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13

Someone else might have better referenced information but I was told these words predate the Second World War when the Japanese government policy was to avoid, possibly even outlaw, all loanwords. (My Japanese father in law told me he was not taught English because it was language of the enemy.) There were also Japanese names for the fielding positions in ...


10

Several points the second-to-last character in 東亞学園バレㅡ部 is U+3161 HANGUL LETTER EU (from Korean), it should be ー U+30FC KATAKANA-HIRAGANA PROLONGED SOUND MARK. This is probably why Google Translate doesn't quite know what to do with it. バレー部 is short for バレーボール部 and means "volleyball team/club" (by the way, ballet is written バレエ) 亞 is the kyūjitai (old ...


10

The All-Japan Senior High School Baseball Championship Tournament is held at 甲子園 stadium every year. There is a custom that losing teams bring a little dirt from 甲子園 stadium back to their school in memory. So, I think his action in this case means the thing you assumed.


8

「ほな前座はこれにて」 → "Well then, that's it for the opening act." 「閉店ガラガラ」 is one of the signature shticks of the comedian 岡田圭右, of the Kansai comedy duo ますだおかだ, typically used at the end of their comedy sessions. (「閉店」 means the closing of a shop and 「ガラガラ」 is here an onomatopoeia for the shutter being pulled down.) The extra 「ガラ」 in the manga could be a ...


8

I think it's 「[寸止]{すんど}め」 (^^) https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%AF%B8%E6%AD%A2%E3%82%81


8

This 小せえもん ("trivial things") is a paraphrase of 国のため(とか). It's read like trivial things such as "for our country" or "For our country"... such trivial things. In other words, this guy is making light of petty nationalism, and seeing something even bigger than Cuba. EDIT: In case you missed it, this が after 凡人共 is a derogatory vocative-like particle, e.g., "...


8

The original meaning of 「雑草{ざっそう}」 is, of course, "weed". When used to describe a person, however, it refers to a non-star or non-elite type whose name no one knew at the beginning. The term is most often, if not exclusively, used to refer to athletes of mediocre ability. Those types, however, occasionally end up very successful for their "weed-like" ...


7

As the dictionary says, 国体 in this context is an abbreviation of 国民体育大会 (National Sports Festival). 山口国体 means the National Sports Festival held in Yamaguchi, in the same way as “London Olympics” means the Olympic Games held in London.


7

It's fine for ski instructors and pretty much anyone else who teaches you something. Using it as an honorific after the name is a little more formal than just using 先生 by itself. But it conveys your respect and appreciation for the fact that they are imparting their knowledge to you. I think it's possible someone might correct you and say that just さん is ...


7

To tell the truth, the only people who can decide what to call the prizes are none other than those who are holding this competition. All anyone here could do is to give examples of what the prizes are "often" named. Example #1: 優勝{ゆうしょう}・準{じゅん}優勝・第三位{だいさんい} Example #2: 第一位・第二位・第三位 Note that 一位・二位・三位 without the 「第」 would be too informal to use on ...


7

It’s 寸止め (すんどめ), from 寸 (a very short distance) and 止める (to stop)


6

シュート is a baseball term. It seems to me like different people have different terms for this pitch (although I'm no baseball expert). According to the Wikipedia article (which references Mr. Baseball, incidentally) and its talk page, it's a "shuuto" or "shootball" in English, but some people may recognize and describe it as a "sinker" or "reverse slider".


6

Japanese usually doesn't distinguish between singular and plural nouns. スポーツ is thus both singular and plural insofar as the singular/plural distinction even makes sense when talking about Japanese. There are several other words, which have a ツ at the end, like ドーナツ or ピーナッツ, but only end it a single T. I conjecture that ツ was chosen over ト (as in スポート, ...


6

(I failed to identify the authoritative article about this, so the following story is based largely on my speculation.) You probably know that 参る is a humble form and means to visit someone with higher status than ourselves. And I think your dictionary also said that 参る can specifically mean "to visit a shrine/temple/grave." (=参拝) The noun お参り always means ...


6

I'm by no means a boxing expert, but I imagine this アウト is probably a reference to the concept of infighting versus outfighting - basically short-range versus long-range combat. Perhaps the boxer being tackled was trying to keep his opponent at a distance ("アウト"), but the enemy's brutish tackle was so forceful that it didn't make any difference (カンケーねー)?


