17

今日という日 (literally "the day called today") is just an emphatic version of "today", or "this very day". This expression is commonly used in formal greetings and poems. (I tried jisho.org but got nothing related to "everyday". How did you come up with "everyday"?)


17

や at the end of a sentence has various meanings, but it's roughly categorized into two. Kansai colloquial copula や (used in place of だ) True sentence-end/interjectory particle や Perhaps you'll see Kansai-ben's や more often, and it's discussed in many existing questions here: I don't understand what やな means at the end of a sentence...? The meaning of ...


14

だ between a verb/i-adjective and と/とか/なんて/etc adds an accusatory and/or shocked tone. In this case, this だ implies words like 死にたい and 愛を伝えたい are inappropriate because they are 軽々しい. From 明鏡国語辞典: だ ❹ 《「…━と」「…━って」「…━なんて」の形で》不適切と思われる相手の言葉を直接引用して示す。多く、非難・意外などの気持ちがこもる。 「なに、行きたくない━と」「参加しない━なんて言わないで…」 It's even used like an accusatory sentence-end ...


12

Yes, the basic idea of these two is "to stop." When we say 「やめる」, it implies that we give it up and it will not resume soon, or even never. For example, when we are playing outside and are to stop playing and go back home, we tend to say 「今日はもうやめよう」 but not 「今日はもうとめよう」, because playing is not likely to restart in the same day. Another example is, when we ...


11

Lyrics in most Japanese songs do not rhyme at the end of each line. Only some J-pop songs influenced by the western culture actively use rhymes. Japanese hip hop songs tend to use rhymes often. For example, lyrics written by Rhymester usually contain a lot of rhymes, as the name suggests :) Listen to this song, and I believe you can easily feel the rhymes ...


8

コンダラ is a slangy word for a man-powered "land roller" to flatten the grounds, like this one. Although the "correct" name of this tool is "(整地【せいち】)ローラー" or something, there are a few high school students who actually call this コンダラ. Even Japanese Wikipedia has the entry for コンダラ. Yes, I'm only half kidding. What is really said in that song is "思い込んだら" (=if ...


8

what is the effect that the artist is trying to achieve? The reason they often use complex kanji and ateji is quite simple, they might think it's cool. Have you ever thought everyone find yourself greater than other people if you'd known a lot of complex words and idioms? People who've written this kind of lyrics will say "To express our delicate and ...


8

を is always an object marker in modern Japanese. It never replaces personal pronouns. Where did you see such a rule? noun + を at the end of a sentence is a fairly common device found in lyrics, slogans, posters and such. In general, it often means "I/We want/need ~" or "Give ~". 彼女にお茶を。 (lit. "(we need) Tea to her") Serve her a cup of tea. 犯罪者に死を! ...


8

Here are the original lyrics: 夜が明けたら一番早い汽車に乗るから 切符を用意してちょうだい 私のために一枚でいいからさ 今夜でこの街とはさよならね わりといい街だったけどね The から in the first line simply means "because", and the first line works as the reason for the second line. "Because I will ride the first train when dawn breaks, please arrange a ticket (for me)." or "I will ride the first train when dawn ...


7

Well, it appears to me that you're confused with the transitivity of 止まる. While the English word "stop" is used both transitively (as in "I stopped the taxi.") and intransitively (as in "Then the taxi stopped."), 止まる is always intransitive. The transitive version is 止める, and its potential form is 止められる. So 俺は止まらない just means "I don't stop" or "I will never ...


7

In late middle Japanese, the actual class of い-adjectives was in fact subdivided into 2 classes, namely ク-adjectives and シク-adjectives. There is remnant of those adjectives even now, though there are mainly to be found in novels or songs in order to add a touch of old. Here, we have 懐かしき, it is the old 連体形 (the base you should use to modify a noun or clause)...


7

Most native speakers haven't heard いやほい before this song. When an announcer asked the lyricist about this word on Nov/11/2015, he said something along the lines of "The meaning is not known and each person has their own way of interpreting it". So it's basically his made-up word which just sounded nice to him. Still, I feel this is meant to sound like a ...


7

というの asks rhetorical questions (it's literally just と, 言う, and の). If your mom told you to keep studying for a long time you might say something like 死ぬまで勉強しろというのか "you want me to study until I die, is that it?!" Or, more literally "are you telling (言う) me to study until I die?!" As you can see it's a bit difficult to line up the tenses between the two ...


6

I might say but even if I wound up knowing everything, what should I do then? My reasons for this different suggestion are two-fold. しまう is a "helping verb" that means "wind up" or "end up" どうすればいい does literally mean "what would be good to do", but generally "what should I do?"


6

Seems to be the imperative-form verb 楽{たの}しめ together with the particle よ. 楽しめ 楽{たの}しむ is the original verb, which means "to enjoy oneself". 楽{たの}しめ, the imperative form, is formed by changing む to め. Imperative-form verbs are blunt, and are used in emergencies, in commands, to be rude, etc. Thus 楽{たの}しめ roughly means "Enjoy yourself!" (...


6

This 興味深いわね is just "That's interesting" or more specifically, "This '意識思考そのものが自律して...' is an interesting assumption." わね is a feminine sentence-end particle which does not necessarily have to be translated, but it's for seeking agreement; "huh?" or "isn't it?" 興味深い never means someone is interested. For example, 彼は興味深い always means "He is an interesting ...


6

It more of less depends on the context, but 手が届く is a common set phrase that means "to be able to reach", "to afford", "to become possible (to achieve something)", etc. Since it's a set phrase, a physical hand is not very important. I don't know where the word "goal" came from by just seeing this line.


6

Isn't it just a 'call'? Like "yahooo!" or "hey hey!" ... at least, that's the sense with which I take sounds like that one. Basically that would mean they're saying "hi" to Harajuku in an uber-genki way. I know that やっほー! is such a sound, and this seems fairly close to that, with extra "cuteness" added in.


6

Remember that ...という (...と言う) means "That which is called...", because it's a useful phrase. Examples: 愛という光 (the Light called Love), 笑顔という幸せ (the happiness which is called a smile). The original phrase you provided is 今日という日 (the day which is called today).


5

Nope, it's optional. The final particle か indicates that the sentence is a question, so that can be seen as the question mark of Japanese. In fact, adding a question mark when there's already a か can seem redundant. That said, you'll find it used a lot anyway, just because sometimes people want to use it. But it is definitely a casual thing, so you'll only ...


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