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What is the difference between に触れる and を触れる?

The verb 触れる{ふれる} is a little unintuitive in its usage. Strictly speaking it doesn't mean simply "to touch something" but rather "to touch something to something else". The thing being touched is ...
Ben Roffey's user avatar
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16 votes
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Can someone help explain the difference between Hajimeru and Hajimaru?

In a nutshell, both hajimeru and hajimaru mean "to start". More specifically, hajimeru is transitive -- "to start something". Meanwhile, hajimaru is intransitive -- it cannot take an object, so "...
Eiríkr Útlendi's user avatar
16 votes

に vs. を in "to pass a test"

The ultimate answer to your question is "Japanese is different from English". I understand you want a reason, but there may not be a good reason. Some English transitive verbs are translated using a ...
naruto's user avatar
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15 votes
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Transitive English words becoming intransitive 外来語

There should be exceptions, but I suppose this is largely based on the transitivity of the original Japanese verb before it was replaced by the loanword. (~に)キスする = (~に)口づけする (~に)アクセスする = (~に)進入する/...
naruto's user avatar
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12 votes

Can someone help explain the difference between Hajimeru and Hajimaru?

始める : transitive 会議を始めましょう! Let's start the meeting! 始まる : intransitive 会議が始まりました。The meeting has begun.
Display Name's user avatar
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10 votes
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Why this Transitive Verb with が

The difference between transitive verbs and intransitive verbs is in how verbs relate to their objects. It is true that 「が」is used with intransitive verbs, but the problem we're dealing with here is ...
TFlo83's user avatar
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9 votes

What is going on grammatically with "Xを嫌いになる"?

It's not なる but 嫌い that is "taking the direct object" (?) in this sentence. AFAIK なる itself is always intransitive. 嫌い is a common na-adjective which means "dislike" in the form of Xが嫌いだ. See: Using ...
naruto's user avatar
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9 votes
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Difference between 折る and 折れる

This is an example of a [自他]{じ・た} pair. These pairs are an important concept to learn in Japanese because there are a ton of them! [Here]{LLLL} [are]{LLL} [several]{LLLLLLL} [resources]{LLLLLLLLL} ...
istrasci's user avatar
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9 votes
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Differences between 栽培する, 作る, and 育てる for "grow"?

I guess you can use all three without sounding too odd in gardening contexts. 作る is more common for something edible and may imply growing for crops 育てる may be preferred for flowers (バラを作る is a bit ...
sundowner's user avatar
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9 votes
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Why do we use が instead of を with a 他動詞 in the expression 車が止めてあります?

Is there a grammar rule I'm not aware of? Yes. 他動詞 + ある is a fairly common grammar pattern. It takes the particle が, and it is used to signal that an action has been taken deliberately by someone and ...
jarmanso7's user avatar
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9 votes
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Is 片付きます a word?

Is 片付きます a word? Yes. Does the book have a typo, and is 片付けます the right spelling? No. 片付{かたづ}けます and 片付{かたづ}きます are two different but complementary words with the same basic meaning. One of them, ...
jarmanso7's user avatar
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8 votes

Intransitive verbs and ている

Short answer: Yes, it's a loose rule of thumb with many exceptions. Personally, I wouldn't even bother with memorizing that rule; it seems more trouble than it's worth. Long answer: Verbs in the -te ...
melissa_boiko's user avatar
7 votes
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Can verbs be both transitive and intransitive?

The question of transitivity can get tricky, especially when discussing and using languages as different as English and Japanese. First, some background. Kinds of transitivity Syntactic Most ...
Eiríkr Útlendi's user avatar
7 votes

Can someone help explain the difference between Hajimeru and Hajimaru?

One is transitive (has an object), the other one is intransitive (doesn't have an object). 始める - to begin (something) 始まる - to begin 今日新しいダイエットを始めた。 - I started a new diet today. ...
sazarando's user avatar
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7 votes
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Why を can't be used with existence verbs?

