34

The pronoun "anata" is the supposed neutral way to refer to someone whose name you're not aware of, and it's OK to use it to a stranger if you can't think of any other way to phrase the thing you want to ask. The main reason why it's so frequently warned against is that the first instinct of speakers of English (and other Western languages) is to use the ...


16

That's exactly what 敬語(尊敬語・謙譲語) is for... ^^ 日本語を教えていらっしゃるそうですね。 日本語の先生をなさっているそうですね。 日本語の先生でいらっしゃるとうかがいました or お聞きしました。 日本語の先生をしていらっしゃると、XXさんからうかがいました or お聞きしました。 「あなた」などの人称代名詞の代わりに、尊敬語・謙譲語を使って表現しましょう ^^


14

There are several you can use instead: あんた → Basically a familiar version of あなた. [君]{きみ} → Sounds a little more endearing to me, but that may not always be the case お[前]{まえ} → Very informal. Can be considered rude and/or derogatory depending on the context in which you use it and how well you know the person. Lastly, it's very common not to use the ...


13

In a word: imitation. Between couples, often men will refer to themselves as ore. A woman may refer to him (hence "you") by imitating his pronoun of choice. Often ore is not appropriate in various social situations, such as work. As such, some men may refer to themselves as boku. As a result, some people (both male and female), such as bosses (who may refer ...


11

Relative to your spouse's age. In your case, you'd have a 義理の兄(義兄) who is younger than you. And you'd be his 義理の弟/妹 who is older than himself.


11

I would stay away from お前 and 君, unless you know very well what you are doing. あんた is a bit less formal, but still not super-friendly. Actually, the two most simple ways to address friends casually are: No pronoun: whether in a formal or casual context, you only really use a pronoun when there might be an ambiguity otherwise. The person's name is also ...


9

I suggest you read this thread: In actual Japanese society, how often are second-person pronouns used? As I replied there, I would suggest avoiding 2nd person pronouns (including あなた) completely, unless you're absolutely sure what you're doing. As you say yourself, it's common to use the name of title of the person you're talking to, so the only trouble ...


9

The alternative to これ in polite Japanese conversation is こちら (you should find it in most 初級Japanese text books on how to introduce yourself.) To implement this (borrowing Dono's answer) I would say: こちらは私の父です。 This is my father. こちらは私の両親です。These are my parents. こちらは私の友達、由美子です。This is my friend Yumiko. こちらは私のマネジャー(上司)です。This is my manager. You can ...


8

One more addition on あなた. The word is also used by wives to call their husbands (something like dear in English), so just use the person's name, with さん, くん or ちゃん. Depending on the company, everybody may be using nicknames for each other as well. I really do not hear or use the second person pronouns often, or even at all.


8

When addressing children, first person pronouns are sometimes used as second person pronouns. This is done for different reasons, including teaching them to use personal pronouns instead of referring to themselves by name. as a convenient pronoun when you don't know the their name. Using this to address adults seems a bit strange, and I would find it ...


7

The pronoun associations you're looking for—old men use washi, tomboys use boku and so on—are more a trope of fiction than of real life (to an extent, even things like "women's speech" are more a prescription or ideal than an accurate description of real-world speech patterns). Luckily, someone has been studying exactly those tropes: Satoshi Kinsui, who ...


5

You do not need anything. Just list their title and add desu. This is my dad: 父です or オヤジです。 These are my parents: 両親です。 This is my friend (female): 友達です。 This is my manager: マネジャー(上司)です。


5

こちらは 田中さんです。(He is Mr.Tanaka) こちらは is polite way to say he or she


5

It is usual to call them last-name+の+お母さん and last-name+の+お父さん (that means, you refer to your friend by the last-name). It is widespread to call people by their function unless you got closely acquainted with them. Both referencing and addressing the same. お母さん・お父さん basically means "my mother / my father", either in direct or figurative sense. (Update: At ...


4

Ask without あなた (Avoid direct translation). Japanese expressions will work without the pronoun in one-to-one conversations. If I actually saw a person dropped a wallet, then I would reach the person and say in statement form: あの、すみません、財布おとしましたよ。 Um, excuse me. [You] dropped [a/your] wallet. Then again, if I suspect the person dropped a wallet, or if I ...


