4

The first strategy is avoidance. No word for "you" is needed in either of your examples: ご存知ですか。〇〇さんですか。 In other cases, the prefix 御 (お or ご) serves instead. ご出身は?お子さんが素敵ですね! In very rare cases where you actually do need to address someone, if you're being formal, そちら can be used in some cases (especially in contrast with oneself - like "and what about ...


4

Ask without あなた (Avoid direct translation). Japanese expressions will work without the pronoun in one-to-one conversations. If I actually saw a person dropped a wallet, then I would reach the person and say in statement form: あの、すみません、財布おとしましたよ。 Um, excuse me. [You] dropped [a/your] wallet. Then again, if I suspect the person dropped a wallet, or if I ...


3

Honorifics are used heavily in Japan. However one culture difference between Japan and South Korea is that age, though important in Japan, is nowhere nearly as much so as in South Korea. So for example, whereas in S. Korea, if two friends are at least one year apart in age, they will refer to each other as younger/older siblings, even if they're not ...


1

Yes, you can use 二人{ふたり} to refer to them. You would use this like: 「二人{ふたり}は東京{とうきょう}へ行{い}ったことがありますか」 If you want to be more polite, お二人、お二人さん would also work, while for keigo, お二方{ふたかた} is more appropriate. To refer to a group of people as "That group (over there)", あの人{ひと}たち, あちらの人たち etc would be pretty standard, whereas あの方々{かたがた}, あちらの方々 etc would ...


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