48

○ まる OK; correct; yes; supported; available (like ✔; note that the check mark usually means "wrong" in Japanese examinations) masked/censored character (like * in English used to mask characters in certain words; see this) rival horse; second likely to win (horse race; favorite horse is marked with ◎) win; victory; 白星 (when used as opposed to 黒星 = ● =...


43

We are actually talking about two different words here. When used in phrases such as 「さあ、[忘]{わす}れましょう」 and「さあ、[行]{い}きましょう」, 「さあ」 is an exclamation/interjection expressing the speaker's intention to invite or press the other person to perform an action. It has a meaning close to that of "okay", "now" and "c'mon". When 「さあ」 is used in phrases such as 「でもさあ」...


42

No. Japanese "haute cuisine" is called 懐石(料理). Mathematical analysis is 解析(学). What is true is that 懐石 and 解析 are homophones, both pronounced かいせき and, in context, both may be referred to as かいせき. However, they are not the same word. By the way, there are more homophones for かいせき, so he could have also said that "analysis" is the "same word" as bizarre ...


35

It's because English "free" has two major meanings which are totally different, and no native Japanese word covers both of the two meanings of "free". Free as in "free WiFi", no charge = 無料 Free as in "free speech", liberty = 自由 If you type only "free" to, for example, Google Translate, it can't guess the intended meaning, so it ends up with フリー, which is ...


35

It says 「檢閲濟{けんえつずみ}」"ken'etsuzumi", which means "inspected". The kanji are of the old style. The presently-used kanji are 「検閲済」.


34

Seeing as Japanese doesn't really have anything analogous to English 'curse' words, you won't find anything that really feels the same. That particular phrase has a sort of punchiness to it that nothing in Japanese really renders well. It's in some ways more of a cultural thing than a linguistic one - expressing that particular emotion looks different when ...


34

In technical documents or technical news media, the name of a foreign website or company is typically written completely as-is. 米国Microsoft社のWindows 日本語についての質問サイトであるJapanese Language Stack Exchange Mass media for general public (e.g., 読売新聞) usually katakanize foreign proper nouns because many of their readers do not understand English at all: ...


33

[最高]{さい・こう} means "the highest/maximum/best/greatest".


28

I'm actually a developer working for a Japanese programming company. It might depend on some people, but as far as buttons go. 「保存」、「登録」、「完了」、「キャンセル」 etc. seems like the way to go. Of course your will probably need a confirmation box in which you will usually write in the ます form. 「削除します。よろしいですか?」 It might be more common to write a verb on the ...


28

ルツクハ is ハクツル(白鶴) written in reverse order. Japanese was written from right to left in horizontal writing until mid 20th century. Some labels still use the system to express their tradition and authenticity. 白鶴 is a famous sake brand. According to the company's website, the name has been used since 1747. http://www.hakutsuru.co.jp/english/company/history....


25

「め」 is a suffix of contempt when attached to a noun or another person's name. 「この[犬]{いぬ}め!」= "You stupid dog!" 「[許]{ゆる}せん、[田中]{たなか}め!」= "Will never forgive Tanaka the bastard!" Translation is an art. You could use whatever word you feel appropriate for the context that expresses contempt, scorn, disdain, etc. Please note, however, that it becomes a ...


24

デイビット is actually David. そうです indicates a similarity based on direct (probably visual) evidence i.e., David appears/behaves like a good chef based on what you see. In this usage, そう is attached to the i-form of verbs and stem of adjectives. (だ)そうです is a report on what you've heard before. In this usage, そう is attached to the dictionary form of verbs, ...


24

While the pronunciation is the same, the words' etymologies are unrelated. Mathematical analysis is 解析(kaiseki かいせき) while (Japanese) fine cuisine is 懐石(kaiseki かいせき). Both 解 and 析 roughly stands for "understanding", "taking apart". For example, 解説(kaisetu) means "To orally explain", 分析(bunseki) means "To analyze". On the other hand, 懐(kai) refers to ...


24

I think the word [時間]{じかん} was created in the Meiji era, but the word [時]{とき} is older. So it's definitely wrong that "the Japanese didn't have any interest in clocks (until 1871)". I searched in an old-Japanese dictionary and found the usage of 「とき」 in 竹取物語: [宵]{よひ}うち[過]{す}ぎて、[子]{ね}のときばかりに Here, the word [子]{ね}のとき refers to a certain time which is ...


24

Since this is a formal statement, it's better to keep 私の. But people can understand the sentence without it because they know it's your profile. What's worse about your sentence is that your sentence has a number of bad word choices and grammatical errors. 生むています is always ungrammatical. The te-form of 生む is 生んで. There is a subject-predicate mismatch. ...


23

It's short for の家{うち}. You will normally see the abbreviation んち: (1a) 俺の家に来い。 (1b) 俺んちに来い。 (2a) お前の家に行きたいなぁ。 (2b) お前んちに行きたいなぁ。 But in cases where there is already an ん before the abbreviation (like おばあちゃん ends in ん in this case) we just see ち: (3a) タモリさんの家に行きたい。 (3b) タモリさんちに行きたい。 (4a) 明日麻美ちゃんの家に行く。 (4b) 明日麻美ちゃんちに行く。 So your sentences ...


