11

I managed to collect the data of kanji usage frequencies from various sources: Japanese Wikipedia's snapshot About 12900 files from Aozora Bunko - these are mostly novels, I believe Public tweets from Twitter's Streaming API Online news articles from various sources You can find it here. The one you're looking for is "Aozora". There are files in JSON ...


9

So in short, you're looking for the variations of the question words and what they mean, put into logical groupings. Is that on the mark? Formatting literal tables is a bit of a pain here, so I'll provide bulleted lists for each of the words here to explain in more details instead of using table rows. The form will be as follows: base - meaning base + か ...


7

No, it is not. The Japanese use the Chinese Buddhist canon, which is written in classical Chinese. They read the texts using go-on readings throughout. There are of course translations into Japanese, just as there are into English, but they are only meant for study, not for ritual use, and are not considered canonical.


6

I suggest A Guide to Remembering Japanese Characters, by Kenneth Henshall. It gives both the true etymology (if known) and a mnemonic explanation that is more useful to memory. It seems to be exactly what you were looking for.


6

This is a good example of how important context is. たくみ is a play on words, as they explain on their webpage: El nombre Takumi representa la esencia del restaurante, “artesano”, “maestro”, además de la unión de los dos prestigiosos chefs, Toshio y Álvaro (TA) en el mismo equipo (Kumi), un juego de palabras perfecto que compone el espíritu del restaurante ...


5

The NHK Accent Dictionary contains a section on compound words, which has entries such as 〜体、〜生、〜力 etc. that explains the pattern they use for connecting to the previous word. It also has a very detailed appendix of how compound words work in general. It doesn't have any compound entries for things like 〜ぽい or 〜さ, but there are many full entries like 荒っぽい、...


5

There is no "passive-causative form" as you suggest in Japanese. Japanese verb conjugations can be "stacked", but not all combinations are possible. There is a correct order you have to respect. If you want the causative-passive meaning described in your textbook, you must always use させられる, not られさせる. つまらない音楽を聞かせられた。(or ~を聞かされた) I was ...


5

I doubt there is an official method or list of words used to explain kanji. If there were an official method that were a lot more efficient, then regular people would probably be using it and nobody would be having problems explaining how things are spelled. Having an official list would mean one would have to memorize thousands of words, one for each ...


4

There is an official document (「異字同訓の漢字の使い分け例」) that covers a number of these. For example: つくる 084 【作る】こしらえる。米を作る。規則を作る。新記録を作る。計画を作る。詩を作る。笑顔を作る。 会社を作る。機会を作る。組織を作る。 【造る】大きなものをこしらえる。醸造する。 船を造る。庭園を造る。宅地を造る。道路を造る。数寄屋造りの家。酒を造る。 【創る*】独創性のあるものを生み出す。 新しい文化を創(作)る。画期的な商品を創(作)り出す。 * 一般的には「創る」の代わりに「作る」と表記しても差し支えないが,事柄の「独創性」を 明確に示したい場合には,「創る」を用いる。 Or ...


4

Certainly there are some characters that have different stroke orders. As for traditional Chinese characters, there are a few radicals that you should watch out for: 糸 In Japanese, the last three strokes are written: middle, left, right. In Chinese, it's left, middle, right. 田 In Japanese, the vertical stroke is written before the last two horizontal ...


4

置 is the Japanese form of the character, used in Japan. , as you gave it, is the Chinese form of the character used in simplified and traditional Chinese. Because of Han unification, most browsers display characters using their Chinese form unless your browser's language tells them to do otherwise (i.e. your browser is in Japanese). Most people have their ...


4

Your first hypothesis simply doesn’t hold. If you thought it might, you may not understand how causative-passives work. If such a thing exists at all, the passive-causative form of 聞く would be 聞かれさせる, not 聞かれらせる. (A passive form is also valid as an ichidan, or Group-2, verb, and a verb in that group takes -させる to form a causative.) If 聞かれさせる means anything, ...


4

I personally read 九日から like ここのかから【LHHHHH】, but ここのかから【LHHHLL】 is also acceptable. 九日の天気 is read both like ここのかのてんき【LHHHHHLL】 and ここのかのてんき【LHHHLHLL】, but I feel the former is more common. Some words are pronunced in two ways depending on the speaker. See: ズボン pronunciation variation & explanation for and Are there any rules to the intonations they are ...


3

"The conjugations have a commutative property ("causative passive" is semantically identical to the "passive causative") This would be categorically false. Can you throw me several examples you think it might work? (by commutative I assume it is meant like how addition is commutative, like 2+3=3+2, i.e. can flip orders) The "...


3

As described in the Wikipedia page, goo is supposedly an abbreviation for 「global network が無限大(∞)に拡大し続ける」 i.e. "global network continues to expand infinitely" (infinity sign is represented by oo)


3

Sometimes a word does have multiple "valid" pitch accent patterns. Daijirin often lists multiple pitch downstep numbers for terms that have them, like, say, the entry for とらまえる, which lists patterns 4 and 3. That said, the Daijirin entry for ここのか only lists pitch pattern 4, with a downstep after the fourth mora. Checking in my local copy of the ...


3

While ssb’s answer is absolutely sufficient, I want to point out—in addition—an English resource that some may not think of in these circumstances. Of the three current, major kanji–English dictionaries (Nelson, Spahn–Hadamitzky and Halpern), Jack Halpern’s New Japanese–English Character Dictionary is actually rather well equipped with information suited ...


3

My friend showed me a pretty satisfying one. It has all the 常用漢字 and also the Kanji are divided into groups 小学1-6 to 中学. It shows what original pictographs today's Kanji had, and each radical is described. Give it a shot. http://okjiten.jp It's completely in Japanese though.


3

There is some useful information on this on the official website http://www.jlpt.jp/: a summary of what organizers consider required for passing N1, and a self evaluation of what successful candidates think they can do. Summary of linguistic competence required for N1 The ability to understand Japanese used in a variety of circumstances. Reading ...


3

Adding on to oals' answer: 仕舞う to finish; to close; to do something completely; to put away; to put an end to Common word, Godan verb with u ending, Transitive verb, Usually written using kana alone Source: edict, searchable on jisho.org It seems only しまう and 仕舞う are in common use (the others being rather obscure), and even among those two, I've only ever ...


2

This isn't really an answer, but I am guessing that Japanese Buddhist scholars regularly read Chinese texts. Since that resource is already available and understandable (with a bit of extra studying) my guess is that a systematic translation into Japanese has not been carried out for all texts.


2

I couldn't find anything closer to what I look for other than Heisig's keywords, and there seems to be no standard list of reference Japanese words as well. Obviously there are dictionaries which list words using each kanji, and it is as "standard" as it can be. I believe the reason for this is the way Japanese people study their own language. When ...


2

I'll leave my old answer up there, and write up what I said in the comments now that you've edited your question. Character variants are uncountable. Officially, you already have: Japanese 新字体, used in official print, according to the 常用漢字 list and 人名漢字 list Japanese 旧字体 that weren't actually phased out fully, especially in names, according to the 人名漢字 ...


2

Kanjicards has online (and printable) lists sorted by grade level, JLPT level or frequency of use. The lists include both types of readings, example words and stroke order: http://kanjicards.org/kanji-lists.html Your rep's quite a bit ahead of mine, so you might be looking for something more advanced... but I've found that those lists are useful for ...


1

AFAIK, the Japanese Ministry of Education (MEXT) defines some general stroke order rules given by importance below (known as 筆順指導の手びき): Generally characters are proceeds from top to bottom (e.g. 三). Generally characters are proceeds from left to right (e.g. 川). When strokes crossing each other, the horizontal stroke usually precedes vertical ones (e.g. 十). ...


1

One low-budget option is the IME. Microsoft's IME (and possibly others) has little comments next to the homonym kanji that help you to choose the correct one:


1

I use Nihongo de Care-navi for Japanese pronunciation with audio. It is actually not a dictionary, but it is for nurses and doctors in Japan to learn English. It however contains a large enough vocabulary that most of the everyday Japanese words are included. It also includes variations of a same word. http://eng.nihongodecarenavi.jp/jpn/search-list.php?cmd=...


1

My opinion: No. Speaking is not tested and the Japanese you're tested on is not stuff you'll encounter in business or in daily conversation. I've passed JLPT 1級 and received J1 on the Business Japanese Test (http://www.kanken.or.jp/bjt/). Studying for the latter was much more useful to me professionally and felt like a better gauge of working Japanese. ...


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