16

That's exactly what 敬語(尊敬語・謙譲語) is for... ^^ 日本語を教えていらっしゃるそうですね。 日本語の先生をなさっているそうですね。 日本語の先生でいらっしゃるとうかがいました or お聞きしました。 日本語の先生をしていらっしゃると、XXさんからうかがいました or お聞きしました。 「あなた」などの人称代名詞の代わりに、尊敬語・謙譲語を使って表現しましょう ^^


13

I think この usually implies some quality of “me”. You can translate it as “someone like me”. You can insert some adjectives between この and <first person pronoun>. Usually it sounds proud or arrogant, especially in このオレさま. フン、この(偉大なる)ヤング様に勝負を挑むなど、百年早いわ! 天才美少女であるこのアタシが教えてあげるんだから、ありがたく思いなさい! But as Hyperworm pointed out, it can be used in exactly the ...


10

〜たち is a suffix which means more or less "the group to which <someone> belongs". So ぼくたち refers to the speaker as ぼく, but it also refers to the group to which they belong, and it can be used as long as ぼく is appropriate for that one person. In other words, it's not a "plural" marker, so it doesn't matter whether the group is mixed-gender or not. ...


9

Yes, there are several. あたし This is just a casual form of わたし used very commonly by young women. However, it has a more "adult" feel to it then うち, as I feel women between 20 to 40 yrs old use it more. うち This would be second on the list of most common, especially with young teenagers. I wouldn't expect a women past 30 yrs+ to use this form. It ...


9

You'd do better to not look at personal pronouns from a gender-association perspective, despite the misleading idea that they always go hand in hand. The truth is that personal pronouns have more to do with assertion versus humility. The fact that gender has anything to do with it is merely by proxy. As Japanese culture would have it, a male person is ...


7

It is perfectly normal for ぼくたち to refer to mixed-gender groups. For example, when I talk to a third person about something my wife and I are going to do together, I say ぼくたち. Generally, when referring to groups of single or mixed gender of which they are a member, males use ぼくたち (or some other masculine variant like おれたち) and females use わたしたち (or another ...


7

The pronoun associations you're looking for—old men use washi, tomboys use boku and so on—are more a trope of fiction than of real life (to an extent, even things like "women's speech" are more a prescription or ideal than an accurate description of real-world speech patterns). Luckily, someone has been studying exactly those tropes: Satoshi Kinsui, who ...


7

The Tatoeba translation is a natural rather than a literal translation. