15

Stroke order is important for hand-written Japanese, which includes normal handwriting and various styles of calligraphy. The stroke order gives a flow to the character that can be recognized, even when the character looks very different to its [楷書]{かいしょ} incarnation. For the non-expert, a character written in 楷書 (in the correct order) probably cannot be ...


12

When you want to ask a Japanese person about a kanji/word... they may ask you to write it out. If you trace out the character with a finger on your palm IN THE CORRECT ORDER, they will probably be able to recognize the strokes and answer your question quickly. This shows up way more often than you'd expect. Frankly, it's easier to remember complex kanji if ...


11

The font you're looking for is 教科書体【きょうかしょたい】. It is based on how people handwrite kanji. Textbooks for elementary school students are printed with this font family. After graduating from elementary schools, 明朝体 is primarily used. The following article explains why 教科書体 is better than 明朝 or ゴシック family, for learners. http://www.mitsumura-tosho.co.jp/...


10

For the Kanji 校 is the fifth stroke connected to the sixth stroke? Depends on the country's prescribed standard. Some websites online show the fifth stroke as a vertical line straight down connected to the sixth stroke Japanese regular script handwriting prescribes this shape to be taught in schools. HG Kyokashotai while others (and in Chinese) have ...


9

It's the difference between printing, handwriting, and calligraphy. This element, called nabebuta or keisankanmuri (亠), should be connected and vertical for more formal (printed) styles, and will normally be disconnected and 'diagonal' for calligraphic styles and many handwritten styles. There is not right or wrong unless you are talking about a ...


8

While other L-shaped partials, like @blutorange said in his comment (走鬼麦風爪 etc.), are only stylistic alterations when you use these parts in the left side of a kanji, ⻌ is inherently L-shaped, because it originates from the combination of left-sided ⼻ and bottom ⽌. The fact is widely attested in pre-Qin inscriptions or bamboo (wooden) slip recordings (third ...


8

Edit: Please read this later answer which corrects much of the mistakes that the Japanese sources (that I used) have with more recent and accurate Chinese information. I'll keep this answer around so that it can be seen what was actually corrected. Short answer: While the relevant set of strokes in 壌 is indeed a version of 衣, the lower set of strokes in 展 ...


8

In terms of Chinese calligraphy order, The order that「𠂇」is written depends on the object underneath it. If the component underneath it doesn't exceed the horizontal stroke of「𠂇」(e.g. 右、有、布), then write the vertical stroke first; otherwise (e.g. 友、左) write the horizontal stroke first. 「石」is a different case; it is a top-down construction, so the top part (...


7

If you compare these two links: http://www.vividict.com/WordInfo.aspx?id=2831 for 牛 and http://www.vividict.com/WordInfo.aspx?id=2512 for 生 you can see how these characters have evolved over time. Basically, 牛 starts as the image of the face of a water cow with its horns. so the down stroke came last. Conversely, the life image emerged from 屮 and 土 at ...


7

I feel that at the extremes of stroke order perfection foreigners always seem to be better than native Japanese, maybe because there are just too many who make it a pastime to know all stroke orders for all sorts of obscure 漢字. Unless you are dealing with a 書道 teacher (or school teacher), the general focus is more on whether you are able to remember all ...


6

Well, a han-dakuten isn't a kanji, so I would say that it doesn't matter one way or another. However, the actual kanji 〇 has a "stroke order" (stroke direction?) of a single stroke starting at the top and going counter-clockwise. (Link) So, if 。 does have one, my bet is that's what it is.


6

So, the general spirit of the question has been answered - the key ideas being that radicals (dictionary headers) are not the same as generic components that are found in characters, and thus in different characters what appears to be somewhat similar components should be clearly differentiated and written differently. The general advice given by the other ...


6

If you look at Wikipedia's entry for カタカナ, you can see a chart of the kanji that katakana are thought to be derived from: The katakana ヲ is thought to come from the first three strokes of 乎, so if you try writing those first three strokes quickly, maybe you can imagine how the character came about. Here's the stroke order for 乎: As you can see, ...


5

This page shows an example of typical "proper stroke order of alphabets" which Japanese students may see in basic English textbooks: アルファベットの一般的な筆順 See the stroke order of A, M and W, for instance. Do you think writing M with four strokes is odd? According to this question, Japanese Ministry of Education seems to have determined "the proper stroke order" ...


5

Most of the Chinese, Korean and Japanese people that I speak to say that there are only two strokes in 子 and 辶, saying that nobody does it using three strokes. Well, one thing is for sure, all of the people you spoke to who attended school would have learned these characters with 3 strokes, because officially (education ministries, etc.) they have 3 ...


