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47

In Japan, it usually means "Not correct but not completely incorrect". ○ = Correct △ × = Incorrect The symbols are read, respectively, まる、さんかく and ばつ.


36

○ まる OK; correct; yes; supported; available (like ✔; note that the check mark usually means "wrong" in Japanese examinations) masked/censored character (like * in English used to mask characters in certain words; see this) rival horse; second likely to win (horse race; favorite horse is marked with ◎) win; victory; 白星 (when used as opposed to 黒星 = ● =...


31

The dots, called 傍点【ぼうてん】 (or 圏点【けんてん】), function like italics or underline with the Latin alphabet. They are for emphasis. To see the effect in rōmaji: futatabi kanojo jishin no kuchi kara kiku koto ni naru to wa Update. To answer the question in the comments, 傍点 and ふりがな may be combined (although ふりがな may also be omitted, as in the snippet in the ...


30

There is no strict rule about this. It's best not to use this "~" symbol denoting a range, when it's meant to be read out loud by someone. But if you really have to, you can read the "~" symbol as "から" in many cases. 3~4行ごと さんからよんぎょうごと 2月3~5日 にがつみっかからいつか 15~17階 じゅうごかいからじゅうななかい or じゅうごからじゅうななかい 500~600円 ごひゃくえんからろっぴゃくえん or ごひゃくからろっぴゃくえん Note ...


27

This 金〇 is 金麦, a well-known beer brand by Suntory Ltd. You can see the character 麦 on the can. Here 麦 is masked by the circle in order to avoid issues regarding trademarks or conflict of interest. This is a common tradition in Japanese anime/manga industry. In Japanese, a circle is commonly used to sensor a part of a word for various reasons. See also: Why ...


24

It is in a slightly different order in Japanese. First comes Celsius, then the amount, and degrees at the end. This would be one hundred degrees Celsius written out: 摂氏{せっし}100度{ど} Fahrenheit for example would be similar 華氏{かし}100度{ど} Most of the time saying Celsius is redundant though. If someone asks you what is the temperature, you can just say ...


19

「々」is called「同{どう}の字{じ}点{てん}」it is used to repeat 1 previous character. 人人 = 人々 When there are multiple 同の字点 it means to repeat 'n' previous characters. 已及深更、深更後... = 已及深更、々々後... & 令召右大辨、右大辨應召 = 令召右大辨、々々々應召


17

△ means " almost" or "close" in Japan. 惜しい、もう少しで正解 in Japanese.


16

I think there is no other way to answer your question than: There is only one 々 character; any differences you are seeing are variation in typefaces/handwriting. Fonts can vary quite a bit in their proportions, and 々 is technically a symbol and not a kanji (as far as I'm aware), so that's further reason why typeface designers might treat it differently (...


14

Am I going in the right direction with this interpretation? You got it, friend! 大辞林曰く、 【 】の中【なか】の漢字【かんじ】が「常用【じょうよう】漢字【かんじ】表【ひょう】」にないものには「 ▼ 」、その漢字が「常用漢字表」にはあるが見出【みだ】しに相当【そうとう】する音訓【おんくん】が示【しめ】されていないものには「 ▽ 」を漢字の右肩【みぎかた】に付【ふ】した。 If a given kanji isn't part of the 常用漢字 list, it'll be marked with a ▼. If it is part of the 常用漢字 list but uses a non-standard ...


13

The kaomoji ⊂((・x・))⊃ doesn't have a fixed universal meaning. It always depends on a preference of a person who uses it and the situation where the kaomoji is used. There are at least three possibilities. First, ⊂((・x・))⊃ may represent a rabbit. Especially, Miffy in some cases. ⊂ and ⊃ are her/his ears or arms. A simple kamoji (・x・) has been thought Miffy ...


13

The reading depends on the situation. In a scientific or technical environment Chris's answer is 100% correct. However, in conversational non-technical situations it is read differently. When speaking with someone you can say [度シー]{どしー} for Celsius. However, in Japan the standard for expressing temperature is metric, so there is no need to clarify that ...


12

R → ∞ is usually read R を限りなく大きくする[と・とき] R が限りなく大きくなる[と・とき] I don't think that 「R → ∞ のとき」 is supposed to have a fixed natural pronunciation. You can ignore the の and read it as above, or you could probably read it as [R]{アール} [→]{トゥ} [∞]{インフィニティ} のとき [R]{アール} [→]{ツー} [∞]{インフィニティ} のとき


12

This is supposed to be an iteration mark. This type of iteration mark is usually only used in vertical writing (the traditional layout for Japanese writing). It looks like a big く but is twice as tall. It also exists in Unicode, so I can try to produce it here, although it may not render nicely: や う 〱 (Wikipedia does a better job and has more ...


