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14

みてー is a contracted form of みたい ("is like ~"). It's an instance of /ai/-to-/ee/ contraction. 上げて is the te-form of 上げる, and 落とす is a verb. Therefore a very literal translation is "It's like I raised it and then dropped it". 上げて落とす is a slangy expression which may be called an idiom. It roughly means "to set someone's expectations and then disappoint them", "...


10

Place + の + 東/西/南/北 + にある is indeed ambiguous, but you can usually determine the meaning in one way with the aid of the context and some background knowledge: 伏見桃山城は京都の南にある。 Fushimi-Momoyama Castle is in the South of Kyoto. 奈良県は京都の南にある。 Nara Prefecture is located to the south of Kyoto. If you want to avoid any confusion, you can say: Xは京都の南部にある。: inside ...


9

First off, I think you got the actors the wrong way round. A また太っちゃった。 I ended up getting fat again. B あまいものばかり食べているからだよ。 That's because you eat nothing but sweets. Can you remove からだ? Grammatically you can, but it wouldn't sound natural in the same way that this English exchange would sound slightly awkward: A) I ended up getting fat again. B)...


9

It is from the verb 「通{とお}す」. 「Verb in 連用形{れんようけい} (continuative form) + 通す」 means: "to continue [verb]-ing to the end" In 「しどおし」, the first 「し」 is the 連用形 of the verb 「する」. 「どおし」is the 連用形 of 「通す」. The と-to-ど change is rendaku. Thus, 「どおし」 has nothing to do with「同士」 -- none. 「通す」 is written 「とおす」 in kana, not 「とうす」. My TL of the line: "Even ...


8

First sentence まいばん くにの かぞくに でんわします。 I call my family at my home country every evening. First of all, the family is not making the call, but someone (probably the speaker, it could be someone else) is making a phone call to the family, because it is marked with the particle に. The particle に marks the goal or destination of the action, in this case, ...


7

連用形 (usually translated as "continuative form") is one of "the basic 6 conjugation forms" of Japanese verbs/adjectives. For the ichidan verb 食べる, its 連用形 is 食べ. For godan verbs, many of them have two different 連用形. For example, 書く has two 連用形, namely 書き and 書い. How can we make a 連用形? Simply, remove ます from the masu-form. For godan verbs, you can create the ...


7

の is a very flexible particle, but there is one strict rule: the last noun is the main noun. Others serve as modifiers. 日本人の医者 a Japanese doctor / a doctor who is Japanese 医者の日本人 a Japanese person who is a doctor If you want to say "a 30-year-old female Japanese doctor", doctor is the main word, so your translation should not end with 女 or 日本人. Besides ...


6

In this particular case, both この自然が多い町 and 自然が多いこの町 refer to the same thing, and they are interchangeable. In many other cases, however, placing この at a distant place may introduce a difference in meaning: 魚が美味しいこの町 This town where fish are delicious この魚が美味しい町 The town where this (particular) fish is delicious 妻と出会ったこの町 this town where I met my wife ...


6

I can't understand why and how come both modifiers are put together directly in this fashion: 自然が多いこの町... In the phrase 「自然が多いこの町」, 自然が多い is a relative clause that modifies この町. [自然が多い]この町 This town [which has a lot of nature /which is rich in nature] < Its non-relative version is: この町は、自然が多い。 This town is rich in nature. Is it possible to join ...


6

「僕のいけんでインタネットは悪い点よりもっといい点があります。」 This sentence, while it would be understood by at least half of all native speakers, is not grammatical. Here is why. 「もっといい」 can only be correctly used when making a comparison between "good things" and "even better things". That is いい vs. もっといい. That, however, is not what you want to talk about this time. You want ...


6

「金{かね}は取{と}れる時に取れるところから取れるだけ取っておくものだ。」 I shall insert commas so that the sentence might look somewhat more manageable to some. 「金は、取れる時に、取れるところから、取れるだけ、取っておくものだ。」 The core of this sentence is: 「金は取っておくものだ。」 ("One should take/earn money.") The original sentence adds three qualifiers to the core as below: 「金は (when) (from where/who) (how much) ...


6

「前進{ぜんしん}あるのみ」 「練習{れんしゅう}あるのみ」 Replace the 「あるのみ」 part by the other words you mentioned and these phrases will lose the nice literary and/or old-fashioned 'feel' that was intended by the author/speaker. In other words, one should not try to make these phrases look or sound unnecessarily more conversational. 「[Noun] + あるのみ」 should be left alone as ...


5

Both conjugations are correct, and are interchangeable in casual to moderately-formal settings. In formal written Japanese, however, ~くありません/~くありませんでした is the better choice. ~くないです/~くなかったです may be seen as colloquial, informal or even a little childish, depending on the situation. In general, in highly stiff formal text, it's (still) safe to avoid i-...


5

いきなり is an adverb meaning "out of nowhere", "all of the sudden". Forget "without warning" for now. It plainly modifies 言い出す as an adverb. 言い出す is the first verb after いきなり, so it cannot be simpler. 何を is "what". 何 is the object of 言い出す. 言い出す is "to start saying", "to bring up (a topic)". Its subject is the girl. か is the question marker. と思えば is the plain ...


