13

It is not 100 percent clear, but I will try to list up the many theories that have been established: Japanese does not have as many verbs as other languages to express subtle nuances of an action. For example, in English, we can say daddle, waddle, trudge and toddle, whereas in Japanese, you would express these nuances with mimetic words like のろのろ、よたよた、とぼとぼ、...


11

The short answer is "it is gibberish". It's not a Japanese word Japanese people recognize. It indeed looks like plefectanswer, as snailboat pointed out in the comment section. See also: Can kanji compounds be formed arbitrarily? But each kanji is easy and has at least some positive meaning. So if you separate each kanji with a nakaguro and write the phrase ...


8

みあ stands for meow, the sound tone of the cat. そのとき、腕の中でしどけなく溶けていた猫が急に身を固くしてみあ、と鳴いて。 The whole sentence means Suddenly, the cat, which was just lying liquidly in man's arm, quickly restored its body, and "meow"-ed out. (forgive my poor translation -w-||)


8

Yes, きゃー represents screams of higher tone, and is clearly feminine or childlike. 黄色い声 is usually きゃー. Gay characters often say きゃー in manga, too. ぎゃー, on the other hand, is not necessarily masculine. When female characters use ぎゃー, it's usually bolder, more urgent, or stronger than きゃー (for example, a dying scream). In general, voiced consonants tend to ...


8

In speech, the word あつい can be pronounced like あちぃ, あっちぃ, あちちち, あっつー, あちぇー, あっつぇー, あちゃちゃちゃ and so on (see this and this). However I don't know what [ott-SOO-ee] represents, and IMHO no variation of あつい sounds even close to English "hot". While Japanese namae vs English name is a famous example of false cognate, this list includes many obviously far-fetched ...


5

In Japanese phonotactics, high vowels (for Japanese, these are i and u) have a certain property: they become unvoiced when surrounded by unvoiced sounds. Since the "u" in desu is surrounded on the left by "s" (voiceless) and on the right by nothing (nothing is also voiceless), the u is now voiceless. However, this rule is not universally followed; for ...


5

As the other answers point out, rendaku doesn't occur in mimetic or onomatopoeic words. The basis is always a particular sound (usually two morae), e.g. ふわ with a particular quality. From this sound the most common mimetic/onomatopoeic words are those obtained by doubling the sound, e.g. ふわふわ but in many cases there is also a common corresponding ...


5

Onomatopoeia vary a lot between languages (for example, nicely illustrated!), and what you think sounds like or unlike the real sound is much more cultural than absolute. If you are referring to new, or at least, not-in-dictionary 擬音語{ぎおんご} in manga etc, and how to tell their meaning, I think they are often in practice just variants on existing sound effects ...


5

ジワリと赤い血が滴り落ちる。 ジワリ is an onomatopoeia of liquid (blood here) oozing out / coming out (of wound, eyes etc.) It can also describe liquid (slowly) soaking (into cloth/fabric). Its variants include: じわじわ, じんわり, じわっ. These are close to ジワリ: じわっ Liquids soaking and oozing じんわり Soaking slowly with sweat or tears (from https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/...


5

Note the author's pronunciation guide [ott-SOO-ee] is only on the word あつい. He is indicating that the sound of "hot" and あつい are similar because of the "ott" sound. To see the similarity, try saying 「hotつい」.


4

This is not a direct answer to your question but let me explain about difference between voicing/devoicing vowels and prolonging vowels. There are several ways to pronounce です or the likes. des (1 syllable non-moraic 3 morae, /de/ is longer than /s/, sounds chopped foreign) des: (1 syllables 2 morae, /de/ and /s:/ are even, sounds eastern-dialect-ish) ...


4

It is impossible to explain exactly when [連濁]{れんだく} happens and when it doesn't. The linked Wikipedia article also explains: In modern Japanese, rendaku is common but at times unpredictable, with certain words unaffected by it. The way I understand it is it happens when two kanji words are combined. For example from the above link: [人]{ひと} + [人]{...


4

It's not a typo. This みあ should be a variation of みゃあ or にゃあ ("meow"), and と is a quotative particle. It will be read like: 猫が急に身を固くして、 The cat suddenly went rigid, 「みあ」と鳴いて。 and said "meow".


3

I would say there is very little conscious thought of whether something is a kun reading or an on reading of a character when speaking normally. That said, if you were to ask someone if a given reading is on or kun, they’d likely be able to answer quickly (if educated). It’s more secondary/subconscious knowledge, but can sometimes come in explicit use if you’...


3

ふかふか is more like an onomatopoeia (the formation of a word form a sound associated with what is named) instead of connecting two words. More examples are: きらきら (shining) [e.g. このダイヤはキラキラしている] はらはら (being nervous) [e.g. ハラハラした] からから (drying) [e.g. のどがカラカラ] かりかり (irritating) [e.g. カリカリしないで] ひとびと is 人々 so it's connecting two words. if you say ...


3

I find The JADED Network to be a good English glossary for Japanese onomatopoeia and mimetic words. Normal Japanese-English dictionaries usually aren't enough to handle the diversity of manga sound effects. If you don't find a word in there, try fiddling with long vowels or small "っ"s a bit. In this case, I've shortened ガキイン Claang to ガキン Clang, and found ...


3

"コージュロイズボンは何の音をするのですか" I would say... コーデュロイパンツはどんな音が{しますか / するんですか / するのですか}?


1

Translating @Chocolate 's comment, I believe she's saying it expresses the sound of one vomiting.


1

We Japanese all know your name here (in Japanese) and here (in English). We usually write Xavier as ザビエル, but the Japanese who could write it as ザヴィエル have increased since English loanwords have increased. The sound of ビ is bi, while ヴィ is vi, so ヴィ seems to express the sound more accurately. But, we are familiar with フランシスコ ザビエル, so I recommend you to ...


1

In both グワラ -and- ドグワララ perhaps グワ(グヮ) is a variant of ガ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Late_Middle_Japanese -- Labialized consonants /kw, gw/ appeared during Early Middle Japanese. During this period, labialized consonants preceding -i and -e merged with their non-labial counterparts.[8] グワラ --> ガラ ---- ガラガラ... is a common onomatopoeia for earthquakes,...


1

シコシコ is the usual sound of masturbation.


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