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11

バカが: "You fool!" が: not a subject marker but a vocative-like particle; see this ガード: [noun] "guard" (in this context, refers to psychological defense or skepticism against the seducer) がばがば: [onomatopoeic na-adj] describes how something is wide open, very loose or leaky に: destination/target marker ("to") なっから: colloquialism for なるから (forget the little-...


8

ぎゃんかわ is slang for “really cute”. ぎゃんかわ → とても可愛{かわ}いい


6

This looks like a slurred or lisped version of すごい ("awesome"). Slurred or lisped pronunciation is often marked in Japanese by using different kana. In the example above, す is swapped out for しゅ. Years ago, my wife had a DoCoMo phone that had an animated bear that would appear and say various things in a funny lisped accent, where all the "s" sounds were ...


6

The sentence is コーヒーいれようか Shall I make some coffee? (入れ-る or 淹れ-る can be used according to your taste) 「いれ」 part is pronounced weak in the original audio, which would explain why you heard it as 「で」.


6

し is the pre-masu form (aka stem) of する, and やがれ is the imperative form of the auxiliary verb やがる which adds the nuance of "damn" to the main verb. See What does しやがって imply? shiyagatte doesn't seem to show up directly in dictionaries for details. So しやがれ on its own means something like "(darn,) do it!". It's essentially a rougher version of しろ. And N + ...


4

What's your problem? - used for asking someone in a threatening way why they are behaving in a way that you do not like or approve of. I think you can say... 何か気に[入]{い}らないことでも あるの/あるわけ/あるのか? 何が 気に入らないの/気に入らないんだよ? 何か文句でも あるの/あるわけ/あるのか? (いったい)なんなの / なんなんだよ!? どういうつもり / なんのつもり(だよ)!? 何考えてんの / 何考えてんだよ!? 頭おかしいんじゃない の/のか!? etc... depending on the ...


4

In the real world, -氏 is definitely a strange name suffix among friends. But Sudō is a teenager girl in a literature club in an anime. Female teenagers generally like inventing a funny way of speaking, and being in a literature club means she is familiar with -氏 used in "serious" literature works. On top of that, this anime itself is mainly targeted at anime ...


3

"It's my duty as student president to correct the behavior of my classmates. [Part I'm not sure about] ... I'll give you some guidance." I think you have understood the nuance of the sentence almost perfectly. I am surprised you can't fill the gap of the part where you are unsure easily since you have understood 「...素行を正す」: "correct the behavior...". and 「...


3

You're right that もの(物) "thing" "stuff" can be contracted to もん, eg 安い[物]{もの}, [良]{い}い[物]{もの}, 欲しい[物]{もの} → 安いもん, いいもん, 欲しいもん etc. in colloquial speech, especially in Kansai. このナイフは安いもん It makes sense, but grammatically speaking it's not a full sentence; to say "This knife is cheap stuff", you need a copula だ/です at the end. このナイフは安い物です。 このナイフは安いもんだ。...


3

You can find the definition here. The usage can be considered "slang" because you won't find this meaning in a dictionary. イタいとは、非常識な言動をする人に対して不憫、みじめに思うこと。 KYな発言をしたり、変な格好をしたり、当人は気づかずにイタいことをしている場合が多い。 当初はネットスラングだったが、今では一般に浸透している。 Translation: イタイ is used to describe a person that is behavior is lacking common sense, and you pity or look down upon ...


3

Dropping of い is a very common colloquialism. It is heard in all sorts of informal situations, and kids probably learn how to say 降ってる before 降っている. You should use the long version in formal settings. There are similar contraction patterns, and てる and ちゃう are especially common among them.


3

I think it doesn't have any meaning and just a title parody of 勝手にしやがれ. 勝手にしやがれ is used as a title of a famous movie and songs, etc. https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%8B%9D%E6%89%8B%E3%81%AB%E3%81%97%E3%82%84%E3%81%8C%E3%82%8C


3

そいつら means "they"(or more precisely "the fellows"). When "ら" is added to a pronoun, it becomes a plural one. For example, 彼 means he, and 彼ら means they. 知らん means 知らない, which is kinda oral expression. The whole sentence means "because I don't know much about them".


2

Basically this 圧 is a figurative and humorous expression that refers to one's "energy" or "aura". The implication of 圧が強い depends on the context. If it's negative, it implies "oppressing", "noisy and annoying", "scary", "over-confident and rude", etc. If it's neutral or positive, it implies "eager", "looks full of confidence", "has strong presence", etc. ...


2

Personally I haven't seen this term being used around in Japanese literature much. The reason why might be because how small most housing is in Japan, the creation of a man cave would be somewhat luxurious. So there might be no real equivalent other than putting your manstuff in the same room as the bedroom or common space. That said: The easiest is to ...


2

As Japanese can be written vertical too, Paisen results in reading the kanji from below to above. It is an internet slang popularized by comedy artists Yano and Yano.


2

不特定多数 is a stiff set phrase typically used in legal or other business-related contexts. I don't think it has a slangy usage like you mentioned, and 不特定多数(を)する doesn't make sense to me. The most common way to say "dating more than one person" is 二股【ふたまた】をかける (or 三股, 四股, ...).


2

So this literally translates into "I landed it." More like "I landed". 上陸 sounds like he came out of the sea, since the 上 implies upwards. For example aircraft etc. are 着陸 rather than 上陸. In English we might say you "landed something" as in you got a good job or achieved something worthwhile. Is that it? As far as I know such an expression doesn't exist ...


1

Its simply a more masculine way of saying you dont want to do X, where X in this case is 死ぬ。死に+たいー>死にたくないー>死にたくねぇ。When attached to the stem of a verb, ~たい means to want to do something, and it conjugates as an いーadjective.


1

Since I haven't watched this movie (I really liked godzilla vs mothra though), I hope I am not missing the context. I need help of this entry for 蒲田{かまた}くん on ニコニコ大百科. There is a dialog(probably on the scene) on it. 「この巨大不明生物が上陸することはありませんので、どうかご安心ください」: "Since this unknown giant creature is not going to land on here, please don't worry about that." ↓ 「...


1

Well, when you say "in a certain context", I'm not unfamiliar with this pattern of laughable line in Japanese stories either, except that the wording would be not quite like a literal translation of English. Examples (all assumed younger male (because you keep using "he") in casual conversation): あれは猫に決まってるだろ。絶対……たぶん……きっと……だよな!? あれはどう見ても猫だろ。絶対……恐らく……...


1

While we don't normally say "不特定多数する", the word "不特定多数" is fairly commonly used to talk of promiscuity or indiscriminateness in romantic/sexual relationships, as in "不特定多数の相手と関係をもつ". So quite possibly you got that expression through this association. If I were to hear someone say "不特定多数する" I'd probably think (after a moment's pause) it's a grammatical ...


1

My current understanding is as follows (thank you Yosh and broccoli forest for the insightful comments). デレる is an ichidan verb probably because it's actually an old verb coined in (or before) the 19th century, when the verb-coining rule was different from that of today. でれる did appear in several works in the 19th century. Although でれる was rare according to ...


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