30 votes

the logic behind "te" in "chotto matte te"

ちょっと待ってて (chotto matte te) literally means "Keep waiting for a while (please)." That て (te) at the end does not mean "I'll be back shortly", at least grammatically. ちょっと (chotto) just means "for a ...
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25 votes
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What's the difference between 歩んでいった and 歩んできた?

I think I don't have enough English vocabulary to express this nuance. So please let me try to explain this visually.   「~てきた」 First of all, 「~てきた」 expresses something in the past. If the speaker at ...
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16 votes
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How do you say "I have been [...]"?

「〜いる」 primer Japanese is honestly far more simple than English when it comes to aspect. In Japanese, the rule is that 「〜いる」 means you are currently (or will be) in some state related to the verb, ...
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13 votes
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「しまう」 as an auxiliary verb

I think the most basic meaning in English is "wind up" or "end up". That seems to work for all of your sentences: どうしても写真は実物より劣ってしまう。 Somehow the photo always winds up being inferior to the real ...
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  • 8,025
11 votes
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Existence verbs in the Kansai Dialect

That statement basically only applies for おる as a simple existence verb. Non-humble おる is very common in Kansai. As a subsidiary verb, various forms including とる/ちょる/よる are commonly used instead of ...
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10 votes
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Meaning of「〜てみたいと思います」

You've gotten the みたい part wrong. What you are seeing is a subsidiary verb (~て)みる, which means "to try doing something (and see what happens)". See: What is the difference between "verb+て+みる"...
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10 votes
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すぎ to mean too much but in a good way

I think the usage of すぎる parallels that of "too much" — usually "too much" means that it's "so much that it's something negative". But colloquially, this can be used for emphasis, as in "so much that ...
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10 votes
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Can't understand 虫に変ってしまっているのに気づいた

Let's break this sentence down. 虫に変ってしまっているのに気づいた At a basic level this sentence breaks up into two fundamental parts: (A) 虫に変った -- Someone/thing changed into a bug and (B) 気づいた -- Someone ...
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9 votes
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新しい発明をした場合、特許を取っておかないと、すぐにその アイデア を使われてしまう

You've basically got it right. The sentence presents a counterfactual, and there are a couple of words/constructions that are there simply to denote a regretful situation. 特許を取っておかない is simply the ...
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  • 2,957
9 votes
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Meaning of 崩れかける

かける can be used as an subsidiary verb to mean "start to [verb]", so 崩れかけた is indeed the 連用形 ren'yōkei (masu-stem) of 崩れる followed by かけた. 崩れかけた門 means "a gate, which has started to ...
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8 votes
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Difference between 帰って来る and 帰る

In this context, 帰る can mean either "to come home" or "to go home". Essentially, it means "to return home", which can imply either direction (coming or going). So, we use the ~てくる construction (...
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8 votes
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Use of くれる with 信じる

I might suggest a slightly different nuance in understanding the [補助動詞]{ほじょどうし} くれる. In question forms, it asks whether someone would do something for the speaker. In the past tense, it expresses ...
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  • 8,025
8 votes

Why is しまいました needed here?

You could argue that the てしまう* doesn't technically add any new information to the sentence in the form of a subject or object, but that's not to say that it's not useful. *This is the same thing as ...
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  • 3,273
8 votes

Help me understand 言ってみただけだよ

〜てみた is the past tense of 〜てみる "to try to [verb]", e.g. 食べてみる to try to eat / to taste / to try [some food] 言ってみただけ usually means something like "just kidding". Of course, literally it means "I ...
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8 votes
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What does ワインを買っていくよ mean?

ワインを買っていく literally means "I'll buy wine and go". You'd say this to mean "I'll buy wine on my way to the place where you are (≂ I'll buy wine and bring it to the place where you are)&...
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7 votes

「しまう」 as an auxiliary verb

This use of しまう is like adding "regrettably", or "unfortunately". It means that the action given in the て form is not a good thing. The fact that pictures don't do somebody justice is not a good ...
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7 votes
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the logic behind "te" in "chotto matte te"

(1) chyotto matte tte (2) why does the tte mean "... and I'll be back shortly". (1) ちょっと待{ま}ってって ↓ 「ちょっと待{ま}って」って ↓ 「ちょっと待って(ください)」って ↓ 「ちょっと待って(ください)」と ↓ 「ちょっと待って(ください)」と(私{わたし}が言{い}ってるのに、...
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6 votes

Use of くれる with 信じる

When someone believes you, they are giving you their belief. English has a similar phrase, "to give the benefit of the doubt." くれる, もらう, and so on are not restricted to physical gifts; they are quite ...
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  • 1,203
6 votes
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もらわれていくの grammar

It's possible to explain the grammar (and that's what OP asked for) もらわ: The nai-form of the verb もらう ("to receive/get/take"). れ: The te-form of the auxiliary verb れる, which forms the passive voice. ...
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