Hot answers tagged

27

Because it is like a famous Japanese poet 相田{あいだ}みつを's style of writing. He often used the word だなぁ. And おもさをたいせきでわる is not funny in itself, it is a mathematical sentence. I give a little explanation of this funny. 相田みつを mainly wrote about the importance of life, human life, encouragement and love for afflicted people in his poems with easy words. And だなぁ ...


25

The actual pun is: 「ふとんがふっとんだ」 with a small っ. and not: 「ふとんがふとんだ」 = "A futon is a futon." which is what you wrote. The verb prefix 「ふっ」 is explained here: What does the word 「ぶったてる」mean? To use kanji, the phrase is: 「布団{ふとん}がふっ飛{と}んだ。」 = "The futon was blown off." Thus, it is a legit pun indeed. It is the kind that small kids like to say.


20

It's a pun. In fact, many, many of Dragonball's characters are puns on food (or food-related) items: サイヤ人 Saiyajin from [ヤサイ]{野菜}人 "vegetable people" ベジータ Vegeta from ベジタブル "vegetable" ウーロン Oolong from 烏龍 (type of tea) ピラフ Pilaf ランチ Lunch ヤムチャ Yamcha from 飲茶【やむちゃ】 (snacks & tea) カリン塔【とう】 Korin Tower from 花林糖【かりんとう】 (type of sweets) バーダック Burdock from 牛蒡【...


18

A pun is a play on words exploiting homophones or similar-sounding words. The pun in [布団]{ふとん}が[吹っ飛んだ]{ふっとんだ} The futon was blown off is that it sounds almost like 布団が布団だ A futon is a futon, the latter being a complete tautology. There are many such popular puns, including 犬がいぬ A dog is a dog v The dog is gone イルカはいるか A dolphin is a dolphin v Is there a ...


18

Those are pun-based catchphrases for the job search service by the name of サーチ. First of all, 「あれ」 is the imperative form of 「ある/有る」; therefore, it is a verb. In case someone is wondering, this 「あれ」 has no relation to the 「あれ」("that") as in 「これ/それ/あれ/どれ」. In fact, the two 「あれ's」 are even pronounced quite differently -- 「あれ{HL}」 for the verb and 「あれ{LH}」 ...


10

It should work as a pun for most native speakers (though not many would think it was funny). They would not have any problems reading 「貝獣」 as 「かいじゅう」 even though it is a kun-on combo and they would think it was a shell-related monster. I myself was one of those native speakers described above until I googled upon reading this question today to find out ...


9

I think it's [4]{よ}[6]{ろ}[4]{し}[9]{く}......


9

Is this a thing ever done in Japanese text If you specifically mean "replacing B/C (and only B and C) with the red/squared emoji 🅱️", then, no, that has never been a thing in Japan. I did not know such a phenomenon until today, and its cultural background (according to this) is not something Japanese people are familiar with. Of course people can read 🅱️🅰...


9

Yes, it is しい. There is a bit of a play-on-words happening here. [禿]{は}げ means "bald(ness)", but is being written in katakana on the top line (ハゲ[頭]{あたま}). The entire bottom row says ハゲ〜しい[熱戦]{ねっ・せん}. Here, the しい is being used in conjunction with ハゲ (written in katakana) to represent the adjective [激]{はげ}しい, which means "intense" or "fierce". So 激しい熱戦 ...


8

I don't think there are any call-and-response jokes in Japanese, which is sort of an important feature of knock-knock jokes. As for jokes, which follow a particular pattern, there are simple plays on words, which everyone knows and which involve two words or phrases, which are (at least quasi-)homophones, usually at the beginning and at the end of a sentence,...


8

What is a "corner" shaped like? ;) In addition to drawing your attention by being unusual, it's visually appropriate for the meaning. I'd suggest it's as much/more a graphic design choice than any linguistic emphasis.


7

イヤーンバカーン is an cliched, interjection-like set phrase. いやーん (嫌ーん) literally means "no" or "I dislike it" and ばかーん (馬鹿ーん) is "idiot." It's not a refusal but rather an aged, stereotyped word used when a woman toys or trifle with a man. So the person who said it is childishly and jokingly mimicking a sexy adult woman. Probably it's a wordplay similar to a ...


7

I would say it is a pun on 景気が良い like you guessed. Informally the long vowel mark ー is often used in place of the sound イ, for instance けいこ→けーこ. The expression 景気がいい is used quite a lot. References: 新聞やニュースで、よく「景気がいい、景気が悪い」という言葉が使われます http://diamond.jp/articles/-/17436 景気がいい時は、お給料が上がりやすかったりモノが売れやすかったりというイメージがありますよね。 http://www.k-zai.net/ebasic/020_economy....


7

To me, すみっコ looks cuter and tinier than すみっこ. Similarly, はしっコ、ちびっコ、ひよっコ、いたずらっコ look a bit cuter, more casual/friendly, less serious and/or more playful than 端っこ/はしっこ、ちびっ子/ちびっこ、ひよっ子/ひよっこ、いたずらっ子/いたずらっこ, don't you think?


