chosen because it makes a reference to two major characters in the famous children manga/anime series アンパンマン, namely バタコ (a female baker) and チーズ (dog). (from the left: チーズ, バタコ, ジャムおじさん)


12

魔晄{まこう} is a compound invented for the game, which is why you won't find it in any dictionary. The reason the second character is difficult to find is that 晄 is a rare variant of the more common 晃 ("bright, dazzling"). Even if I had never seen the character 晄, I would be likely to guess the reading こう by interpreting it as a 形声文字. It seems like a stretch ...


11

Here's a very simplified explanation: because the か makes it a question.


10

The translation you saw looks neither like the most natural translation nor like traditional subtitle translation practice. It's more like a translation that must make compromises with lip sync requirements (this scene?). Basically, Japanese (commercial) subtitle translation is the art of summary. 清水 (1992), titled 『映画字幕は翻訳ではない』 (Movie Subtitles Are Not ...


10

逃げられたの 彼氏に!! As you've noticed, this is an inverted word order of: 彼氏に逃げられたの 逃げられた here is Suffering Passive (迷惑の受身), which is a kind of Indirect Passive (間接受身). As you know, in passive sentences the agent (動作主) of the action is marked with に. eg お母さんが私を褒める → 私がお母さんに褒められる. Here the agent of 逃げる is 彼氏, hence: 彼氏が逃げた (active) My boyfriend ran away. → ...


9

ゴクリ (ごくり) is an onomatopoeia for swallowing down something once, in this case, saliva (*gulp*). It is used to suggest that someone sees something "tasty", or holds breath expecting something. Written in halfwidth katakana in the end of a sentence because it is a long-standing format for short text elements in Japanese memes. While the onomatopoeia has many ...


9

This 何ひとつ is a negative polarity item. This means 何ひとつ is always followed by a negative expression, and 何ひとつ by itself is an intensifier. You asked about "何ひとつ in a negative sentence", but there is no such a thing as "何ひとつ in an affirmative (non-negative) sentence"! (何ひとつ思い出せる is simply ungrammatical.) The translation of your sentence is "I cannot remember (...


9

手入れ (and beautified お手入れ) refer to daily or quick care/maintenance/cleaning usually done by the user themself. It is mainly used with small objects such as kitchen tools, and even with body parts such as skin or nails. 整備 refers to professional maintenance/overhaul of complex machines, vehicles and infrastructure. For example, 手入れ is typically used with 包丁, ...


8

気にかける is a set phrase which means "to care about", "to worry about". 一切 (+ ない) is "(not) at all". This 一切 is a stiff negative polarity item that works like まったく. よう + と + する is "to try to do ~", and なさる is an honorific version of する. など and も are for emphasis. 人の批難を気にかける: to worry about other's criticism 人の批難を気にかけようとする: to try to worry about other's ...


8

考えてもみなかったこと Things that I don't see even though I ponder I'm afraid you're not parsing this part correctly. The (~て)みなかった is a subsidiary verb meaning "didn't try doing". 考えてみる "try thinking" + も "even" + negative ない + past た ⇒ 考えてもみなかった lit. "didn't even try thinking" → "didn't even think of" "didn't even occur to me" ろくに is used with a negative word/...


8

The amount of kanji is irrelevant because they are a writing system. The thing is that, when writing a foreign word in japanese, what happens is that the sound of the word is aproximated to the sounds available in the Japanese language, and then it can be written down using a Japanese syllabary such as hiragana or katakana (not Kanji). What you see in ...


8

ぎゃんかわ is slang for “really cute”. ぎゃんかわ → とても可愛{かわ}いい


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