40

No. Japanese "haute cuisine" is called 懐石(料理). Mathematical analysis is 解析(学). What is true is that 懐石 and 解析 are homophones, both pronounced かいせき and, in context, both may be referred to as かいせき. However, they are not the same word. By the way, there are more homophones for かいせき, so he could have also said that "analysis" is the "same word" as bizarre ...


26

Answer: They're not different. Not exactly, anyway. Each group ends up describing the same verbs; they just arrive at their classification by different routes. All う-verbs are 五段【ごだん】 verbs (and vice-versa). All る-verbs are 一段【いちだん】 verbs (and vice-versa). う-verbs and る-verbs I learned the う-/る- distinction as well (as likely most English-speakers did), ...


23

While the pronunciation is the same, the words' etymologies are unrelated. Mathematical analysis is 解析(kaiseki かいせき) while (Japanese) fine cuisine is 懐石(kaiseki かいせき). Both 解 and 析 roughly stands for "understanding", "taking apart". For example, 解説(kaisetu) means "To orally explain", 分析(bunseki) means "To analyze". On the other hand, 懐(kai) refers to ...


18

舒适区 is totally unfamiliar to Japanese. I don't even know what the first two kanjis are. Anyway, if you want to emphasize the negative aspect of "comfort zone" and want to say "the place you can't stay forever", a good word for both of your examples is 「ぬるま湯【ゆ】」 (literally "tepid water"). ぬるま湯につかる = stay safe, avoid challenge, lack vitality The trip is ...


18

The columns (or rows) that have the same initial consonant are labeled as the first item in that column (consonant + a) followed by [行]{ぎょう}. Examples of such are あ行, か行, さ行, た行, etc. The rows (or columns) that have the same vowel sound are labeled with that vowel in hiragana (あ, い, う, え, or お) followed by [段]{だん}. Thus, the five rows are labeled as あ段, い段, ...


16

After some research, there seems to be little difference in meaning. In some situations, maybe ease of pronunciation is more of a guide than nuance of meaning. For example, in the Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese (BCCWJ, 少納言), we have 大きな木 154 results 大きい木 12 results (But 木 is clearly no abstract concept.) However, my question stated that ...


16

現金 is the word that corresponds to cash as opposed to money in a bank account, etc. 紙幣 means paper money or banknotes as opposed to 硬貨 (coins).


14

They are known as Arabic Numerals, or アラビア数字 in Japanese. As you may notice, 1, 2, 3, etc. were developed by Indian mathematicians and did not originate from ancient Rome. Up until the 14th century Roman numerals were used, but were eventually abandoned in favor of Arabic Numerals.


12

I believe that when you use the 連用形 as a conjunction, the form is referred to as the 中止形. This usage is described by 中止法. For future reference, here's the definition for 中止形 from 日本文法大辞典 (p.475): 中止形【ちゅうしけい】 連用形の中の一つで、主に中止法として用いられる形。 〔例〕花咲き、鳥歌ふ    空青く、雲白し    波静かに、風爽やかなり ただ、現代語の形容動詞には「(静か)だっ・で・に」の三形があるが特に「(静か)で」の形を中止形という(町は静かで、誰もいない)。...


12

The following terms are synonyms: consonant-stem verb u-verb class 1 verb, group 1 verb, type 1 verb, ... godan (五段) verb The following terms are synonyms: vowel-stem verb ru-verb class 2 verb, group 2 verb, type 2 verb, ... ichidan (一段) verb


11

I think you have a couple choices. For "fluent": ペラペラ。 This is a slightly colloquial word (due to being an onomatopoeia sounding like quick speech), which can mean "fluent", both in the sense of (a) speaking uninterruptedly, and by extension, (b) being skilled in the language. This might be the most common word you hear when describing someone as "fluent" ...


10

I think that even twins, born only moments apart, are considered to be older and younger based on who was born first. So even if you're both twenty years old, the normal rules apply. That's why you can say things like 双子のお兄さん "older twin brother".


9

ドットマトリクス is an established word, but unfortunately only among mechanical engineers. I'm not very sure how common the word is in English, but I can confirm that it's anything but what you'd hear from lay people in Japan. If you want them to grasp the concept of dot matrix, I think you can only explain it: 電光掲示板のような, 古いレシートのような, 絨毯の織り目のような, 点描画のような, 点を並べて作る ...


9

Before cooking rice, many people wash the rice by "grinding" (hence 研ぐ) the individual grains against one another under flowing water until the water runs more or less clear. (In the olden days the purpose of the grinding was to remove the hull (糠【ぬか】).) In the process of this, together with rest of the hulls and dust, minerals and starch are also removed. ...


9

土方 is a common word, but if you want a neutral term that is usable in news articles, essays and such, (建築/土木)作業員 is better. 土方 tends to have a negative/derogatory undertone, and we never see it used in government documents and such. Basically I always refrain from referring to someone as 土方. Some broadcasting companies even have explicitly prohibited it as ...