There's a difference between intransitive and indirect. Transitivity (from Latin "transire", "to go across") basically (with exceptions, probably) implies the subject carrying out an action on an ...
7 votes
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Is the verb 売る both a transitive and intransitive verb?

Please read that NHK article more carefully; it says 雑誌が売っている is nonstandard and should be avoided at least in broadcasting. I am aware that the usage of 雑誌が売っている is gradually increasing among young ...
naruto's user avatar
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7 votes

Why do we use が instead of を with a 他動詞 in the expression 車が止めてあります?

You could easily say "The car is stopped (parked) in front of the house" and that would make sense. Yes, but this phrasing loses nuance. The plain form of います is いる, which is used for ...
Karl Knechtel's user avatar
6 votes

Difference between 折る and 折れる

折る is a transitive verb and 折れる is intransitive. Keep in mind 折れる could also mean the conjugated potential form of 折る.
Chronos's user avatar
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6 votes

Are there verbs that are neither intransitive nor transitive?

The following analysis is a paraphrase of the discussion in "Japanese: A linguistic introduction", Hasegawa, 2015 One can consider three classes of predicates when it comes to transitivity. One ...
ooo's user avatar
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6 votes
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Potential form vs Intransitive Verbs

Short answer: Verbs like 切れる can have two meanings, the potential one or the intransitive one. You determine by context. 上司が切れた In this case, it is clear the boss got mad. It could also be written ...
Locksleyu's user avatar
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6 votes

use of particles on direct object

Many Japanese verbs have transitive and intransitive versions. Basically, 終わる (owaru) is an intransitive verb. 終える (oeru) is the transitive equivalent. So here are the most basic usages: ...
naruto's user avatar
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6 votes
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Transitive verbs where the direct object is a clause

This structure is called embedded questions. Is the above form specific to 確かめる? No. It's not specific to 確かめる, but used with 聞く, 考える, 見る, 知っている, 教える, and so on. For example, would the ...
naruto's user avatar
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6 votes
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The transitivity of (auxiliary) verbs

The transitivity of syntactic compound verbs are generally determined by the first verb. As an "auxiliary" verb, you should always use ~始める. 水を流し始める。水が流れ始める。 [×] 水を流し始まる。[×] 水が流れ始まる。 テレビを見続ける。眠り続ける。 [...
naruto's user avatar
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6 votes

この文の「を」の使い方// usage of the particle を

Yes, this is a transitive usage of 言う. It takes the form X(のこと)をYという, and means "to call X Y". For instance: 幼い子供は足のことを「あんよ」という。 Young children call their feet 'tootsies'. Note that while you've ...
Ben Roffey's user avatar
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6 votes

Existence of Transitive/intransitive pairs

Not all verbs come in transitive/intransitive pairs. Quite a few intransitive verbs have no transitive counterpart. To name a few... ある、[行]{い}く、[来]{く}る、[歩]{ある}く、[走]{はし}る、[座]{すわ}る、かみつく、そびえる、[響]{ひび}...
chocolate's user avatar
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6 votes
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Transitive-intransitive pairs with different readings

There are many possible ways to demarcate your question's scope, but if we focus on pairs whose morae until the shorter kanji coverage ends are different (based on the current orthography), the number ...
broccoli forest's user avatar
6 votes

Why does 電池 take the を particle

咲【さき】は電池{でんち}を時計{とけい}に入{い}れました。 As noted in the comments, the verb in your sample sentence is 入【い】れます・入【い】れる, not 入【はい】ります・入【はい】る. The former with れ is the transitive form meaning "to put something ...
Eiríkr Útlendi's user avatar
6 votes

How do you say this? (Warning NSFW)

Your sentence has two mistakes. In Japanese, i-adjectives (and i-adjective-like auxiliaries たい/ない) don't need a copula (だ). You should end this sentence with たい alone, without だ. See this. 座りたい means ...
naruto's user avatar
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