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7

This is a matter of personal taste. If the author did this intentionally, I believe they were trying to emphasize the nuance of ひとつひとつ by covering various possible spellings. Similar examples include this and this. One may also argue that switching kanji/kana too much in a single word is visually displeasing, but I personally doubt that is the main reason. ...


7

胡椒, こしょう, コショウ and コショー refer to the same thing, and they are pronounced the same. The "standard" or "textbook" spelling is 胡椒 or こしょう, but コショウ and コショー are also widely used in the field of cooking. Before explaining why, let's review the basic rule first. In general, traditional kango borrowed from Chinese more than hundreds of years ago are spelled in ...


4

「おはよ」 is just an informal, variant pronunciation/spelling of 「おはよう」. The age of the speaker or audience does not have so much to do with it. Other common variants include: ・「おは」、「おっはー」 ・「おはよっす」 For the informal versions of 「こんにちは」, you will hear/see: ・「ちはー」、「ちはっす」 ・「こんちゃ」 ・「ちゃーす」、「ちゃーっす」 ・「ちーっす」、「ちっす」 With the evening greeting, we seem not to "play ...


3

When I first arrived in Japan in the summer of 1970, 山手線 was known simply as やまてせん - it (suddenly) came to be known as やまのてせん around a year later. Back then, I had never seen it referred to as 山ノ手線. Further, the area where we lived in Yokohama was also known as the Bluff, 山手, やまて, between the 石川町 and 山手 stations along the 根岸線.


2

ボケっと seems to be used primarily for describing someone spacing out and being unproductive, as shown here in these example sentences. https://www.nihongomaster.com/dictionary/entry/101580/boketto-boketto たまにまる一日ぼけっとしていても別に悪い事じゃない。 It's no crime to just idle the whole day once in a while. ボケッとしないで、さっさとメモ書きなさいよっ。 Don't just stand there like a ...


2

If you are asking the question from a purely orthographic aspect, the answer is written on the government's website. Below are excerpts from the public notice issued in 1973 named 送り仮名の付け方. (Underlining in the original text is converted to italic, because there is no way to represent it due to SE's technical limitation.) 語幹が「し」で終わる形容詞は,「し」から送る。 [(I-)...


2

Your question as written is more about spelling. Looking more deeply at your intent, you could be asking whether ~しい adjectives are always derived from 体言 or uninflecting words, or whether they are also derived from 用言 or inflecting words. ~しい adjectives derived from 用言 kuwashii, probably ultimately from ancient verb 構【く】う "to build up" urayamashii, from ...


2

It seems that the only common rule on Korean personal names throughout the Japanese society is that they are not read aloud in on-yomi of kanji. Newspaper companies have different policies on how to write Korean names. NHK recently changed their policies to write them basically in katakana, while Asahi writes kanji along with katakana as furigana. But ...


2

This 'long hyphen' is the elongation mark. It makes the vowel before it long. In English what we call 'long vowels' are qualitatively different from 'short vowels', but in Japanese the sole difference between long and short vowels is their actual length. Long vowels are held for about twice as long as short. ('er' sounds tend to become アー in translation, by ...


2

As you note, there are two modern patterns for spelling //oː// in kana: [CONSONANT or VOWEL KANA ending in //o//] + お, or + う. For the volitional ending in う This was originally the volitional auxiliary / suffix む, which attached to the irrealis or 未然形【みぜんけい】 ("hasn't happened yet") form. For 四段活用【よだんかつよう】 verbs, the irrealis ends in //a//, so the ...


2

The premise of your question – that in native Japanese words long "o" sounds are always spelled by adding お rather than by adding う – is simply incorrect. (Consider the verb [儲ける]{もうける} and the nouns [お父さん]{おとうさん} and [素人]{しろうと}, for example.) That said, the う that occurs in the volitional form ending does in fact derive from the auxiliary verb む, as ...


1

In addition to Aeon Akechi's answer, notice too that the long-vowel mark is written as a horizontal stroke ー when the text is horizontal, and as a vertical stroke | when the text is vertical. (Typography geeks: the vertical stroke above is the U+01C0 pipe character rather than a proper U+30FC long vowel mark displayed vertically, since I can't figure out ...


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