5

They sound completely different. Native speakers, at least, will never have the idea that the two sound similar. じ and き are different characters with totally different sounds. Or do you think "G" and "key" sound alike in English? Only 富士通 has an elongated つ at the end, which is a very important distinguishing feature in Japanese. See: ...


5

Historically, 学校 was spelled in kana -- and pronounced as something like -- がくかう. Regular sound changes resulted in modern がっこう: In the ~くか~ in the middle, the //u// sound was unstressed, leading to it gradually being omitted. The //au// vowel combination on the end shifted from //au// (like English ow!) to //ɔː// (like English awe) by the early 1600s, as ...


4

What is 多【おお】き? In brief, this is the Classical Japanese attributive form of modern 多【おお】い. The attributive form or 連体形【れんたいけい】 is the specific conjugation form used when an adjective or verb is used to modify a noun or noun phrase. Deeper dive: What is this -ki ending? All modern -i adjectives have the same -i ending for both the 終止形【しゅうしけい】 ("...


4

So you are one of those people who pick three one-yen coins from their wallet when asked to pay one thousand. It is hard to tell how to differentiate two sounds to someone who can’t differentiate them, not least in writing. One thing I can tell for sure is that under practically no circumstances are あん /aN/ and えん /eN/ pronounced the same. As a general rule, ...


3

Though it is true that //eja// and //ea// tend to be neutralized in fast speech (e.g. 部屋タイプ vs ヘアタイプ), the sound clips on that forvo page all sound appropriate to me. It is a conjecture, but since you said you are Italian, the standard Italian language has a 4-level vowel height distinction; that means you have an open //ɛ// (in vento "wind") and a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible