8

I'd say that it means "you have a discerning eye", that is typically used when someone makes a right choice, or otherwise proves their ability distinguishing the most valuable one from others. I think your first example sounds just right, and the third okay-ish (as a joke), but the second is a little off. The problem with the second one is that you ...


6

One meaning of あがる is something along the lines of "to be finished," "to be over," "to stop functioning," etc. This is the meaning used in 商売が上がったりだ。 "Up" can have a similar meaning in English, such as in the sentence "My contract is up in 3 weeks." It's not negative here, but the meaning of "over" ...


6

Here, いただきます is just "I (humbly) receive/take/accept it", a humble version of もらいます and a polite version of いただこう as well. いただきます as a set phrase is of course related to this, but here it's used in a more literal sense. It's not very common to use keigo to a waiter at cheap izakaya, but it's fine and natural at classy restaurants. And an exchange ...


5

どうってことない どうってことありません どうと言うこともない etc. are all variations of a set phrase meaning "it's nothing" "it's no big deal". Here どう is just the usual question word and って or と the usual quoting particle. Literally the phrase means that it is not something you would ask/enquire about by saying どう.


5

Sentence-end ものだ has many functions, but in your case it adds the nuance of "that's the way it is" with a bit of emotion. Here it is marking the natural conclusion based on the mentioned idea (肥え太らせてから食べてしまうつもり). Meaning of the phase: 筋ってもん it’s basically a masculine-ish way of giving a “that’s the way things are” sort of finality to your ...


4

けっこう has many meanings but you should check it has a core meaning like 'quantity/quality is much' basically. In this case, it means 'ok', 'good', or 'satisfied'. ですので means 'so', 'since' or 'therefore'. The translation would be like this. It's good enough for me to get the answer when you're available, so ... 「...でけっこうですので、...」 is popular phrase because ...


4

I think (自分で)自分の首を締める is the closest and safest. It does convey the meaning of "setting hurdles for themself or putting themself in a more difficult position". 自縄自縛 is also usable, but it's a relatively difficult 四字熟語 that is used mainly in serious essays and literary works. 墓穴を掘る is not wrong but it doesn't necessarily have the above-mentioned ...


4

ドツボにはまる digging him/herself into the deeper hole. 自らの首を締める cut your own throat. 楽屋から火を出す (can’t find similar English phrase.literal translation should be “set fire to your dressing room”) いたちごっこ A vicious cycle. are the most common idioms in my humble opinion.


3

Most native speakers can read 御目出度う御座います without difficulty, and it's not an "archaic" expression like thou art. Still, it's a rare ateji expression that can be used only in limited situations. If used inappropriately, it just looks childish, stupid and inconsiderate to the eyes of native speakers. Please keep in mind that using too many kanji does ...


3

Some particles are often omitted in speech (は, が, を, occasionally に), so 仕方ない is a spoken variant of 仕方がない. Example: これあげるよ. (を is omitted) The sentence-final な is somewhat related to sentence-final ね. Whereas ね is involving the listener as well, often by asking for their confirmation or agreement, な is used to mark "self speech" that doesn't ...


3

This もありか is three words, も + あり + か. も is "also". あり (also written as アリ, from the masu-stem of 有る) is a noun that roughly means "a good idea", "a possible solution", etc. Is アリ in そんなのアリかよ⁉︎ some type of slang? Understanding ありやな か is a question marker, which in this sentence means "..., I guess". ああ、...


3

Since you haven't provided any context, let me point out that ある could be used in several different ways, like stating that something exists (the literal meaning) stating that something is reasonable/common/good (cf. それはないよ). あるちゃあるけど is sometimes used in a longer version あるちゃあるけど、ないちゃない with a loose translation being You can't say that it's not a thing,...


2

I agree. It's an elaborate translation and it's a good way of putting it. Literally it simply says "Today + (at a) busy time + thank you." I also think it's a set phrase given that it's very common in emails and business correspondence.


2

It's "the difficulty of being in a parent-child relationship". It probably refers mainly to the difficulty of being a good father (父親であることの難しさ) in this context, but it also includes the difficulty from the children's point of view. 親子である means "to be a parent and a child (to each other)". 論 is a suffix similar to "-ology" in ...


2

The phrase has very low searchability so that I might miss one or two duplicate questions on this site (somewhat close one), but... 形 has a definition among formal noun usages: 3 物事の結果としての状態。「どっちつかずの―になる」 Formal nouns are usually appositive not translating very well into English: 実行委員の熱心なプッシュが功を奏した形になります lit. "It would be a consequence that the (...


2

御目出度う御座います is one of old-fashioned ways to write the phrase おめでとうございます (now usually in all hiragana), that could already look strange to modern eyes. It is a spelling style that you make use of kanji as much as possible, which is a characteristic of the Edo period convention unlike today's (cf. Why are a high proportion of basic Japanese words written in ...


1

You are mentioning ちびまる子ちゃん, right? If so, I guess "「まる子ウソをつく」" is correct. I guess your book is this. Is this correct? Then, it is not "うん" but "うそ". ウソ{Uso} is similar to "ウン{unn}". These are confusing but different. ウソ{uso} is 嘘, "lie". So, it is translated as "Maruko lies". I am very sorry if ...


1

I can't explain it correctly in grammar terms, but here is simple explanation why you can't use 本を読んでいる人が誰ですか? Case 1. You see man reading book and want to know who is it (is it Takada-san?), so you asking 本を読んでる人は高田さんですか. And answer will be はい、高田さんです。 Yes, he is mister Takada. Case 2. You see two men. One of them reading book, another one drinking juice. ...


1

It's とくる followed by exclamatory-ものだ. ~とくる (literally "it comes out as ~): use of ときては in this sentence What does 「ときている」 mean? What does the word 「とくら」 mean? ~ものだ/~もんだ for exclamation: why ひどい神もいたもんだ means "that's a mean god"? Meaning of こともあるもんです Function of に and meaning of ものだ in this sentence What does "もんだなって" mean? Put ...


1

本日は is Highlighting today's day.  Often used scenes, 'Today is the day of marriage'. Today' is in a larger sense to thank everyone. So the speaker says the day, Still as a short and smart way of saying is "本日は". Meanings are "本日(のeventのために皆様)は". Nowadays , many idioms are used in the business scene. Because it looks like a little but ...


1

Believe you're missing a letter: あるっちゃあるけど It's an extremely informal way of saying: あると言えばあるけど I won't deny that we have it But the underlying connotation is that item is not available for sale/use, or it's reserved for some reason. -- Starfox


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