4

The first strategy is avoidance. No word for "you" is needed in either of your examples: ご存知ですか。〇〇さんですか。 In other cases, the prefix 御 (お or ご) serves instead. ご出身は?お子さんが素敵ですね! In very rare cases where you actually do need to address someone, if you're being formal, そちら can be used in some cases (especially in contrast with oneself - like "and what about ...


3

When speaking about oneself 私{わたし} is always OK for both genders for any age. For boys (and some tomboys) 僕{ぼく} is also used. You may also hear あたし which is used by slightly older females (High School age onwards) in casual situations. A: If you know their name then their name. Else あなた or 君 or 私/僕(if they have already referred to themselves as such). B: ...


3

Just intended as a small remark: the use of お前 does by no means necessarily imply domestic violence, but domestic violence does definitely imply the husband referring to the wife as お前. Maybe this puts it somewhat into perspective.


3

Well, it actually would not be terribly common for a wife to call her husband お前 in the first place (at least in public), I think. The other way around seems perfectly believable to me though. Anyways, in trying to understand why your professor may have been upset by that, all I can guess is that she considers お前 to be so jarringly incorrect for whomever ...


3

This is very good question and I have faced the same issue with my parents-in-law and other family members of friends' families. Chocolate has given us an invaluable answer but to add context, I think the simplest rule to follow is "When in Rome..." or 「郷に入っては郷に従え」, and it does not make any difference whether you are in Kanto or Kansai: In other words, ...


3

When a politician of the political party in power talks to a member of the former Government political party, he/she may say 「お宅の党の政策のつけが今こちらに周ってきているんですよ。」. It is less polite than saying 「~さんの党の政策のつけが・・・」. It sounds equal to say 「あなたの党の・・・」 here but 「お宅」 implies that the relationship between the talking person and the second person is not close and rather ...


3

What's the meaning of a phrase: 御用の向きとは? go-yō means business. It is an honorific expression. muki, in this context, means desire or wish. And towa is grammar that is being used here to express a question. "What is it that you desire?" or "What is your business?". Depending of the fuller context, you may be able to simplify this to "What can I do for you?" ...


3

Honorifics are used heavily in Japan. However one culture difference between Japan and South Korea is that age, though important in Japan, is nowhere nearly as much so as in South Korea. So for example, whereas in S. Korea, if two friends are at least one year apart in age, they will refer to each other as younger/older siblings, even if they're not ...


2

If you know the other party's name or title, by all means use it. Otherwise, omitting the pronoun as @dainichi suggests is the best idea, if possible. However, when you don't know the person you're talking to and you must use something, あなた is perfectly acceptable. For example, it is commonly used to refer to website visitors, or to the person filling out a ...


2

The word あなた is used for people you don’t know the name of, or that you’re very close too. In Japanese, as soon as you know a person’s name, you’re expected to use that, even when talking directly to them. Japanese people on language exchange apps don’t mind using あなた because they expect people to be not good enough in Japanese yet to make that distinction....


2

It's rude depending on who you address and how. Most people aren't on a first-name basis or on a "you" basis unless they are close enough to do so. To assume that you can say あなた to just anyone could make some connections with some people a little too close for comfort. That being said, it's a bit on a person-to-person basis, but I suspect that the reason ...


2

I would go for omitting the pronoun or using the person's name (with whatever honorific you'd usually use). It may be difficult for an English speaker to get used to doing so, but it is perfectly acceptable in casual conversation.


1

Yes, you can use 二人{ふたり} to refer to them. You would use this like: 「二人{ふたり}は東京{とうきょう}へ行{い}ったことがありますか」 If you want to be more polite, お二人、お二人さん would also work, while for keigo, お二方{ふたかた} is more appropriate. To refer to a group of people as "That group (over there)", あの人{ひと}たち, あちらの人たち etc would be pretty standard, whereas あの方々{かたがた}, あちらの方々 etc would ...


1

This is from a mix of personal experience and what I've read online: Generally, it's best to refer to someone by their name. If you don't know someone's name, you'll have to refer to them by a pronoun or a title of some sort (or just avoid referring to them directly through the magic of context). If you know you're going to be acquainted with this person, ...


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