28

Yes.​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ https://foosoft.net/projects/kanji-frequency/


13

The main issue you're going to run into is explained in this answer, specifically: Avoid learning from manga until you're at a level where you can make the difference between what you hear and what you can say. In spite of this, there is a rough guideline you can use to determine which anime you might be able to use to learn even basic pronunciation.......


11

Google Japan sells the Japanese version of "Google Ngram". Here is the site: http://www.gsk.or.jp/catalog/GSK2007-C But the site is only in Japanese. There might be the same site in English, though. I hope it helps.


11

I managed to collect the data of kanji usage frequencies from various sources: Japanese Wikipedia's snapshot About 12900 files from Aozora Bunko - these are mostly novels, I believe Public tweets from Twitter's Streaming API Online news articles from various sources You can find it here. The one you're looking for is "Aozora". There are files in JSON ...


9

It's strange that no one mentioned that WWWJDIC provides the audio clips for the reading for all the entries (rintaun only mentioned about the pronunciation hiragana). In case anyone misses it (I didn't realize the blue button is a play sound button until later), here is where:


8

複合形容詞 appears to be the generic term for a compound adjective. http://ir.lib.hiroshima-u.ac.jp/metadb/up/kiyo/AN10281005/Hiroshima-IntStudentCenter-kiyo_16_13.pdf - this article covers the various types, and gives many examples. I don't know of any particular lists of these words, but some dictionaries allow you to do a search for words by ending (で終わる) ...


8

囲み文字 are derived from Edo period corporate logos called 表号 which were one of the standard ways of naming or identifying a shop (屋号). You may see in the countryside some companies identify themselves with logos that look like hats or carpenter's squares. There is a good survey of traditional logos from one town here: http://www.kokuhei.com/sa-ken/hyogo.htm ...


7

漢和辞典 is what you want: Shinchosha have just released a Kanji-only dictionary called: Shin'Nihongo Kanji Jiten: http://www.shinchosha.co.jp/jiten/kanjijiten/index.html that includes not only words with origins in China, but also native Japanese words that happen to be scripted in Kanji.


7

Yes, accents change when words are combined/conjugated/etc. I'm not sure if there are any truly sentence-level phenomena, but there is definitely more going on than just "words have the same accent all the time". The NHK dictionary does include a fair bit of information about these rules. To take your examples -- here are some answers I got from consulting ...


7

No, it is not. The Japanese use the Chinese Buddhist canon, which is written in classical Chinese. They read the texts using go-on readings throughout. There are of course translations into Japanese, just as there are into English, but they are only meant for study, not for ritual use, and are not considered canonical.


6

I know a children's song, かえるのうた (The Frog's Song, The Frog Song) I'm not sure if you'd classify it as a lullaby, but it has a simple melody and can even be sung in a round (I think of it as the Japanese "Row, Row, Row your Boat") Here's a link: Frog Song Note: There seems to be a regional difference where the line "Gero gero gero gero" is replaced with "...


6

都道{とどう}府県{ふけん}別{べつ}名字{みょうじ}ランキング - a top 20 surname list of each prefecture published by Hiroshi Morioka, a Japanese surname researcher 同姓{どうせい}同名{どうめい}辞典{じてん} - huge rankings of Japanese names generated from telephone directories


6

Sawa's recommendation that you borrow or rent the movies and look these things up is the best one, because I seriously doubt there's a site that would offer what you're looking for as a matter of course. However, just this once, because you caught me just at the right time, I'll just tell you what the translation is. I felt like making it an exercise of my ...


6

I'm not Japanese, but as far as I know 「むぎゅむぎゅ」depicts squeezing something softly probably more than once as Sawa pointed out. I think you can use it in relation to some texture that has elasticity. The context it is used in can be cute, but is not limited to it. For instance, you see 「むぎゅむぎゅ」used to describe how the dough of a bagel feels. However, it is ...


