9

Character A: 「ペプシコーラとコカ・コーラどっちがいいかな。」 Character B: 「[何]{なに}を[言]{い}い[出]{だ}すかと[思]{おも}えば・・」 B's line is basically an unfinished sentence that ends in the conditional 「思えば」. To understand this, you need to be able to finish the sentence yourself. (I am sure you have heard an explanation like this before.) First, we know how goofy A's line sounds, don't we? ...


8

There's not really any way of interpreting なかなかいいじゃない as anything but a rhetorical negative. Firstly, you would never ordinarily make いい negative by suffixing じゃない - it would always change to よくない. So this makes it clear that the じゃない is a rhetorical feature affixed to the sentence more generally rather than a negation of いい. And secondly, なかなか generally has ...


6

山田孝雄, a Japanese linguist, called this type of phrase/sentence 喚体句. This is used to make a sentence sound dramatic and vivid. It is especially common in poetry (haiku, lyrics, ...), but this pattern is often seen in live commentary in sports and in the narrative part of novels, too. He called ordinary sentences (ending with a verb/adjective/copula) 述体句. ...


6

喫緊の間かつ極めて秘密裡に作業が行われたため、起草、正本の作成に充分な時間がなく、また詔書の内容を決める閣議において、戦争継続を求める一部の軍部の者によるクーデターを恐れた陸軍大臣・阿南惟幾が「戦局日ニ非(あらざる)ニシテ」の改訂を求め、「戦局必スシモ好転セス」に改められるなど、最終段階まで字句の修正が施された。(source) So, the original line was more direct: 戦局日ニ非(あらざる)ニシテ →(現代訳)日に日に劣勢になっていく →it's getting worse every day And the War Minister Anami Korechika, fearing a coup d'etat from military wanting to ...


3

Rhyme hasn't had much presence through the history of Japanese poetry, so you can say that Japanese poetry is virtually built on blank verses. The underlying meter of traditional Japanese poetry style, or 和歌 (waka) is, as @user4092 has pointed out, the repetition of 5-7 cycles based on quadruple measures. The word 短歌 (tanka; 5-7-5-7-7) literally means "...


3

The 5-7-5 pattern is musically perceived as 5 quavers, 3 eighth rests, 7 quavers, one eighth rest and 5 quavers, making the 4/4 rhythm. example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lps7EaIPEAA


2

Well, I don't think the use of litotes is language(or country?)-specific. Some people are fond of rhetorics, while others prefer direct expressions. That's all, I guess.


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