Hot answers tagged

9

Rather than just solving your exercise (which is not the point of this website anyway) I'll try to give you general suggestions about how to approach this kind of problem. 1. Understand the context. What is the sentence talking about? It's an obvious question but it's important. Exam tip: If you have no clue or it's too difficult, maybe with some kanji/...


9

Place + の + 東/西/南/北 + にある is indeed ambiguous, but you can usually determine the meaning in one way with the aid of the context and some background knowledge: 伏見桃山城は京都の南にある。 Fushimi-Momoyama Castle is in the South of Kyoto. 奈良県は京都の南にある。 Nara Prefecture is located to the south of Kyoto. If you want to avoid any confusion, you can say: Xは京都の南部にある。: inside ...


8

First off, I think you got the actors the wrong way round. A また太っちゃった。 I ended up getting fat again. B あまいものばかり食べているからだよ。 That's because you eat nothing but sweets. Can you remove からだ? Grammatically you can, but it wouldn't sound natural in the same way that this English exchange would sound slightly awkward: A) I ended up getting fat again. B)...


7

の is a very flexible particle, but there is one strict rule: the last noun is the main noun. Others serve as modifiers. 日本人の医者 a Japanese doctor / a doctor who is Japanese 医者の日本人 a Japanese person who is a doctor If you want to say "a 30-year-old female Japanese doctor", doctor is the main word, so your translation should not end with 女 or 日本人. Besides ...


6

The topic particle "は" leaves some room for interpretation, but in general, everything that follows it--and is not specifically indicated otherwise--is in relation to the "thing" (could be person, place, activity, etc.) indicated by the "は". With that in mind, the correct translation is the second one (My younger brother goes to school in his friend's big ...


6

「僕のいけんでインタネットは悪い点よりもっといい点があります。」 This sentence, while it would be understood by at least half of all native speakers, is not grammatical. Here is why. 「もっといい」 can only be correctly used when making a comparison between "good things" and "even better things". That is いい vs. もっといい. That, however, is not what you want to talk about this time. You want ...


6

I can't understand why and how come both modifiers are put together directly in this fashion: 自然が多いこの町... In the phrase 「自然が多いこの町」, 自然が多い is a relative clause that modifies この町. [自然が多い]この町 This town [which has a lot of nature /which is rich in nature] < Its non-relative version is: この町は、自然が多い。 This town is rich in nature. Is it possible to join ...


6

In this particular case, both この自然が多い町 and 自然が多いこの町 refer to the same thing, and they are interchangeable. In many other cases, however, placing この at a distant place may introduce a difference in meaning: 魚が美味しいこの町 This town where fish are delicious この魚が美味しい町 The town where this (particular) fish is delicious 妻と出会ったこの町 this town where I met my wife ...


5

Pretty simply, ~とは! follows the 終止形 of a verb/adjective (like English "How + [adjective]!"), whereas ~といったら! follows a noun (like English "What a + [noun]!"). 彼があんなに喜ぶとは! 彼の喜んだ顔といったら! 彼の喜びようといったら! 彼女の絵がこれほどに綺麗だとは! 彼女の絵の綺麗さといったら! 佐藤さんがあんなにセンスがいいとは! 佐藤さんのセンスの良さといったら! Bonus: ~といったらない and ~といったらありはしない follow both a noun and an adjective (...


5

「日本語がかんたんな本」 is a noun phrase where 「日本語がかんたんな」 is a relative clause modifying 「本」. Its non-relative version would be: (その)本は、日本語がかんたんです。 lit. As for the book, Japanese is simple. → The book is written in simple Japanese. 「もう少し」("a little more") is an adverb that modifies the na-adjective 「かんたんな」("simple"). You can parse your example this way: [(...


5

心配いりません is the same as 心配はいりません (literally "worry is not needed"), but は is omitted. Here 心配 is a simple noun meaning "worry" or "anxiety". Suru-verbs are essentially nouns followed by する ("to do"), so you can treat words like 心配, 運転 ("driving"), 勉強 ("studying") also as simple nouns. Since 心配いりません is something people say very often, you can safely omit は ...


5

This is a very important construction called a relative clause. [教]{おし}える[人]{ひと} a person who teaches The rule is described in detail in this question: Relative clauses distinguishing whom/with which/that


5

In general, it is safe to use a verb directly before a noun. There is no modification needed. If you add の after a verb, you turn it into a noun. Two nouns cannot be connected directly, there has to be a の inbetween, as in 私の本. HTH Zeyuan


5

Your usage of ずっと is just fine, but there are some other errors. A minimally corrected version is: 若い時から私は日本語をずっと勉強したかったです。 に refers to one time point in the past. But your desire is a longstanding one that have remained even after you were no longer 若い. So you should use から ("from") instead. Your desire basically belongs to the past, so you need to use ...


5

連用形 (usually translated as "continuative form") is one of "the basic 6 conjugation forms" of Japanese verbs/adjectives. For the ichidan verb 食べる, its 連用形 is 食べ. For godan verbs, many of them have two different 連用形. For example, 書く has two 連用形, namely 書き and 書い. How can we make a 連用形? Simply, remove ます from the masu-form. For godan verbs, you can create the ...