4

To quote Toritoribe from JapaneseReference (JRef.com) forums: も was made from the 草書体[そうしょたい] of the kanji 毛[モウ, け]. So, the stroke order of も was also from the the stroke order of 毛. Incidentally, the stroke order is different in 楷書体[かいしょたい]. (The link of the wiktionary page doesn't work due to garbled characters. Please search 毛 on Wiktionary. ...


4

Yes, it is not that big a deal to get some ordering wrong. Most of the time, unless someone is watcing you write, they won't even be able to tell how you wrote it! The reason the stroke order is emphasized in Japanese schools is that as you start writing kanjis faster and faster, strokes start to join together. You can see the most beautiful example of this ...


4

I think that in elementary school stroke type (at least はねる) is definitely regarded an important part of learning kanji. For instance, the kanji 竹 is a first-year character and the hook on the last stroke is an important part. I think that most elementary schools would take marks off (i.e. not ◯ but △) for omitting the hook in a test. (The hook is even ...


4

凹 The stroke order you mentioned is the correct one indeed. It can be found in the 新漢語林【しんかんごりん】, for example. This page, kakijun, offers an explanation for the stroke order: Traditionally, ie. based upon the 字彙【じい】 and 康熙【こうき】 dictionaries, 凹 is categorized under the 凵【かんにょう】 radical, so this part is written individually. 凵 is written with | stroke to ...


4

Depending on the style of calligraphy, creative liberties may be taken, and the stroke rules aren't as iron-clad as people like to think. But in this particular case, the reason the final character looks quite different from your expectations is that it's actually closer to the older form that 会 replaced: 會. (You will see this character towards the bottom of ...


4

Certainly there are some characters that have different stroke orders. As for traditional Chinese characters, there are a few radicals that you should watch out for: 糸 In Japanese, the last three strokes are written: middle, left, right. In Chinese, it's left, middle, right. 田 In Japanese, the vertical stroke is written before the last two horizontal ...


4

Some characters indeed have tricky stroke orders even for native speakers (writers?), for instance, 左 is started from the horizontal line but 右 is from the slanted one, and so on. But in your case, it seems to be a simple misunderstanding. I don't know which font you use to browse this site, but typically, 母 and 日 would look like in the image below, ...


4

The primary reason the stroke orders are what they are is that in Japanese, lots of characters are optimised for writing efficiency and/or cursive script. While they seem illogical at first, if you follow these stroke orders, you will eventually start writing more efficiently with less tired hands for longer pieces of writing (while simultaneously ...


3

Does the following explanation help? The logogramme 母 is formed from 女 by adding two dots representing the prominent breasts typical to lactating women (while 女 epitomises a woman tempting a man.) For the record the stroke order for 女 is indicated here -> http://jisho.org/search/%23kanji%20%E5%A5%B3 . So (hopefully) you experience less difficulty in ...


3

Firstly, for ね、れ、わ, the second stroke isn't really just a horizontal stroke, so it's unfair to compare it to あ. The second stroke of ね、れ、わ goes on to change direction and curl later on. Try doing the second stroke first then aiming the vertical stroke. Your mileage may vary. Then for も, in its katakana form モ has the horizontal stroke first. I refer you to ...


3

Stroke orders of hiragana are ultimately based on the stroke orders of kanji from which they derived. Unfortunately, each kanji has its own history, and it's hard to generalize how the stroke order of each kanji was determined. Similar-looking kanji can have different stroke orders (see this for example), and these are basically something you have to ...


3

First off, the jisho.org data is not always correct and comes from work by Jim Breen and WWWJDIC. It's valiant work, but it also includes errors. At least according to kakijun.jp, this is primarily a ten stroke character. According to kakijun, the top should be a 亠(ナベブタ)and then a mouth 口 with a stroke drawn through it. The nine-stroke version listed there ...


3

This will only be a partial answer. First off, neither of the two Kanji you named seem to have 衣{ころも} as their radical (部首{ぶしゅ}), but only as a part. The radical of 展 is 尸{しかばね} [1] and that of 壌 is 土{つち} [2]. Here is a list of Kanji with 衣 as their radical. On a side note, 衤 is actually the same radical as 衣. I'm sure you have seen plenty of Kanji with ...


2

To expand on user27280's answer, it also matters whether you ever want to find things in a kanji / hanzi dictionary using stroke count as a lookup index. The 子 character is clearly listed in character dictionaries as having three strokes (such as the Wiktionary entry here, so if you try to look up this character or any of its derivatives, and you only count ...


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