8

You'll understand if you just look at them romanized: Vowel-stem verbs (一段動詞)  食べない tabe-nai  食べます tabe-masu  食べる  tabe-ru  食べれば tabe-reba  食べよう tabe-yoo The stem is tabe-, which ends with /e/, a vowel. Consonant-stem verbs (五段動詞)  泳がない oyog-anai  泳ぎます oyog-imasu  泳ぐ   oyog-u  泳げば  oyog-eba  泳ごう  oyog-oo The stem is oyog-, which ends with /g/, a ...


8

Your kanji are correct. [受]{う}け[身]{み}. You can also write it [受]{うけ}[身]{み}. The general meaning of 受け身, however, is not "receiving body" but "passive." Thus, the passive voice "it is written by him" (vs. active "he writes"). I am not familiar with your martial art, but I would guess that it means you take a passive rather than active role in the combat -- ...


8

Wikipedia says that Osaka used to be spelt 大坂, and is now spelt 大阪. It is more complicated than that: Initially it was 難波 (Naniwa). In 1496, it was 小坂 ("Little Hill", Osaka AND Ozaka). 尾坂 and other spellings also exist. This is thought to focus more on the area around Ishiyama Honganji. In 1583, Toyotomi Hideyoshi built 大坂城, and throughout the Edo period ...


8

In Japanese, a 助動詞 is a conjugatable particle, as opposed to 助詞 which do not conjugate. Like noun, verb etc, 助動詞 is now considered a part of of speech. The terminology is rather unfortunate, but originally (early Meiji) it was sub-classified under the category of verb (動詞). This is due to the influence of English in which 助動詞 represents "auxiliary verbs" ...


8

I often hear it referred to as [ムービー]{LHHH} (rather than [ムービー]{HLLL}), although I hear カットシーン is equally common.


8

擬声語{ぎせいご}・擬音語{ぎおんご} and 擬態語{ぎたいご}・擬情語{ぎじょうご} In general: Onomatopoeia (Ideophone). Specifically, in order, words that mimic: voices, sounds, states, and feelings. See the wiki article.


8

ルビ (rubi) is jargon which mainly refers to the characters' appearance (small annotative characters placed on top of or to the right of main text), and is preferred in the publishing industry. Even Microsoft Word call those characters ルビ, and I believe the majority of native Japanese people understand this term. We sometimes encounter rubies which are not ...


7

According to Microsoft Language Portal, they call it “wait cursor” in English and “待機カーソル” in Japanese in the documentation for Visual Studio 2008 SP1, 2010, and 2012. I am not sure how popular this term is among users.


7

nkjit's guess of 漢字読めない (kanji yomenai) was correct. I don't know exactly what 漢字読めない (kanji yomenai) means, but the term seems to exist, possibly as a slight neologism. It's mentioned in Japanese Wikipedia's page on KY. Then Japanese Prime Minister Tarō Asō has apparently been called a KY for his misreading of kanji. Describing himself as a Manga fan ...


7

As Jesse Good said, Arabic numerals (0, 1, 2, …, 9) are called アラビア数字 in Japanese. Another name for them is 算用数字. As an aside, numerals in kanji (一, 二, 三, …), loaned from Chinese, are called 漢数字 in Japanese. Roman numerals (I, II, III, …) are called ローマ数字.


7

You may or may not know that the so-called "Bushido code" was popularized (and somewhat canonized) by Inazo Nitobé [sic] in Bushido: The Soul of Japan (1900) and first published in English. One could say that the canon word for "veracity" in the sense of the "Bushido code" is the English word "veracity". Only some years later, after being popular overseas, ...


7

_都/道/府/県 _市 _区 _町 町 is just part of the name of an area in 市/区, so it can be written as (-)cho or (-)machi depending on its actual name. An area name does not always contain 町. 東京都町田市小山町(Oyamacho / Oyama-cho) 東京都町田市金森(Kanamori) 東京都千代田区一番町(Ichibancho / Ichiban-cho) 東京都千代田区飯田橋(Iidabashi) 大阪府大阪市中央区松屋町(Matsuyamachi / Matsuya-machi) 大阪府大阪市中央区北浜(Kitahama) Note: ...


6

In Japanese it is called 連体修飾語 (for a word) or 連体修飾節 (for a phrase). 連体修飾 means modification or description of a noun, or in Japanese 体言に連なる修飾. As suggested by the word “prenominal”, it is placed before a noun. Eg: 手の込んだ 料理 Here, 手の込んだ is placed before and describes 料理. Usually, 連体形 of 用言 (動詞, 形容詞 and 形容動詞) is used as 連体修飾語. 手の込んだ is also a 連体形. 手 (...


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