27

The most commonly known ぬ is the helper verb of negation, similar to ない. It is, like ない, added to the [未然形]{みぜんけい}-base of a verb: [立]{た}たぬ=立たない=does not stand. However, in this case we have ぬ being added to 立ち, and there's a different story behind it. Note how the English wikipedia entry for [風]{かぜ}[立]{た}ちぬ says "The wind rises", with no negative meaning ...


15

Verb stem (masu-stem) as a noun can have various meanings depending on the original verb, and you may not be able to determine its meaning without referring to a dictionary. I generally recommend you memorize these, and avoid "coining" a new word unless you're really comfortable with Japanese. Person who does the action (≒ -er/-or) 酔っ払い drunkard のぞき peeper ...


12

As others have said, this is probably really ~やしない, which is transmutation of ~はしない. What this suffix does is usually one of two things: It makes the verb a topic (with は) and then negate it. This is used to bring up the event described by the verb and then saying it won't happen (or isn't happening, have never happened - you get the point). From the ...


12

You are asking what や in 大きすぎやしないか is. I think that it is a colloquial deformation of は, as is explained in this entry in Daijirin. According to this explanation, it was originally 大きすぎはしないか, in which particle は was used to emphasize the part 大きすぎ. When attached to certain verbs, it is often further contracted as in わかりやしない → わかりゃしない, 聞きやしない → 聞きゃしない. ...


12

I believe that when you use the 連用形 as a conjunction, the form is referred to as the 中止形. This usage is described by 中止法. For future reference, here's the definition for 中止形 from 日本文法大辞典 (p.475): 中止形【ちゅうしけい】 連用形の中の一つで、主に中止法として用いられる形。 〔例〕花咲き、鳥歌ふ    空青く、雲白し    波静かに、風爽やかなり ただ、現代語の形容動詞には「(静か)だっ・で・に」の三形があるが特に「(静か)で」の形を中止形という(町は静かで、誰もいない)。...


10

According to the Wikipedia article for 風立ちぬ (小説), this 〜ぬ is not the negative ぬ, but the past/perfect auxiliary ぬ (過去・完了の助動詞) and means "風が立った", or "the wind has risen". However, dictionaries identify it as only a perfect marker (完了), not a past tense marker (過去). For example, take a look at 大辞泉: 動作・作用が完了または実現したことを表す。…た。…てしまう。…てしまった。 This dictionary ...


10

手裏剣をよけざま 「よけ」 should be 避ける(avoid/dodge). 「~しざま」 means "while / the moment / at the same time". It can be rephrased like 「~する際」 「~しながら」. So the sentence appears to be "he did something while he dodged the shuriken". It needs more context to be accurate. さま2 【様・▽方】 [2] 現代では普通「ざま」の形をとる。動詞連用形に付く。  (イ) …する瞬間、…すると同時の意を表す。    「すれ違い―」    「振り向き―」 ...


10

You can add focus particles like は or も to verbs, but in order to do so, you have to split the verb into two parts so that the particle has some place to go. We'll split the verb into its continuative stem (called 連用形 in Japanese) and the verb する. For example:   忘れる   → 忘れ+する   忘れる+も = 忘れもする Or:   忘れない   → 忘れ+しない   忘れない+は = 忘れはしない Your example is a ...


10

Yes, your sentence is correct; you can connect sentences with the continuative form (連用形) of verbs, and here in your example you can use し, which is the continuative form of the verb する. 昨日無事に大学を卒業し、日曜日に国へ帰ります。 You can also use the te-form して: 昨日無事に大学を卒業して、日曜日に国へ帰ります。 (The continuative form 「~し、…」 sounds a bit more literary/formal and less casual/...


9

Yes, [来]{き}おる is a combination of [来]{く}る and [居]{お}る, although 居る in this usage is usually written in hiragana in the modern Japanese. Adding おる after the continuative form of a verb usually means that the speaker is looking down upon the subject of the verb. See sense 〔2〕-[2] in Daijirin and sense 3-① in Daijisen.


8

せん(=せぬ) is the classical version of しない, 'do not'. せ = the imperfective form (未然形) of the verb す, 'do' (す = classical version of する) ん = the negative auxiliary ぬ << derived from the classical negative ず 殺しはせん(連用形「殺し」 + particle は(= here it can be like 'at least') + verb せ + negative ん) is the classical way of saying 殺しはしない, 'I'm not killing / I'm ...


8

こえ is a conjunctive form of the verb 越える{こえる} meaning roughly "to go past", "to go beyond", like 山を越える.


7

The 連用形{れんようけい} ("continuative form") is one of the various 活用形{かつようけい} ("inflected forms") for 用言{ようげん} ("inflectable words") in Japanese. The way I like to explain this is somewhat non-standard, but I think more coherent than how it is usually explained. I will connect this explanation back to the standard way at the end. I think there are two things ...


