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10

Well, as a hint, historically, the first people who'd have any interest in, or practical need for, writing down Japanese in the Latin alphabet weren't Japanese people. See the Nanban trade article in Wikipedia for a good jumping-off point to read about European contact with Japan. I'd bet you dollars to doughnuts that the first Portuguese sailors who ...


6

You are seeing two different methods of romanization. 1) is in so-called wāpuro rōmaji, and 2) is in the (modified) Hepburn system. Neither is more correct than the other; they are exactly the same if written as an ordinary kana-kanji Japanese sentence (どうも有難うございました), and they are pronounced the same. For details, please follow the links. Kunrei: Dômo ...


5

This may be a somewhat controversial, but I'm not really a fan of Sara Backer's take on the spelling. For the lay man, Ng will most likely receive the normal 'N' pronunciation with a hard 'g' sound following it (like in 'golf'). However, knowing what I do about the language, using a soft 'g' actually does get the sound phonetically written into English ...


4

When it comes to localization of proper nouns, especially titles, experts may do something aggressive for various reasons. It's a very creative task, and you have to be very good at both languages and cultures. Check this list of Pokémon and imagine how Japanese names are localized to English. You can see many patterns: Transliteration: ピカチュウ → Pikachu; ...


2

It's not. Kunrei-siki (the updated version of Nihon-siki) is still widely used in Japan, as are non-standard romanisations and mixtures of different systems. They're taught in Japanese education systems and used by companies and government institutions, you'll see them on signs a lot. It was designed in Japan to make logical sense for people already familiar ...


1

They are different things, but very similar. 道路標識 dōrohyōshiki is road signs. 道路(路面)標示 dōrohyōji is road markings. Google doesn't know the difference.


1

I'm going to give a very simple answer: convention. Korean and Chinese had systems like Hepburn, based on foreign phonology, but South Korea and China more or less decreed that a system based on native phonology rather than English approximation was to be used, and it worked in that case. The Japanese government is softly pushing Kunrei, but not putting it'...


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