6

If you look at Wikipedia's entry for カタカナ, you can see a chart of the kanji that katakana are thought to be derived from: The katakana ヲ is thought to come from the first three strokes of 乎, so if you try writing those first three strokes quickly, maybe you can imagine how the character came about. Here's the stroke order for 乎: As you can see, ...


5

Here is a page showing a detailed study on citation history of the kanji: http://atonal.fc2web.com/mr/something/gather/otodo_taito/otodo_taito.html According to it, there is a book from 1981 called 姓氏の語源 'Etymology of Surnames', and it has a short story about the kanji, which goes; One day a young guy showed up at a brokerage office, bought a large amount ...


4

The kanji of the koseki register, i.e. kanji that were registered as part of a name, are publicly accessible here. Here is a list of the kanji by stroke count that are registered as part of someone's name. I can't say how often they are used, but at least they are not all just a figment of someone's imagination (or if they were, they at least managed to get ...


3

The only good exercise to practice kanji and get the good proportions is, for me, some drill practice : use graph paper (or print an Excel sheet with a simple grid and, in each box, you draw horizontal, vertical and diagonal lines) and write the same kanji several times in 2x2 or 3x3 box (according to the size you need). To check the strokes order/...


3

Depending on the style of calligraphy, creative liberties may be taken, and the stroke rules aren't as iron-clad as people like to think. But in this particular case, the reason the final character looks quite different from your expectations is that it's actually closer to the older form that 会 replaced: 會. (You will see this character towards the bottom of ...


3

First off, the jisho.org data is not always correct and comes from work by Jim Breen and WWWJDIC. It's valiant work, but it also includes errors. At least according to kakijun.jp, this is primarily a ten stroke character. According to kakijun, the top should be a 亠(ナベブタ)and then a mouth 口 with a stroke drawn through it. The nine-stroke version listed there ...


3

Yes; 12 is correct. You can look up the stroke count from any dictionary, such as JDIC. Look at the [画数] for 満 and you will see that it is 12. (At least I think you are looking at 満)


2

That's two kanji with 1 & 12 strokes (in that order).


1

Yes, I believe the stroke order works as normal, starting from the top down. So with '「' you would write the top horizontal line first then as a separate stroke or carrying on from the left corner of the line do the vertical line. (In modern writing this is usually done in one stroke but I've seen both styles.) Then with the other bracket simply do the ...


1

You may want to look at the guidelines for kanji as mentioned in this post: Why are there two versions of the kanji for 冷? The link there is broken, but this is, I believe, equivalent to the referenced PDF https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bunka.go.jp%2Fkokugo_nihongo%2Fsisaku%2Fjoho%2Fjoho%2Fkijun%2Fnaikaku%2Fpdf%2Fjoyokanjihyo_20101130....


1

The (free) computer application Wakan has the option to specify a rough number of strokes and the radical (or radicals) to narrow down your search -- so if you're convinced it has 12 strokes and it's not showing up, expand the window to 11-13 strokes, etc. This sort of functionality is also available on the (free) KanjiDraw application for Android, and if I ...


1

This is not a definitive answer to your question, but the koseki register (accessible here) does contain the separate pieces as kanji appearing in officially registered names: It is thus definitely possible that there was (or is) someone with the name [䨺龘]【たいとう】. However, the koseki does not have an entry for the ligature of the two characters. We cannot ...


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