5

予期しない反撃ならいくら打たれ強くても意識を刈りとることができる。 It would be great if you could also check the rest of my translation. Let me break it down into smaller chunks: 予期しない反撃なら "if your counterattack is unexpected," -> "with an unexpected counterattack," いくら打たれ強くても "no matter how tough/resilient your opponent might be," "意識を刈りとることができる "you can knock him out" Put together:...


5

You can use 先生 to anyone who teaches anything in Japan. In traditional sports or arts, Japanese use [師匠]{ししょう}.


5

advantage set / tiebreaker set アドバンテージセット/タイブレークセット game ゲーム set セット match マッチ love (the term used for 0 or a no score situation) ラブ 15/30/40 フィフティーン/サーティー/フォーティー deuce デュース advantage in / advantage out アドバンテージ 太郎(player name) / 二郎(player name) As for advantage in/out, they used to call the players' name who took the point following with '...


5

The second one (it is a determination of who's best in that bout at this time. But there are no referees, no crowd, no medal, and no glory.) is called "練習試合{れんしゅうじあい}" 競争{きょうそう}(kyousou) means competition or bout in a very broad sense. There is not necessarily any implication of a sports match with a crowd, referees etc. "宇宙{うちゅう}開発{かいはつ}競争{きょうそう}" "the ...


5

首ひねり is obviously used to explain スリッピングアウェー, so it shouldn't be another difficult technical term. You can forget the sumo move. 首をひねる (literally "twist a neck") is a common set phrase (not specific to boxing) that means rotating or coking your head. Most of the time this phrase also figuratively means "to think deeply" or "to be puzzled" (similarly to "to ...


5

The answer was in the dictionary - but it's like the 100th entry. I had to scroll down really far. To express the idea of a nutmeg you say 股抜{またぬ}き. The Kanji 股 means "the leg from the knee up" and 抜く means... well There a lot of uses of this word. It basically means "to remove from". It makes sense to use it here, but not if I try to define it in my own ...


5

I think it's not 小せェサル but [小]{ちい}せェ(サルの)島国. ちいせぇ is a rough, slangy pronunciation of ちいさい. (See: What does こまけー mean? / What is じゃねぇか? What is its original form?) この + 小さい + サルの島国 this little island of monkeys 小さい describes (サルの)島国. It's probably referring to Japan. I think サル here is used as an offensive/derogatory word for Japanese people.


4

(credit to Shoko for hint) ゴリ is a nickname of Kunihiro Shimizu 清水邦広


4

From what I understand, 試合 appears to apply mostly (only?) to sports, but is also acceptable and considered correct for board games (chess, 将棋【しょうぎ】, 碁【ご】, etc. - see comments below). 勝負 applies to these situations as well, but also to "fights"/"fighting" (actual, struggle for power, etc.), and to "the game" as in winning the game (the victory). The ...


4

体育 is physical education, a class taken at school where students exercise and play sports. スポーツ is sports in general, including professional sports or sports played as a hobby.


4

体育 = Physical education スポーツ = sports (I don't know Chinese but I am curious, is your Chinese getting in the way?)


4

亞 is an old style character of 亜. 亞 was used conventionally. Plural styles were used together with the textbook before the establishment of Chinese characters for daily use in Japan, and unification was not accomplished about a style. Thus, about individual letters, the style considered to be the old style is not necessarily constant. In addition, the old ...


4

It's called 大銀杏 ōichō, which is a type of 髷 mage (bun/topknot).


4

I believe these are 肋木 rokuboku "wall bars". As to what they are for... to climb up and down. More info on Japanese or English Wikipedia.


4

Weblio offers: 凸助(でこすけ) 額(おでこ)の出た人をあざけっていう。 また、人をののしっていう時もつかう。 でこぼこやろう So basically, it's an insult for a person with large forehead(デコ). It has an additional collision with 凸凹{でこぼこ} (odd/awkward/clumsy). See also Goo (Daijisen) In general, -助 can be attached to various words to make a pejorative (or sometimes affectionate) name/handle for someone ...


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