5

The Japanese pronoun choice is quite context-dependent, but I can confidently pinpoint that this おまえ is "a way to address a junior family member". In this sense, it has no particularly masculine or feminine connotation, and is rather regarded as a conservative (or old-fashioned) usage in the present day (the younger generation is less likely to use ...


4

自分たちだけで is used with the meaning of "all by yourselves". 自分で is often used in situations where you would use a reflexive pronoun in English, for example 自分でできた I managed (to do it) by myself / She managed (to do it) by herself / etc. where the translation of course depends on the context. In 自分たちだけで たち is added to make it plural (ourselves, ...


3

This type of "you" is called generic you. As you have guessed, how to express generic you depends on the language. In Japanese, it's often best not to specify a subject at all. 人 is a word that can be used to explicitly refer to generic you. あなた/そなた almost never appears in traditional Japanese sayings, but it may be understood in a translated ...


3

Honorifics are used heavily in Japan. However one culture difference between Japan and South Korea is that age, though important in Japan, is nowhere nearly as much so as in South Korea. So for example, whereas in S. Korea, if two friends are at least one year apart in age, they will refer to each other as younger/older siblings, even if they're not ...


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