12

This type of × (indicates a close relationship between two things/people) is usually simply ignored, just as we do not bother to read ❤ or ★ aloud in titles and such. "ラビ×ラビ" is read as ラビラビ as if it were one word. "スシロー×寿司ストライカー" would be pronounced with a small pause between スシロー and 寿司ストライカー. Similar examples from real manga titles: HUNTER × HUNTER ...


10

It is, and it is. It's a way to make references to well-known works without the legal headaches that using the actual copyrighted title would. This is quite common in parodies - Gintama for example has used this trick to no end; the anime does this instead by bleeping out a syllable or two as the character states the name. I could be wrong, but from my ...


10

It is most likely a coding mistake. When products are internationalized, strings in the code are changed depending on the locale of the user. In this case, their template is something like "%s\u00AE:" where %s is the localized string. \u00AE is ®. They obviously haven't filed a trademark on 体感温度, but rather some formula they use that is different from ...


10

These are called 丸囲み文字. 丸囲み数字 or 丸数字 (①②③...) are very common, and their purpose is to write a numbered list of items. The equivalent in English is (1) (2) (3) or i. ii. iii.. Characters ① to ⑳ have been defined long before the introduction of Unicode, and you will see them a lot in Japanese documents. Other 丸囲み文字 are just symbols that means what the ...


8

〒 is the symbol for Postal Code. In japan it has 7 digits (the number you see after it).


8

〇〇 is used to mask/censor part of a word. Why censor this one kanji? What is the meaning of 金〇 In contexts related to otaku-ish hobbies, Xおじさん is recently used to form a slang word that means "(stereotypical) middle-aged male X fan". The nuance is more or less similar to 大きなお友達. For example ガルパンおじさん (fans of Girls und Panzer) and アイカツおじさん (fans of Aikatsu!)...


7

If you take a look at Japanese newspapers, you'll find that the headlines are often stratified in multiple levels. The biggest one is the eye-catcher, and the rest is some supplementary information to explain further situation. Now, the questioned = is mostly used to delimit the "main" and "sub" headlines in the one line environment. See this topic in a ...


7

I myself definitely would read it as 「プラス」 in that dictionary definition. In math, at least I was taught to read it as 「たす」 in first-grade and continued to do so until I entered junior high school where I was required to read it as 「プラス」. Since then, I have been reading it that way except when talking to kids below junior high age (11 or 12). I may or ...


7

This is a common abbreviation style to suggest a certain phrase by enclosing a single kanji in the word. Some frequently used symbols are now officially available on the computer (see 1, 2) due to typographical needs. In this case, ㊙︎ = 秘密【ひみつ】 = "secret, confidential, classified" (often in ads or catch lines) It can be read aloud 丸秘【まるひ】 "circle(d) ひ". ...


7

The レ点 means first read the next character (that is the character below since it was written from top to bottom at that time) then read the previous character. Ex: 帰ル(レ点)国ニ should read 国に帰る. Before, the レ点 was called [雁金点]{かりがねてん} because it looks like a goose which is flying (雁{かり}が飛ぶ姿) . You can see that first the symbol is going down then going up. That ...


6

We say usually only 度 like 100度 because only Celsius is commonly used in Japan, so we don't need to say 摂氏.


6

代紋{だいもん} refers exclusively to the crest of a yakuza group. Think of it as a 家紋{かもん} for yakuzas.


6

〇〇〇〇 implies that various words are applied to 〇〇〇〇. For example, he might say 映画好きのおじさん、公務員のおじさん、車が趣味のおじさん and so on. But he doesn't say it concretely because he would just tell that he is a middle aged man or the word is one that he doesn't want people to know such as 変態, ドスケベ.


5

θ is Theta, a character from the Greek alphabet that makes the 'th' sound as in 'thin.' It does also describe a type of brain wave . . . and as it happens, 'wave' is the meaning of 波. Now as for what its relevance is, some background music claims to specifically stimulate theta wave production in the brain for enhancing this or that function. Whether or not ...


5

In Japanese, R is pronounced aaru (アール) → is pronounced yajirusi (矢印【やじるし】) ∞ is pronounced mugendai (無限大【むげんだい】) I think "n→∞" is often pronounced as follows in the differential and integral. エヌ矢印無限大 enu yajirusi mugendai エヌ無限大 enu mugendai where enu (エヌ) means the letter N. Therefore I guess that "R→∞" is pronounced in the same way. Although, because ...


4

≦ is used everywhere in Japan, unless it's a paper written in English.


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