6

Very insightful point! I think you are right that pitch matters. As a case in point, say if my daughter is reading a textbook aloud in homework and gets a pitch wrong, I would correct her, because it's noticable. On the other hand, Japanese dictionaries written for Japanese do not have the pitch information either, and people from different regions often ...


6

Not all ambiguous pairs can be distinguished by pitch, and we could just as easily provide you with loads of other ambiguous statements where NOTHING other than context could lead you to the right meaning. This kind of thing happens in all languages: in English, if I tell a female friend "You have a nice pair/pear", she'll rely on context (I hope) to tell ...


6

So in short, you're looking for the variations of the question words and what they mean, put into logical groupings. Is that on the mark? Formatting literal tables is a bit of a pain here, so I'll provide bulleted lists for each of the words here to explain in more details instead of using table rows. The form will be as follows: base - meaning base + か ...


6

Your alternate hunch is correct I expect, as I've seen it elsewhere (referred to as 'progressive', there, but I'm not sure if that's a universal term).


6

This is a good example of how important context is. たくみ is a play on words, as they explain on their webpage: El nombre Takumi representa la esencia del restaurante, “artesano”, “maestro”, además de la unión de los dos prestigiosos chefs, Toshio y Álvaro (TA) en el mismo equipo (Kumi), un juego de palabras perfecto que compone el espíritu del restaurante ...


5

I suggest A Guide to Remembering Japanese Characters, by Kenneth Henshall. It gives both the true etymology (if known) and a mnemonic explanation that is more useful to memory. It seems to be exactly what you were looking for.


5

If you forgive the shameless self-promotion, I’ve put together this simple tool to compare a few different kanji etymology websites. You quickly find out that there are lots of disagreement. http://namakajiri.net/kanjigen


5

Section 5 of the ipadic user manual (warning: 271KB PDF) has a list of Japanese parts of speech which seems quite exhaustive. Each entry includes the name for the part of speech in both Japanese and English, an explanation in English and several Japanese examples.


5

I doubt there is an official method or list of words used to explain kanji. If there were an official method that were a lot more efficient, then regular people would probably be using it and nobody would be having problems explaining how things are spelled. Having an official list would mean one would have to memorize thousands of words, one for each ...


4

I use http://nihongoresources.com which includes a lot grammar and pronunciation as well as a dictionary.


4

UmaiKanji has an audio library. It doesn't have anywhere near as many words as a dictionary, so don't expect to get a result for every word you look up. It's not a dictionary actually, but with Rikaikun/chan its useful. I've seen dictionaries on the iPhone that use software to synthesize the readings. Apple and Microsoft do this decently (for words more ...


4

Pretty much every online Japanese dictionary that I know of provides reading, unless you mean something out of the ordinary by "reading." Take the following entry from WWWJDIC for reference: 結論 【けつろん】 (n,vs,adj-no) conclusion; (P) Edit: WWWJDIC also contains audio examples for many common words, as Lukman points out in his answer.


4

One such resource for haiku is Wikisource's collection of Matsuo Basho's Haiku. There are also quite a few pre-modern poetry anthologies transcribed at the University of Virginia's Japanese Text Initiative, including a transcription of the Ogura Hyakunin Isshu (a collection of 100 waka poems by 100 different authors). The original Japanese poetry is all in ...


4

I would think it would be ok though they sometime use pronunciations that are easier for kids to understand, informal japanese, and words typically used by kids. I'm not quite sure what your level is, but watching Love (renai) dramas with japanese subtitles would be my recommendation to improve your listening. Another option is what is called Shadow ...


4

Your Amazon links get mangled by SE, so I cannot really check what is in your rejected options (since the link below is the most obvious one, I wouldn't be too surprised if it is), but just in case: The ever reliable Japanese resource page maintained by Jim Breen offers two datasets compiled from news archive: In 1998 Alexandre Girardi produced a word-...


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