7

No, that's a ren’yōkei 連用形。 A ren’yōkei mid-sentence is for coordination, like English “he sat, and…”. You can think of it as a literary equivalent of 「こしをかけて、。。。」 Kateikei is what comes before -ba, so in this case it would be kakere-. Full table, with sample context: 未然形: 掛け-  kake- (-nai) 連用形: 掛け-  kake- (-masu) 終止形: 掛ける kake-ru (yo.) 連体形: 掛ける- kake-ru-...


7

お + [masu-stem] + ください is keigo (honorific speech) for [te-form] + ください. This rule works for verbs, which don't have a separate keigo verb, e.g. 切る お切りください If the verb does have a separate keigo form, the formation is different: お見ください → ご覧ください お言いください → おっしゃってください お行きください → いらしてください お来ください → おこしください


7

Often, especially in formal/written Japanese it is customary to connect two sentences using the pre-masu form (let's call it this way to be consistent with the reference linked below), that is, the -masu form without the ”ます” (for example: 食べる → 食べ, 行く → 行き, and so on). Think about this very common sentence for example: 。。。して頂{いただ}き誠{まこと}にありがとうございます。 I ...


7

It almost seems like they are trying to make a negative verb into an adverb but is that possible? Certainly, it's possible. ない conjugates just like an i-adjective. You will see this happen all the time. I'm not sure it's right to call it an adverb in this case but since it has the same form let's abuse the word. As you know, when you want to describe how ...


6

食べる eat 食べない not eat 食べはしない not eat (but do drink) 食べもしない not even eat 食べすらしない not even so much as eat and so on わ as a sentence-ender is used differently in different dialects. With no context here (壊すわ) it's hard to say exactly, but in general, in the standard dialect, it's used for feminine emphasis. [edit] per the comment from blutorange, the ...


6

煮物 is a type of Japanese dish, which consists of food boiled in 出し (broth) and soy sauce, often with 料理酒 (cooking rice wine) and sugar. The name of all types of 煮物 usually end with ~煮, e.g. 筑前煮, 粗煮, etc. 角煮 is a type of 煮物 with cubed meat or fish as main ingredient, similar in looks to meat stew. 刻む is one of the types of chopping food, which usually is ...


6

It has nothing to do with 「[痩]{や}せる」(= to become slimmer); That is for sure. 「してやせん」=「して + や + せん」 「して」, needless to say, is the て-form of 「する」. 「や」 is a colloquial (or regional) pronunciation of 「は」. See here: 大辞林 「や(係助)口頭語で、係助詞『は』がなまったもの。『誰も[来]{き}やしない(こやしない)』『霧で何も見えやしない』」 (Toward the bottom of the page) 「せん」 means 「しない」. 「~~してやせん」=「~~してはいない」 = "would/...


6

より means "from" (similar to から). うけ(受け) is the 連用形 form of 受ける, "to receive", "to be given", etc.


6

The 問われ is not modifying the ロレンス. 連用形 of 用言 can be used to connect clauses or sentences like て形. Here the 連用形 「問われ」 is connecting two clauses/sentences: 「(ロレンスは)不機嫌な顔でまたも逆に問われ(る)」 and 「ロレンスはたじろいでしまう」. You can replace the 連用形 「問われ」 with the て形 「問われて」 without changing the meaning: 不機嫌な顔でまたも逆に問われロレンスはたじろいでしまうが・・・ ≒ 不機嫌な顔でまたも逆に問われて(、)ロレンスはたじろいでしまうが・・・ ...


5

Would it surprise you if I told you that you are likely to have been using Japanese words of the same structure as 「開け口」 for years already --- 「[着物]{きもの}」,「[焼]{や}き[鳥]{とり}」, 「[食]{た}べ[物]{もの}」, etc. The structure is "[連用形]{れんようけい} of a verb + Noun". It is as simple as that. 「[開]{あ}け[口]{ぐち}」= The 連用形 of the verb [開]{あ}ける, which is [開]{あ}け + The noun [口]{くち} ...


5

The basic meaning is the same as 渡さない. There are two differences: The focus particle は adds emphasis to the negative. In order to add the particle, the verb is split into two parts, 渡し+しない, with the particle added in between. The Western negative form せん (from せぬ) is used instead of the Eastern form しない. No, it doesn't mean "cross over a road or bridge"...


5

「Verb in 連用形{れんようけい}(continuative form) +は + しない」 = "would not (verb)" ← rather emphatic 「い」 is the 連用形 of the verb 「いる」. 「誰{だれ}もいはしない」, therefore, means "no one would be (there)" You will encounter this grammar pattern over and over.


5

Maybe writing it out with all needed Kanjis would help: 日本語で続きを読むなら手伝いますよ! "If you read the rest in Japanese then I will lend you a hand." With this, in the next sentence, she's saying: 続きを読んでほしいです。 "I want you to read the rest." Some points: 続き: Remember that this is a noun, not a verb, meaning the remaining, the following, the continuation, etc. ...


5

すまない = sorrowful すまなく = sorrowfully (this is the 連用形 of すまない) 思う = to think (verb) が = but (conjunctive) Literally すまなく思うが = I think sorrowfully but... = I feel sorry but ... The sentence is unfinished. It is up to the reader/listener to guess what follows.


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