27

What Lyle said is true―you'll want to practice a lot. It's much easier to recognize words and phrases you're used to hearing, not just used to reading. That means ear training, and there's no way around it! Still, we can look at some facts about Japanese pronunciation. I'm a non-native speaker, and one of the trickiest things for a non-native speaker to ...


23

You may be familiar with the concept of sentence-level pitch changes in English; for example when you are asking a question, you end the sentence with a rising pitch to indicate that it is indeed a question. Japanese also has sentence-level pitch changes, but more relevantly to this question, it has word-level pitch changes. Downstep Notation In the ...


16

This doesn't only happen with じゃない > じゃねえ, but generally /ai/ > /ee/, like きたない > きたねえ やばい > やべえ (食{た}べたい = ) 食{く}いたい > 食いてえ As in the other answer, this is extremely informal and in the wrong context can easily be considered plain rude. Xと違う = to differ from X 完成前 = before completion Edit. For completeness, there's also /ae/ > /ee/ e.g. お前 > おめえ /...


15

In my experience, the nature of the relationship and the nature of the communication are both important for knowing when/how to use the plain form and to knowing what the use of plain form signals. In written workplace communication, I never see plain form (I work at a university). In written personal communications (things like Facebook or IM), I rarely ...


13

It's fairly common for both ai and ae to be slurred to ee in colloquial speech. For example: じゃない → じゃねぇ   janai → janee のみたい → のみてぇ   nomitai → nomitee おまえ  → おめぇ    omae → omee てまえ  → てめぇ    temae → temee Your example has an additional contraction. When a vowel is dropped between r and n, you end up with rn. This isn't pronounceable, so it ...


13

「言{い}わんこっちゃない」 is the common colloquial form of: 「言わないことではない」 which is a set phrase meaning: "I told you so.", "Didn't I tell you?", "That's why I told you.", etc. 「やれやれ」 just means "Oh dear!" or something along those lines.


10

Because Chinese doesn't have voiced consonants. In Chinese, voiced /b/d/g/ are just variants of their voiceless counterparts. So you can't hear the difference between voiced sounds and voiceless sounds. It's hard to explain and learn by text. Instead, I recommend you practice it by listening and imitating. The site 首都大学東京 mic-J 日本語教育 AV リソース may be helpful....


10

It's uttered as a colloquial, casual and exclamatory phrase. It's typically used in response to a situation/stimulation that strikes you suddenly. っ is often added after the stem. 高っ! (Wow,) it's expensive! やば(っ)! (Wow,) this is bad! 痛っ! Ouch! きもちわる(っ)! Gross! In formal settings, you should generally avoid this, but no one would blame you for ...


9

けど is the short form of けれども, which could be written け(れ)ど(も), because all of けれども, けれど, けども, けど are used. けども is what, in my experience, is often used in a half formal, half informal setting. It is more refined than けど, but not quite as stiff as けれども.


9

まったく可愛くねー 起こし方しやがって! In colloquial speech, the te-form of a verb at the end of a sentence can express 非難 (reproach/criticism/condemnation) or 不満 (complaint/dissatisfaction). Examples: 「太郎ったら、また脱いだものほったらかしにして!」 「もう、ケンカばっかりして!いいかげんにしなさい!」 「どいつもこいつも、俺をバカにしやがって!」 As a side note, the て-form at the end of a sentence can also express 命令/依頼(command/request)...


9

The phrase 「鬼【おに】は外【そと】、福【ふく】は内【うち】」 is said during the 豆まき mamemaki performed as part of 節分 Setsubun. It is often recited rhythmically [●]{オ}[●]{ニ}[●]{ワ}[●]{ー}[●]{ソ}[●]{ト}○○[●]{フ}[●]{ク}[●]{ワ}[●]{ー}[●]{ウ}[●]{チ}○○ Just writing 「鬼は外、福は内」 just looks/reads very ordinary, so here the small ぁ is added to convey the (rhythmical) sound of the children singing/...


9

I'm a native Japanese speaker, and I have experienced this, too. Depending on the weather condition, it's possible to listen to Korean AM radio in Japan. When the noise is very strong, I sometimes find it difficult to distinguish whether it's in Japanese or in Korean. I guess this is mainly because of the intonation rather than actual vocabulary. I feel the ...


8

感じ(だ) is more colloquial than 感じがする, but I would say they're also slightly different. 感じだ doesn't necessarily have something to do with feelings, e.g. そんな感じ(だ) (It's) something like that Likewise 恋した時ってどんな感じなんですか could be asking about other circumstances than feelings, although feelings would be an obvious topic when talking about love: "What's it like ...


