13

As you yourself observe, 月 looks different on its own than as an element in 前, in which it represents a simplification of 舟. So no, they are not identical. As an element in other characters, the element that looks like 月 variously represents other historical elements, including 肉, 舟, 丹, and 月 itself, among others. In some characters the derivation is ...


11

「はね」is what I always hear it referred to as. A web search finds lots of sources to back this up: http://www.bunkei.co.jp/bunkei-app/soragaki/common/images/function.jpg http://www.y-adagio.com/public/standards/tr_fnttrm/fig7_7.gif http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E7%AD%86%E7%94%BB etc


6

Handwritten kanji should follow the shapes of [教科書体]{きょうかしょたい} (textbook fonts). If you're unsure of the handwritten shape, you can utilise font previews to check what they're supposed to be. For example, HG Kyokashotai by Ricoh displays the shape as Handwritten shapes are different from Gothic, because they come from two separate traditions. Handwriting ...


4

In terms of historical development, no, the 月 in 前 wasn't originally the same character as 月 "moon". As you can see in the old Kangxi dictionary here (slightly left of the center of the page, towards the top), the old form of 前 was 止 on the top and 舟 on the bottom. The 止 on the top simplified into 䒑, and the 舟 on the bottom transmogrified into 刖. See also ...


4

I think that in elementary school stroke type (at least はねる) is definitely regarded an important part of learning kanji. For instance, the kanji 竹 is a first-year character and the hook on the last stroke is an important part. I think that most elementary schools would take marks off (i.e. not ◯ but △) for omitting the hook in a test. (The hook is even ...


1

Not a native, however here are a couple of observations on my part between my learning experience and the semester of 書道 I studied when I was in Japan. 大丈夫 has always been a favorite example of mine to use for this topic, because I can't think of any other word in Japanese that composed of more similar, yet different, characters. The first two (大丈), in ...


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