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11 votes

右 and 石 stroke order differences

In terms of Chinese calligraphy order, The order that「𠂇」is written depends on the object underneath it. If the component underneath it doesn't exceed the horizontal stroke of「𠂇」(e.g. 右、有、布), then ...
dROOOze's user avatar
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11 votes
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Why is there two different ways of writing the 衣 component?

So, the general spirit of the question has been answered - the key ideas being that radicals (dictionary headers) are not the same as generic components that are found in characters, and thus in ...
dROOOze's user avatar
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9 votes

For the Kanji 校 is the fifth stroke connected to the sixth stroke?

For the Kanji 校 is the fifth stroke connected to the sixth stroke? Depends on the country's prescribed standard. Some websites online show the fifth stroke as a vertical line straight down ...
dROOOze's user avatar
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9 votes
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For the Kanji 校 is the fifth stroke connected to the sixth stroke?

It's the difference between printing, handwriting, and calligraphy. This element, called nabebuta or keisankanmuri (亠), should be connected and vertical for more formal (printed) styles, and will ...
BJCUAI's user avatar
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8 votes

Why is there two different ways of writing the 衣 component?

Edit: Please read this later answer which corrects much of the mistakes that the Japanese sources (that I used) have with more recent and accurate Chinese information. I'll keep this answer around so ...
Yannick's user avatar
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6 votes

Ambiguous stroke order/count for 離?

I didn't know this, but this "Radial 114" seems to have a complicated history, making it difficult to definitively say 禸 is either 4 or 5 strokes. The 禸 component is rendered differently ...
naruto's user avatar
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5 votes

Stroke counts for 子 and the 辶 radical?

Most of the Chinese, Korean and Japanese people that I speak to say that there are only two strokes in 子 and 辶, saying that nobody does it using three strokes. Well, one thing is for sure, all of ...
sazarando's user avatar
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5 votes

Is the stroke order native Japanese speakers use for romaji different to those of native English speakers?

This page shows an example of typical "proper stroke order of alphabets" which Japanese students may see in basic English textbooks: アルファベットの一般的な筆順 See the stroke order of A, M and W, for instance. ...
naruto's user avatar
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4 votes

Japanese kanjis and Chinese characters: a request for comparative stroke order

Certainly there are some characters that have different stroke orders. As for traditional Chinese characters, there are a few radicals that you should watch out for: 糸 In Japanese, the last three ...
Blavius's user avatar
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4 votes
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Different stroke order in two similar kanji 戚 and 歴

TL;DR Both Kanji are expected to be written with different stroke order because there is no "厂" in the Kanji 戚. This answer is based only on my own experience. All Kanji similar to 戈 have the ...
jarmanso7's user avatar
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4 votes

Ambiguous stroke order/count for 離?

Stroke numbers is a convention, much like stroke orders. In the case of the letter 禸, it is usually written in 4 strokes but the dictionaries conventionally will list it as a 5 strokes letter, as seen ...
Gui Imamura's user avatar
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3 votes

Stroke Order in Writing

I guess it is partially opinion-based, but the answer is no. Generally it is not possible to infer the stroke order from a glyph on the screen. You can think in the reverse. If it were (always) ...
sundowner's user avatar
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3 votes

Correct order of horizontal and vertical strokes

The primary reason the stroke orders are what they are is that in Japanese, lots of characters are optimised for writing efficiency and/or cursive script. While they seem illogical at first, if you ...
dROOOze's user avatar
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3 votes

Japanese kanjis and Chinese characters: a request for comparative stroke order

AFAIK, the Japanese Ministry of Education (MEXT) defines some general stroke order rules given by importance below (known as 筆順指導の手びき): Generally characters are proceeds from top to bottom (e.g. 三). ...
Tetsuya Yamamoto's user avatar
3 votes
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Stroke order of 繡

繡 (U+7E61) is the kyūjitai form of 繍 (U+7E4D), in the same way 肅 (U+8085) is the kyūjitai form of 粛 (U+7C9B). The stroke order for 肅 (U+8085) is available, on Tangorin for instance: For reference, ...
Kyūshin's user avatar
3 votes

Why is there two different ways of writing the 衣 component?