8

We call our pets by their (nick)names most of the time. [ The pet's name (+ chan to show extra affection)]、 こっちおいで。([...], kocchi oide.) You can replace the name with generic terms like 猫ちゃん(neko-chan; kitty) and ワンちゃん(wan-chan; doggy) if you don't know what they are called. 行くよ(iku yo) means "let's go", by the way.


7

The usual placeholder in Japanese is 「なになに」, although type-specific placeholders such as 「だれだれ」 and 「なんとかなんとか」 may be used.


7

Use 「3つのグラフ」 or 「3枚【まい】のグラフ」. Whichever is OK, but maybe the latter will sound just a little bit more formal.


7

It's not a word on its own, but a combination of 来い (imperative "come") and や (see #3 in this dictionary entry). As l'électeur pointed out in the comments, it can be understood as a "tough guy's imperative."


7

けれども is a contradictory conjugation expressing something along the lines of "but" or "however." The ど/ども part in this expression is the part that expresses the contradiction. By a means of shortening one's speech (through laziness, etc.) the different forms came into usage. The shortening is analogous to contractions in English (cannot -> can't). As such, ...


7

snailboat has already provided an excellent response, but I'd like to share an online resource that's pretty useful when trying to figure out the pitch accents of any given text. Just stick your Japanese text into Prosody Tutor Suzuki-kun, tweak the settings as you see fit, hit "analyze", and you'll see a rather accurate pitch analysis of the input text. ...


7

Shifting from polite speech to casual speech is usually a gradual and implicit process when a mature adult makes friends with someone. Depending on the situation, it may take months or even years to switch. Actually I often find myself using some polite sentences when I chat with people who have been my close friends more than 10 years. Here are some random ...


7

やっぱり has several meanings, such as: やっぱり、思った通りだ。 -- It is so, just as I thought/expected/suspected. -> That's exactly what I thought. / I knew it. やっぱり、こっちにします。 -- On second thought, / I changed my mind, I'll pick this one. それでも / なんだかんだ言っても、やっぱり嬉しいです。 -- But I'm happy, nonetheless / all the same / after all. Here in your sentence, I ...


7

I think it might be "バカにはやいじゃないか", where "はええ" is a twisted pronunciation of "はやい". And the sentence means "(You came back) very early, didn't you"


7

There is no difference in pitch accent between 鉄拳 and 鉄剣, so it purely depends on which word is more familiar to laypeople. Neither is particularly common in daily life, but IMO 鉄拳 is a little bit more familiar because there is a word 鉄拳制裁, which is used outside gaming or history contexts. "Iron sword" is usually referred to simply as 鉄の剣. It's ...


6

The extra あ only comes from lengthening the きゃ and could equally well have been written 行きゃ~. Just in the middle of the sentence it looks better as 行きゃあ. The sound is lengthened, because there is a small break when saying the sentence. For example, in 行きゃいいじゃねぇか Why don't you go? a lengthening wouldn't be natural. I presume if you really want, 行ければ ...


6

I feel that Jens' translation is missing the emphasis present in the Japanese text, so here is my version. In my case, I work here because it came through my aunt. I don't think he's making fun of her. ですね just adds a bit of emphasis on 僕, presumably because the conversation was about that girl, and he's switching the topic of conversation to about himself....


6

Yes, right. くそ・クソ・糞 is used in place here for what usually would be すごく, e.g. くそかわ = すごく可愛い くそうめぇ = すごくうまい (=すごくおいしい) etc. (As slang is usually more versatile, there are more expressions with クソ, where すごく isn't a valid substition, e.g. 糞美人. Also, note that くそ isn't traditionally a positive interjection/prefix/..., but traditionally used to embellish ...


6

The difference is audible as Japanese pronunciation has a rhythm based on morae: Every simple kana あ, ぬ, や, etc., is one mora long. (This includes ん!) The contractions りゃ, ぴょ, etc. are one mora long. The long vowel mark (長音符) ー (e.g. in アート) is one mora long. The small つ (っ) counts one mora. So こんにちは is five morae long and should be pronounced that way, i....


6

There are actually three sentences worth discussing (1) あなたはやさしい人です (2) あなたはやさしい人だ (3) あなたはやさしい人 For each sentence, we should consider three dimensions: grammaticality, softness, and politeness. (1) is soft (doesn't sound too direct), polite (shows respect for addressee). (2) is rough (sounds like a point's trying to be made), not polite (doesn't show ...


6

じゃねぇか is just a colloquial form of the tag question じゃないか.


6

Nothing is either wrong or dialectal about 「[誘]{さそ}えていないんだ。」. It sounds 100% natural and it would be said all over the country. It is your 「誘いていないんか。」 that is incorrect. There is no such conjugation as 「誘いて」 in standard Japanese. The correct form is 「誘って」 for the plain and 「誘えて」 for the potential. 「[誘]{さそ}えていないんだ。」 means: "(You) have not been able ...


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