5

First the typo: 終わりまで -> 終わるまで. Next you should really consider the meaning of the sentence you are trying to construct as well as the grammar. What do you think もう would mean if the sentence was ゲームがもう終わるまで...? Until the game finishes more?/now?/soon?/already? None of these make much sense to me. There is another verb in the sentence, and there is another ...


5

Your usage of ずっと is just fine, but there are some other errors. A minimally corrected version is: 若い時から私は日本語をずっと勉強したかったです。 に refers to one time point in the past. But your desire is a longstanding one that have remained even after you were no longer 若い. So you should use から ("from") instead. Your desire basically belongs to the past, so you need to use ...


5

「先日の佐伯真一さん殺人事件と、昨夜の四ッ星重工爆発炎上事故…それに、誘拐および殺人未遂事件を調べている警視庁は、この事件の裏で、大掛かりな軍事汚職事件が絡んでいるものと見て、真相の究明に全力を尽くすと発表しています。」 「見る」, in this context, means none other than "to judge". It is often used for that meaning in news reporting regarding police investigations. The subject of 「見て」 is 「警視庁{けいしちょう}」 = "the (Tokyo) Metropolitan Police Department". 「~~と見る」 = "to ...


5

In Japanese, as a general rule, the more important a piece of information is, the closer it will go to the end of the sentence. In 「この建物にいいレストランがあります」, the feeling is that the most important bit of information is the fact that there is a good restaurant. Whereas in 「いいレストランがこの建物にあります」, the feeling is that the most important bit of information is its ...


5

First, as a basic rule, the polite copula です must be preceded by a (pro)noun or an adjective (eg 犬です, 元気です). お名前はですか is plain ungrammatical because です is directly preceded by the topic marker は. How about 何があなたのお名前ですか? This is actually grammatical, but almost always nonsensical, because this uses exhaustive-listing-ga and thus sounds like "What is the one ...


5

「暗闇{くらやみ}へ」 makes perfect sense as a title and so does 「暗闇の中へ」. In fact, 「[Noun] + へ」 is a fairly common construct for titles. Very short phrases ending with particles in general are common for titles. Titles do not need to sound/look like prose in Japanese. We often hear/see 「空{そら}へ」、「明日{あした}へ」、「未来{みらい}へ」、「夢{ゆめ}の中{なか}へ」, etc.


4

The statement is an oversimplification. The ending か tends to be dropped most of the time, because it makes it sound crude ... not necessarily rude, maybe possibly. And since fiction has a larger tolerance for more expressive speech, you'll encounter it more often. Also when talking to oneself politeness isn't really required, so that's more permissive. ...


4

向こう側 refers to a place beyond some landmark, e.g., 虹の向こう側 "somewhere over the rainbow", 地平線の向こう側 "a faraway place beyond the horizon". Judging from the explanation of the book of the same title (NSFW), this word seems to figuratively refer to an extremely fetish interest of 僕, a person who has "gone too far" in terms of sexual interest. I don't know what the ...


4

I assume you already understand the basic difference between に and で when there is a concrete verb. So, in what context do you want to say "In one's room"? Is this an answer to a certain question, or is this a title or something? If this is an answer to a certain question, there must be a conrete implied verb, and your particle must correspond to that verb....


4

This こと simply means "(intangible) thing". Simpler examples are: 悲しいこと sad thing / something sad 嬉しいこと happy thing / something happy 簡単なこと easy thing / something easy Likewise, 訳の分からないこと means "nonsensical/unreasonable thing", which is the object of the verb 言う. In case you don't know what this 訳の is doing, you have to analyze this part as a relative ...


4

This 叩き込め is nothing but an imperative (i.e., "Crusaders, throw your fist!"). Although 叩き込め is the only imperative verb in the entire lyrics, it's used four times, so you can think it's the main "message" of the song.


4

Yes, 2つの~(の間)に何か関係はありますか is a perfectly natural sentence. の間 is typically optional, but dropping it may make the sentence ambiguous depending on the context: 2人に何か関係はありますか? Are the two people related to each other? Are the two people related to (the problem / it / him / etc)? Adding の間 makes the sentence refer only to the connection between ...


4

Your translation is 100% spot on. However, this usage of 考える is neither colloquial nor poor use of the language. Following your same logic, パッと見て何を模したかわかる形 would imply that the 形 is the thing doing the looking and the understanding, but we know that to not be the case. We know that the thing doing the looking and understanding is a general person, the '...


4

Your translation is correct, and どんな意味が込められているのか考えるもの(=形) is a completely natural Japanese phrase at the same time. Grammatically speaking, I think this is something called a gapless relative clause explained here. Other similar examples include: 英語を学ぶ楽しみ the joy of learning English (not "the joy which is learning English") カエルが水に飛び込む音 the sound of a frog ...


4

「あそこに立っているのが、あなたのみらいの子どもです。」 Your TL: "Your future child will be standing there." Wanikani's: "The person standing over there is your future child." I have no idea what Wanikani is, but its TL is much closer to the original than yours is and here is why. The subject of the original sentence is 「あそこに立っているの」. The 「の」 nominalizes the verb phrase that ...


3

In this case, you can forget nominalization. One way to interpret this sentence is to think of this の as a vague noun meaning "thing" or "one". Then 身につけているの on its own can mean "the thing which I'm wearing" rather than "(the act of) wearing". 身につけているのは検査服だ。 What I'm wearing is a hospital gown. But this construction has a broader use and has a specific ...


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