5

First the typo: 終わりまで -> 終わるまで. Next you should really consider the meaning of the sentence you are trying to construct as well as the grammar. What do you think もう would mean if the sentence was ゲームがもう終わるまで...? Until the game finishes more?/now?/soon?/already? None of these make much sense to me. There is another verb in the sentence, and there is another ...


5

Both conjugations are correct, and are interchangeable in casual to moderately-formal settings. In formal written Japanese, however, ~くありません/~くありませんでした is the better choice. ~くないです/~くなかったです may be seen as colloquial, informal or even a little childish, depending on the situation. In general, in highly stiff formal text, it's (still) safe to avoid i-...


5

「先日の佐伯真一さん殺人事件と、昨夜の四ッ星重工爆発炎上事故…それに、誘拐および殺人未遂事件を調べている警視庁は、この事件の裏で、大掛かりな軍事汚職事件が絡んでいるものと見て、真相の究明に全力を尽くすと発表しています。」 「見る」, in this context, means none other than "to judge". It is often used for that meaning in news reporting regarding police investigations. The subject of 「見て」 is 「警視庁{けいしちょう}」 = "the (Tokyo) Metropolitan Police Department". 「~~と見る」 = "to ...


4

The statement is an oversimplification. The ending か tends to be dropped most of the time, because it makes it sound crude ... not necessarily rude, maybe possibly. And since fiction has a larger tolerance for more expressive speech, you'll encounter it more often. Also when talking to oneself politeness isn't really required, so that's more permissive. ...


4

In archaic Japanese, there was no such thing as a nominalizer. Instead, the 連体形 (or attributive form, noun-modifying form) of a verb was used to nominalize a noun. We can still see an attributive form used as a noun in proverbs and idioms, for example 逃げるが勝ち ("Running is winning") and 聞くは一時の恥 ("Asking is a one-time shame"). ~するがよい is using the same grammar. ...


4

Is この referring to サウンド or 中二心? How does に and an intransitive verb work together? My translation attempt is: What is this sound that resonates with my chuuni heart? The この refers to サウンド. The basic structure of this sentence is 「何だ、このサウンドは?」 (= Inversion of 「このサウンドは何だ?」, "What is this sound?") The に is an indirect object marker. 響く is an intransitive verb ...


4

今、駅に向かって歩いているところです。 I am walking toward the station. (i.e. I am on the way.) 今、駅に向かって歩くところです。 I am just about to walk toward the station. (i.e., I have not departed yet.) 今、駅に向かって歩いたところです。 I have just walked toward the station. (i.e., I have finished walking.) These three sentences are all at least grammatical, but Sentence 1 is the most ...


4

Like the Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar says: ながら expresses an action that occurs concurrently or simultaneously with another action. The action expressed by Verbながら is always secondary to the action expressed in the main clause. B: じゃ、コーヒーを飲みながら話しましょう。 Then, let's talk over a cup of coffee. C: *じゃ、話しながらコーヒーを飲みましょう。 Then, let's ...


4

I think the important difference to note here is between the two verbs 始まる and 始める: 始まる is an intransitive verb. It means that "something starts". 始める is a transitive verb. It means that "somebody starts something". Furthermore, note that the particle "を" often marks the direct object of a verb, and the particle "が" often marks the subject of a verb. In ...


4

In addition to Kaizokugari's answer, I'd like to point out that 始【はじ】まりました is an intransitive verb -- it cannot take an object marked with を. This verb means that "something starts on its own". The "something" here would be the subject of the verb, and thus it takes the subject-marking particle が. To break it down, your sample sentence in Japanese is a ...


4

いきなり is an adverb meaning "out of nowhere", "all of the sudden". Forget "without warning" for now. It plainly modifies 言い出す as an adverb. 言い出す is the first verb after いきなり, so it cannot be simpler. 何を is "what". 何 is the object of 言い出す. 言い出す is "to start saying", "to bring up (a topic)". Its subject is the girl. か is the question marker. と思えば is the plain ...


4

向こう側 refers to a place beyond some landmark, e.g., 虹の向こう側 "somewhere over the rainbow", 地平線の向こう側 "a faraway place beyond the horizon". Judging from the explanation of the book of the same title (NSFW), this word seems to figuratively refer to an extremely fetish interest of 僕, a person who has "gone too far" in terms of sexual interest. I don't know what the ...


4

I assume you already understand the basic difference between に and で when there is a concrete verb. So, in what context do you want to say "In one's room"? Is this an answer to a certain question, or is this a title or something? If this is an answer to a certain question, there must be a conrete implied verb, and your particle must correspond to that verb....


4

This こと simply means "(intangible) thing". Simpler examples are: 悲しいこと sad thing / something sad 嬉しいこと happy thing / something happy 簡単なこと easy thing / something easy Likewise, 訳の分からないこと means "nonsensical/unreasonable thing", which is the object of the verb 言う. In case you don't know what this 訳の is doing, you have to analyze this part as a relative ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible