11

Like @himself noted, it does mean 葉人をつかまえたんだな. While some dialects do have this change, more importantly it's used to characterise the speaker as a stereotypical wise old male (usually in anime or otherwise in a fiction).


11

It very much depends on what anime. For example, an anime about daily life in the modern world would have generally "normal" Japanese. Conversational snippets sound totally normal, for the most part. You start to have "unnatural" Japanese when the writers, trying to make characters unique, give those people special "quirks" such as always referring to ...


10

No, 見る and 諦めた方 are grammatically subjects, not adverbs in those sentences. Words marked with が should be nouns, of course. As you know, noun + がいい (lit. "~ is good", with exhaustive-listing ga) is usually used when you choose one thing from a few possible options. 「ラーメンとカレー、どっちがいい?」「ラーメンがいい。」 If you want to use this with two or more possible actions (...


10

ニコニコしとれば 悪さは しねえし いつの間にか いねくなっちまうんだ。 This is the same as the following sentence written in the standard Japanese. ニコニコしていれば悪さはしないし、いつの間にかいなくなってしまうんだ。 If you keep smiling, they won't do bad things, and they go away before you notice. The original sentence is not in a particular "dialect", but a typical role language of an old man/lady (aka 老人語). しとる ...


9

This is not really an answer, but I would like to draw the attention to the distinction between speech in fictional work and speech in the real world. In fictional work, there is a set of words (most notably personal pronouns and function words) which are considered to be typical to a certain group of people, regardless of whether the people in the same ...


9

お[戯]{たわむ}れを is mainly heard in samurai dramas. Typically, a samurai or a maid says this to their master in the sense of "You must be joking" or "You're not serious, are you?" In dramas set in modern Japan, an old butler- or detective-like character may say this, too. A more common equivalent in modern Japanese is ご冗談を. EDIT: You may be wondering which verb ...


8

Yes, ~するでない is an old-fashioned and pompous way of saying "Don't do ~!". In modern Japanese, this is a kind of 役割語 (stereotyped role words) which is typically used by noble and/or old people in manga and samurai dramas. This seems to have been used a lot more 100 years ago or so, because I can find many similar expressions (eg. 泣くでない, 穢すでない, 淋しがるでない) in ...


8

In anime and other works of fiction, ぜ sounds more tomboyish, boyish and/or childish. Typical users of ぜ are male kids from so-called 少年マンガ. For example, Satoshi from Pokémon uses ぜ frequently. An adult male character rarely uses ぜ, while ぞ may be used by old male people (and sometimes even by women who are speaking a bit playfully). In the real world, ぞ is ...


8

好きくない is indeed not proper grammar. It is sometimes used by children (and hence in fiction for children or childlike characters), reanalyzing 好き which should be a na-adjective 好き(な) as an i-adjective *好きい, hence *好きくない or *好きかった.


8

This でな is indeed the te-form of だ, followed by な, a masculine sentence-final particle. A sentence-end で can have several different roles. Here, it may be a reason marker (i.e., explaining to someone why he has a sweet), in which case the combination of で + な roughly corresponds to "you know" in English. Or it may be a simple "continuation marker". As this ...


7

In English, we know how to talk like a pirate, even those classical pirates are no more around (aye, pirates still exist, but they tend to speak Somali or whatever...). What is stereotypical accent today often did originally have the speakers, but gradually faded away with the lapse of time only to remain in people's memory. So-called Standard Japanese was ...


7

まかせとき! I think it's Kansai-ben pronunciation for [任]{まか}せておけ / 任せとけ. Here in Kyoto/Osaka, we often say things like... 「まかしとき(ー)」 or 「まかせとき(ー)」 for 「任せておけ」 「おいとき(ー)」 for 「置いておけ」 「やめとき(ー)」 for 「やめておけ」 「だまっとき(ー)」 for 「黙っておけ」/「黙っていろ」 etc...


7

I think it's the usual 終助詞「よ」 (sentence-final particle よ). What I've read is that it attaches directly to nouns in so-called 女性語 (feminine speech). I think it's often used in stereotyped dialogue in fiction, so it's also an example of 役割語 (role words)--though I don't mean to imply that it's only used in fiction, or only by women for that matter! Wikipedia'...


7

I would translate that as: Well, if you really insist, I do have one more. Basically, the speaker does have one more, but is reluctant to mention it. This form of には is mentioned here: (多く「…には…が」の形で、動詞や形容詞を繰り返して)一応その動作や状態は認めるが、それに関連して起こる動作や状態については関知したり容認したりしない意を表す。「推薦状は、書く―書くが、あまり期待しないでくれ」「涼しい―涼しいが、ちょっと冷えすぎる」 (Often times in the form "…には…が", where ...


7

みんべえ is a collapsed pronunciation of みるべえ or みるべ. る in verbs often contracts to ん in colloquial speech when followed by some words, eg: [何]{なに}[見]{み}てるのよ! → [何]{なに}[見]{み}てんのよ! バカなことするなよ。 → バカなことすんなよ。 みる here is a subsidiary verb (補助動詞) and means "try doing~~". The べえ is a prolonged べ. べ is a sentence-final particle (終助詞) mainly used in Tohoku ...


7

It's not a recent slang word but a dialectal form of だって or だな. It's probably still in use in some parts of western Japan*, but it may be best to consider it as a stereotyped role word of old people and people in rural areas. * Both のう and じゃ are actively used in reality in Setouchi region. Some source say じゃて(え) is Okayama dialect.


6

じゃ = だ in some dialects. So this is probably 葉人をつかまえたんだな.


6

まかせとき (or まかしとき[な・ん], etc.) is a colloquial/dialectal version of まかせときなさい (from まかせておきなさい) "leave it to me". In the context of manga, this is most likely role language (in this case "geezer speech"—also note the use of わし).


6

のじゃから is the exact same as のだから; in certain dialects, the plain copula is じゃ rather than だ. This is also used in fictional 'role language' to mark a character as elderly or rural.


6

This 興味深いわね is just "That's interesting" or more specifically, "This '意識思考そのものが自律して...' is an interesting assumption." わね is a feminine sentence-end particle which does not necessarily have to be translated, but it's for seeking agreement; "huh?" or "isn't it?" 興味深い never means someone is interested. For example, 彼は興味深い always means "He is an interesting ...


6

かんーわええのぅ。。 鼻水までもが愛おしく見える。世界いちかわいいよー。 They meant 「かわいいな。」/「かわいいなあ。」, "Wow that's cute." They wrote it in an emphatic, lengthened, and nonstandard (dialectal or classic) way. (な/なあ indicates 詠嘆/exclamation. Related post here.) (What they meant is also clear from the last part of their comment, 「かわいいよー。」) いい often changes to ええ in western dialects. ...


5

While I'm not an old Japanese man, I disagree with your first point. People do choose how to refer to themselves. I've gone through quite a few stages myself, and so do most people around. Some men stick to 私, others use 僕, おれ, おら, or some other personal pronoun. I think two things are at play: Whether it's appropriate to use a given pronoun. Whether you'...


5

According to Wikipedia article 「日本の方言」, ~ちょる means ~ている in western dialect. It says that they use 「音便形+ちょる・ちょー」 for ~ている in 島根県出雲, and 「音便形+ちょる・ちょー」 for ~ている as 完了後の状態を表す相 (perfect aspect) in 岐阜県・奈良県南部・兵庫県播磨・中国地方(出雲除く)・四国地方・九州地方. And according to here in the same article, ~きに is a 接続助詞(conjunctive particle) of 理由(reason) in western dialect. They use 「けん・...


5

The titles are non-standard Japanese (they are creative sentences). I for one think the translations are as good as it gets. In normal contexts they are used like this: 受験失敗したのは自分のせいじゃんよ (Lecturing) The reason you failed was your own fault, isn't it hey? 安っぽい店で飲みたいこともあるじゃんよ (Defending) Sometimes you wanna drink in a cheap place, don't we hey?...


5

Your observation is accurate. There is difference between ぞ and ぜ, though ぜ has almost died out, at least in greater Tokyo. Basically, ぞ just straightforwardly tells one-sided subjective claims, while ぜ has function of confirmation, request, or advice, only in a rude and free manner. ぜ couldn't be used if there's no hearer, that is, you wouldn't speak to ...


5

Yes, it's true and it is placed at the end of a sentence. However we don't use this usage of こと except very elegant and rich ladies. I have never heard this こと in real life. I wonder if there are people who use this こと now.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible