9

I'm a native Japanese speaker, and I have experienced this, too. Depending on the weather condition, it's possible to listen to Korean AM radio in Japan. When the noise is very strong, I sometimes find it difficult to distinguish whether it's in Japanese or in Korean. I guess this is mainly because of the intonation rather than actual vocabulary. I feel the ...


7

There is no difference in pitch accent between 鉄拳 and 鉄剣, so it purely depends on which word is more familiar to laypeople. Neither is particularly common in daily life, but IMO 鉄拳 is a little bit more familiar because there is a word 鉄拳制裁, which is used outside gaming or history contexts. "Iron sword" is usually referred to simply as 鉄の剣. It's ...


7

Symbol-specific readings such as まるまる or ばつばつ don't work in speech, but other readings (なんとか, なになに, だれだれ, ほにゃらら, ピー) do work in speech to intentionally hide the actual name or to explain some grammar rule. See my previous answer for the list. 誰かさん is another common placeholder used mainly as part of a joke or innuendo. 誰かさんのせいで失敗した。 It was a failure because ...


6

I'm not sure why you are worrying about this, but there is nothing wrong with saying wa twice in succession. It's not unnatural at all. When the topic ends with わ, we simply say 毛皮は kegawa-wa, 川は kawa-wa, チワワは chiwawa-wa, and so on. Nothing special will happen. The topic marker は is commonly omitted in speech anyway, but that's a different phenomenon that ...


5

どうってことない どうってことありません どうと言うこともない etc. are all variations of a set phrase meaning "it's nothing" "it's no big deal". Here どう is just the usual question word and って or と the usual quoting particle. Literally the phrase means that it is not something you would ask/enquire about by saying どう.


4

This usage is called 中止法. You can use it safely in formal speech, but it's rare in casual speech. For example, a mother would almost never say 早く歯を磨き学校に行きなさい to her children.


4

It's related to rather contexts than phonology. Other than the lecture of Japanese history, one normally associates "Tekken" with 鉄拳{てっけん}. I do not think one can associate "Tekken" with 鉄剣{てっけん} at present-day. Japanese Emperor does not have to have an iron sword for their authority at present-day (2000 years ago possibly he uses it). &...


3

However, "食べる", the base verb which means 'to eat', is much more commonly used for the invitation message. No. 食べる is not used as an invitation like ~ましょう/~よう, both of which roughly mean "Let's eat it". The plain form is used in the following situations: To state the speaker's own will 食べる! I'll eat it! As a question to check someone'...


3

また means "again", and じゃあ means something like "so", "okay", or "then". Thus, またね is closer to "see you again" or "see you next time", whereas じゃあね is just "bye". But またね is used fairly casually, and it's usually not a serious promise/suggestion to meet you again. You can also say じゃあまたね.


3

I think normal Japanese people cannot get what "tekken" means if he/she hears it first time, even if that word appears in a rich context. Neither 鉄拳 nor 鉄剣 is something you can easily come up with. 鉄拳 - how can you imagine a fist made of iron? 鉄剣 - a sword is usually made of iron, so that it is quite unexpected you explicitly state that fact. (If ...


2

I am going to attempt an answer from a linguistic angle. It is true that the Korean language and the Japanese language are regarded as two language isolates by many scholars. But efforts to bring them together have not stopped. You may have heard the term Altaic languages. As one of the early and most hopeful attempts to bring Japanese and Korean together ...


2

Genetic relation between languages is usually measured by finding regular correspondences between the two - for example, Fs in native English words like 'father' usually have P in their Latin counterparts like 'pater'. As far as I know, no such regular correspondences between Japanese and Korean have been found. This does not necessarily mean they're ...


1

Chan is not limited to girls, especially when it composes one's nickname, e.g. Tetsuya → Tecchan. (I'm not sure why you find it strange to use it to male friends, to begin with.) That said, if the speaker is female, they may use chan to relatively young female people who the speaker unilaterally knows of and feels familiar with, like celebrities or TV ...


1

Depends also on language: When speaking/writing English, also the norms change a bit. Below if in Japansese If you meet someone first time: certianly "san" or "sama" (unless you know the real title) (But in these times "meet for first time" doesn't mean 1st f2f encounter) If Japan was like Europe or US, I think there would be ...


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