23

ちんちんかく means 正座をする(sitting straight) in Toyama dialect. However you had better not use it except in Toyama prefecture, because most Japanese people would think it means "to scratch a penis".


22

In Japanese, usually 改善【かいぜん】 is no more than a neutral and simple word that corresponds to "improvement" or "refinement". The only fact I know as a piece of knowledge, which make this word somewhat "special", is that some companies like Toyota love this word as a slogan. Apparently, Toyota's special method of 改善, also written specifically as "カイゼン", has ...


22

「にほん で ぼく は しんかんせん を のります。」 is a nice attempt. I would, however, like to address two items here. 「のります」 simply means "will ride". If you want to say "want to ride", you might want to say 「のりたいです」. 「Verb in Continuative Form + たい」 means "to want to [verb]". 「のり」 is the continuative form of 「のる」. The next thing I need to point out is the particle ...


21

There's the prefix 子{こ}- 'child', sometimes spelled 仔: 猫(ねこ)  →  子猫(こねこ)  'kitten' 牛(うし)  →  子牛(こうし)  'calf' 狐(きつね) →  子狐(こぎつね) 'kit' 羊(ひつじ) →  子羊(こひつじ) 'lamb' 豚(ぶた)  →  子豚(こぶた)  'piglet' 犬(いぬ)  →  子犬(こいぬ)  'pup' 鹿(しか)  →  子鹿(こじか)  'fawn' 馬(うま)  →  子馬(こうま)  'foal' It doesn't work for every word, though. 小鳥{こ・とり} is 'small bird', and for '...


21

This sentence is indeed regarded as one of the most difficult translation challenges. This sentence has been translated variously by many translators. Kawai Shunichiro, one of the translators of Hamlet, has the list of 40 translation attempts that have been made by experts. To list a few: アリマス、アリマセン、アレワナンデスカ 1874年、チャールズ・ワーグマン 死ぬるが増か生くるが増か ...


21

「苦手{にがて}ですが、美味{おい}しかったです。」 As a native Japanese-speaker, the only thing I could imagine that sentence was taken to mean would be: "I don't like matcha (or tea ceremonies) in general, but this one I just had tasted great." It would be fairly unusual and unnatural for native speakers to take it to mean anything else. 「苦手」, used in the context of a food/...


21

's' vs. 'z' 「好き好き」 has two completely different meanings depending on how the second 「好き」 is read. 1) When read 「すきずき」, it is a noun meaning "a matter of taste". This is a "dictionary" word; therefore, it is written as 「好き好き」 99% of the time. The well-known saying "There is no accounting for tastes." is thus translated to 「蓼{たで}食{く}う虫{むし}も好{す}き好{ず}き」 ...


20

I think what's throwing you off is that you're translating ところ too literally. ところ does mean "place", but it can be used on a much more abstract level, such as a point in time or a characteristic. For example: 学校へ行くところでした。- I was going to school. (Lit: I was at the point where I was going to school.) 彼は高慢なところがない。- He doesn't have any pride. (Lit: ...


20

This is a classic example of how direct translation rarely works between English and Japanese. When I, a Japanese-speaker, learned years ago that in English they say "My [language name] is rusty.", it took me by surprise because in Japanese, 「錆{さ}びる = "to get rusty"」 is rarely used outside of a context regarding metals. A far more common ...


20

Japanese pronouns tend to be inferred from context. Since there is no context here it is impossible to know whether it should be I, we or you. In real life, either in conversation or in a book you would never have just this one sentence and so it would normally be pretty obvious which pronoun is appropriate from what was said before. Without the context, ...


19

Japanese has tons of compound verbs (複合動詞{ふくごうどうし}) and やり直す is one of them. やり is the masu-stem of やる, which is a very basic verb that means "to do." Note that this verb is almost always written in hiragana when it simply means "to do." 直す here means something like "re-" (as in "reorder", "rethink", etc). It can follow almost any other verb and add the ...


19

Addendum The word 時{とき} is probably the oldest native Japanese word for "time". This term appears in the 万葉集{まんようしゅう} written in Old Japanese and compiled from poems composed from the 300s through the 700s, completed some time after 759 CE. These are some of the oldest surviving examples of written Japanese, suggesting that this term is quite ancient ...


19

「[Noun] + 仕立{じた}て」 means: "made in the [Noun] style" 「ビアホール」 is an establishment where people gather for the main purpose of drinking draft beer in huge beer mugs. When I first saw your question, I was going to say that 「ビアホール」 was a 和製英語{わせいえいご} (= "an English word created by the Japanese"), but I have found this place in the U.S., so I am not so ...


19

「~~だけ + は + Verb + ない」 is the pattern you will need to learn as it is commonly used. It is an expression that describes the single or very few exceptions to a phenomenon. It means: "Someone [Verb] everything but/except ~~." Thus, 「それでも彼には、自分のことだけはわからない。」 means: "He, however, knows/understands everything but about himself." or "Things about ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible