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15

This sentence can technically mean both, but it usually (or almost always) means 1. To mean 2., we normally say 彼は来ないことを知りませんでした。 = He didn't know about the (someone else's) absense. because 彼 is the topic of the whole sentence. In other words, the use of が after 彼 more or less indicates that "彼がこない" is the relative clause which modifies こと.


8

The negative form …したくない means “WANT(NOT(…)).” For example, 山に登りたくない means the speaker wants to avoid climbing a mountain. To express “NOT(WANT(…)),” we have to use other constructs such as 山に登りたいのではない. Compare the following examples. 竜とは戦いたくないが、姫を助ける方法はほかにない。 竜と戦いたいわけではないが、姫を助ける方法はほかにない。 In the first example, the speaker wants to avoid fighting against ...


8

「おまえ、そんな体験したこともねぇのにわかったようなこと言うなっ」 How can I know? When it's spoken, you could easily tell the difference by the pitch accent: わかったようなこと[言うな]{LHL} ← negative imperative わかったようなこと[言うな]{LHH} ← mild emphasis, emotion But in writing it could be ambiguous. So I'd write it as 「言うなっ!」or 「言うなよ」 etc. to clearly show that it's negative imperative. To clearly ...


3

AはBのように多くない is ambiguous if it's "A is not as many as B" or "A is as not many as B". But the former usually takes particle は like AはBのように多くはない.


3

AはBのようにCない。 I think you could interpret that like this. I thought of a few examples. あたしの胸はあなたの胸のように大きくない。 My chest isn't as big as yours. A isn't as C as B. あたしの目はあなたの目のように離れていない。 My eyes aren't as spread out as yours. A aren't as C as B. りんごはオレンジのようにみずみずしくない。 Apples are not as juicy as oranges. A are not as C as B. ...


3

You are right and the wiki is wrong. It's most natural to assume multiple ~も repeated on the same level to be parallel construction, and they all connect to what comes after the last one. See the translation of 雨ニモマケズ below: 雨ニモマケズ not losing to the rain 風ニモマケズ not losing to the wind 雪ニモ夏ノ暑サニモマケヌ not losing to the snow nor to summer's heat There is ...


3

I think it's a negative imperative, also considering the derogative おまえ at the beginning. The english translation would be: Hey, don't talk like you understand when you've never had such an experience.


3

Yes, it can have either meaning. English allows a distinction due to the fact that there are two clauses involved (removing the negative, 'I want' and 'to do (some/any)thing'), so it allows negation in either clause. Japanese has a single clause, and so negation has to end up in a single location. So the distinction is determined purely contextually - ...


2

Understanding the subject of this sentence is a lot easier if we unpack it: The sentence 彼{かれ}が来{こ}ないことを知{し}りませんでした。has an implicit subject, and since it speaks of knowledge, unless it's a narrative, the subject is probably 自分{じぶん}; the self. What has you confused is probably が looking like part of the sentence; it isn't. Splitting the sentence up using ...


2

how can I know that 兄 in 【娘が「これ、借りて良い」と、兄に許可を求めている。】refers to 娘's elder brother rather than 筆者's elder brother? In the first sentence the only subject is 娘 -- marked by が. Ergo, the one who receives permission to borrow from "brother" must be the daughter. And with that referent being set, then without a lot of other context, it's hard to make the ...


2

I think B is saying that Because it's the rules, they can't do it like that (stay silent). Although I mostly base it on examples. And yes, in this case わけには is definitelly short from of わけにはいかない and そういう refers to the proposed "solution".


1

すべて, just like 'all', means 100%, or conversely 'none'. The issues before you are between logical construction in Japanese and non-logical (implied context) construction in the English phrase. The English phrase 'I don't choose all my courses' could just as well logically mean that you choose none of your courses (Don't choose any), but normally there is ...


1

It is very much allowed in Japanese and very commonly used. It takes a positive sentence and converts it into negative and is considered a very forceful way to speak. (could probably guess that with the use of おまえ and ねぇ) You can recognize it by the verb being in base form followed by な. You could say things like: 来るな (Go away) 食べるな (Don't eat [that]) ...


1

I think first "Aの本はBの本のように多くない。" is only translated as "A's books are not as many as B's books." but I noticed that it can be also translated as "A's books are as not many(few) as B's books." If you use comma, it may be easier to understand. "A's books are not as many as B's books." is translated as "Aの本はBの本のように多く、ない。" and if you use "は" it become clearly ...


1

I think 兄 is 娘's elder brother. 1.It is hard to think that 娘 seek to borrow something like clothes of this writer's elder brother, who is an uncle for 娘、because this writer said 同じような体つきのふたり(same frame). 2.I think the reason is because this context indicate it. And if 兄 is this writer's elder brother, I think this writer write 私の兄.


1

Generally speaking, how should AはBのようにCない be interpreted? It might depend on the context, but generally speaking, I think it'd be interpreted as "A is not so C as B" or "Unlike B, A is not C", since the phrase was used that way in almost all the results when I searched for "のように * くない", "のように * くありません", etc. For example: 「紙タバコのように煙くない」 「マラソンのようにツラくない」 ...


1

1 is the correct translation. Your sentence in question, 彼が来ないことを知りませんでした。 can also be written as (私は)彼が来ないことを知りませんでした。 or 彼が来ないことを(私は)知りませんでした。 Which, in both cases, is translated to "I did not know that he will not come." In your original sentence, the subject is implied to be "I" (私), but not explicitly stated. 「は」is almost always used ...


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