This will only be a partial answer. First off, neither of the two Kanji you named seem to have 衣{ころも} as their radical (部首{ぶしゅ}), but only as a part. The radical of 展 is 尸{しかばね} [1] and that of 壌 is ...
derpda's user avatar
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3 votes
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Stroke order of cross in kana

Firstly, for ね、れ、わ, the second stroke isn't really just a horizontal stroke, so it's unfair to compare it to あ. The second stroke of ね、れ、わ goes on to change direction and curl later on. Try doing the ...
Flaw's user avatar
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3 votes
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How strictly does calligraphy typically abide by stroke rules?

Depending on the style of calligraphy, creative liberties may be taken, and the stroke rules aren't as iron-clad as people like to think. But in this particular case, the reason the final character ...
Matt's user avatar
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3 votes
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How to reconcile stroke order with font variation on 衷?

First off, the jisho.org data is not always correct and comes from work by Jim Breen and WWWJDIC. It's valiant work, but it also includes errors. At least according to kakijun.jp, this is primarily a ...
virmaior's user avatar
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3 votes

Why is the vertical stroke in the middle of 田 drawn before the horizontal one in the middle?

There is no reason as to why a character is written with a particular order. As Arfrever has pointed out, the current standard in China for 田 is exactly how you imagined it to be: the horizontal line ...
dvx2718's user avatar
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2 votes

Stroke order for han-dakuten

This blog post refers to an elementary school text book for the writing order of a 半濁点. It starts from 6 o'clock and goes around clockwise.
JansthcirlU's user avatar
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2 votes

Stroke order of cross in kana

Stroke orders of hiragana are ultimately based on the stroke orders of kanji from which they derived. Unfortunately, each kanji has its own history, and it's hard to generalize how the stroke order of ...
naruto's user avatar
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2 votes

Stroke counts for 子 and the 辶 radical?

To expand on user27280's answer, it also matters whether you ever want to find things in a kanji / hanzi dictionary using stroke count as a lookup index. The 子 character is clearly listed in ...
Eiríkr Útlendi's user avatar
2 votes

Stroke order of 繡

I could find 嘯 which seems to have the same right part in the YARXI dictionary (English version is called JISHOP but has no online version): I believe the stroke order source is Kakijun. Here's its ...
Igor Skochinsky's user avatar
2 votes
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Stroke order of 濃

Stroke order is: For future reference, this is easily Googleable. See kakijun.com as a resource. For the second part of your question, I don't think there's a "standard" by the government―let alone ...
istrasci's user avatar
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2 votes

Stroke Order of This Kanji: 用

Short answer, while you can find patterns that apply most of the times when it comes to stroke order, for these nuances and little perks you just have to know them by rote. There is hardly any reason ...
dvx2718's user avatar
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2 votes
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Stroke Order in Writing

Theoretically speaking, if you are only going to read or write kanji like a computer san-serif font, a wrong stroke order may not severely hurt readability. But the subtle nuances of each line ending ...
naruto's user avatar
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2 votes
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Why is the stroke order of 牛 different from the 牛 radical in 物?

Easier order to start next stroke is chosen there. Writing letters top-down (and right-to-left) has long been the only way for Japanese until late 18th century (Wikipedia). Try following that way and ...
Ryo's user avatar
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1 vote
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Stroke Order of This Kanji: 用

小学校で、 真ん中の縦棒が下に突き出るときは、縦棒が後 eg 用、申、甲、羊、中、十 真ん中の縦棒が下に突き出ないときは、横棒が後 eg 田・由・角・曲(縦横横) 王・玉、青・美の上(横縦横横の順) と習った記憶があります。
chocolate's user avatar
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