7

Caveat emptor: My sphere of knowledge is biased towards internet slangs. The phenomenon of snowcloning is common in Japanese, while the term itself is not widely known. 能登かわいいよ能登 -> XかわいいよX (The original phrase made it into a slang dictionary published in 2007) 見ろ! 人がゴミのようだ! -> 見ろ! XがYのようだ! (With Y being ゴミ in most cases) パンが無いならお菓子を食べればいいじゃない -> ...


6

It is a pun. 「[絶好調]{ぜっこうちょう}」 is a word meaning "top form", "best condition", etc. And as you said, 「[蝶]{ちょう}」 means a "butterfly". Types of butterflies are named 「~~蝶」, so there you go.


6

This is a joke played on the common marketing phrase "絶賛〜中". The most common of them is "絶賛発売中" which means it's being sold and getting very high praise. Basically it's sarcasm. EDIT: I shouldn't have said sarcasm. It's more like just a word play with a bit of self deprecation. In particular, the speaker isn't trying to convey how bad the situation ...


6

It is called おやじギャグ and is also called ダジャレ. Here are 100 examples: http://matome.naver.jp/odai/2136602894164225401


6

(Per the asker's request, I'll be including romaji in this answer following Japanese text where it is used.) As Earthling noted, they're finding ways to re-use both versions of the phrase in the sentence. So we started with: アルミ缶の上にあるミカン。Arumi-kan no ue ni aru mikan. It uses the same 5 morae (a ru mi ka n), but changes where the split falls (in this ...


6

This appears to be an onslaught of wordplay. The character's name is 丹生谷【にぶたに】 森夏【しんか】. Her given name is made up from two kanji, 森 and 夏 which both have more than one reading — a kun'yomi (kun reading) and an on'yomi (on reading). 森 "forest" has on'yomi しん and kun'yomi もり 夏 "summer" has on'yomi か and kun'yomi なつ 森夏 is also called モリサマ, which is a play on ...


5

Actually, that is not a crappy translation at all. Literally, 「はっとばすぞ」 means "I'll knock you flying!", so "Don't make me hit you." , while grammatically very different, carries a similar meaning. The dictionary form of 「はっとばす」 is 「張{は}り飛{と}ばす」. 「ぶっ飛{と}ばす」 also has a very similar meaning. "Don't make me kill you!" is also not bad at all as, I hope, you ...


5

This song is full of puns. After seeing the line for a few seconds, I thought this is probably a comical reference to 生きる道 ("way of life"), which is a recurring phrase used in poems and lyrics. It's on jisho, too. There is a famous song titled これが私の生きる道. 道 was replaced by 水 because "road" does not make much sense in water. So it's "water you live in" rather ...


4

I think it's a reference to a famous children's song めだかの学校, where a school of めだか is...er, a school of めだか. 短い答えでごめんなさい。


4

This kind of (rather poor) pun is generally considered to be おやじギャグ. As far as I know, there is no word specifically referring to "AだけにB" jokes. I think the third meaning of that dictionary (であるから、それにふさわしく) can be applied. 「バスケット, therefore I say, スケット」. Sorry, I'm not the right person to answer this part of your question. However, "no pun intended" seems to ...


4

This is actually an interesting topic, here's a quote from wikipedia: In Japanese, hybrid words are common in kango – words formed from kanji characters – where some of the characters may be pronounced using Chinese pronunciations (on'yomi, from Chinese morphemes), and others in the same word are pronounced using Japanese pronunciations (kun'yomi, ...


4

はっとばす is simply a sound change of 張り飛ばす, so はっとばすぞ by itself just means "I'll slap you." 張る can mean "to slap." See the 5th definition here. But note that it's only the latter half of the sentence. The whole sentence is 「あんまじゃじゃ馬してっと、はっとばすぞ」. あんま is short for あんまり ("too much"). じゃじゃ馬する here is something like "to be naughty", "to act as one pleases", "to be ...


3

I think it depends on the context. But maybe... In キン肉マン(kin-niku-man), an old famous manga, many heroes have a kanji on their forehead. Be affected by this manga, writing a kanji on the sleeper's forehead became a common prank in Japan. Typically, the kanji is [肉]{にく}(meats), because this kanji is on the main hero's forehead. Next, there is a proverb 「[食]{...


3

I think it's pretty common, although not necessarily punning so much as just a play-on-words. I can't remember but a couple right now. I'll edit in more later if I remember them. 委員会【いいんかい】の許可を得た。びっくりして「いいんかい?」と答えた。 → I got the committee's permission. Surprised, I responded "(Is it) Really (OK)?". A major station I used to frequent had a nearby ...


3

Quote from this page: I surrender. (私は投降します)→「愛されんだぁ」 日本兵に向けたビラに、軍から取り残された時のための言葉として岡繁樹(1878-1959、日本からの帰化アメリカ人)が書いたもの(上坂冬子著、1989年中央公論社刊「女が振り返る昭和の歴史」より)。 Translation: I surrender (which was made as [愛]{あい}されんだぁ, a play on the English phrase) : Oka Shigeki (1878-1959, a native Japanese who became an American citizen) wrote this on flyers passed out to ...


3

First of all, saying 隅っこ versus just 隅 is something of a colloquialism to begin with. And writing it with a コ instead of こ seems like a stylistic choice by a marketing team who is trying to be as cute as possible. Look at how katakana is used in advertising and you will find many examples of how something normally written in hiragana/kanji has been ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible