11

Not really. It would be a rather odd way of asking. この犬の名前は何? is the natural way of asking.


5

No, and if you say that way people probably assume that you try to say "Whose is this dog?". (この犬は誰のですか?) We don't use 誰 for something that is not human.


5

Let's look at each of your sample sentences in turn. 食べ物が美味しさですか? Breaking this down word for word: [食]{た}べ[物]{もの} eating-thing → food が [subject particle] [美味しさ]{おいしさ} deliciousness (as a degree or amount) です [copula]: is, are か? [question marker] Putting this together: 食べ物が美味しさですか? Is food [a degree of] deliciousness? That doesn't make a lot of sense, ...


4

Let's look at your sentences and explore their meaning. 食べ物が美味しさですか This says, "Is the food tastiness?" I don't think that's what you want to say. 食べ物が美味しいんですか This could possibly work, but it still sounds a bit off to me. (But, I'm not a native speaker.) What strikes me odd here is the use of the particle が. Had you written it as ...


4

No, you cannot use it like this. です is used after い-adjectives or な-adjectives or nouns, making it polite. The non-polite form would be だ or nothing for な-adj and nouns, or nothing at all for い-adj. The ましょう construct in question is one of the conjugations of Japanese verbs, namely the volitional form in its polite version. The non-polite volitional form ...


3

They indeed seem to contradict each other. However, the rules described in the preceding pages should not be taken too literally. The book itself offers the following caveat in p286. 本来「のだ」が必要とされる文で「のだ」が使われないことがあります。この場合、「のだ」を使っても問題はないので、学習者は「「のだ」が不要になることもある」ということを知っていれば十分です。 As for the examples you copied from p287, the authors probably needed a few ...


2

乗る on its own only describes the action of mounting or boarding itself. The "destination" marked by に must be a vehicle (or a boat, a horse, etc), not some geographical location. 東京に乗る or 仕事に乗る does not make sense (although "to ride to Tokyo" is a valid expression in English). 車に乗る does not necessary mean you travel to somewhere; you may ...


2

If you don’t know whether or not whatever uttered the voice did so in response to the sound, you might say: その音に反応したのかどうかわからない。 If you suspect it did, you might say: その音に反応したのかもしれない。 のか in your sentence should be understood along these lines. In fact, he could have as well said: その音に反応したのかもしれない。わたしの耳に一つの声が届いた。 or その音に反応したのかもしれないが、わたしの耳に一つの声が届いた。 You ...


2

In this sentence, のか means that the speaker is guessing at a cause. To translate the sentence, "Perhaps reacting to the sound, I heard a voice." Kind of a gross translation, but essentially the speaker is guessing that the voice they hear is from someone vocalizing in reaction to the referenced sound.


2

I'd use レイヤー. It's also what they use in Adobe's official Photoshop tutorials.


1

何台かの車 is valid but 何台の車か isn’t. For example, you can say 何台かの車が走り去った or 何台かの車を買った, but I think 車が何台か走り去った or 車を何台か買った is more natural.


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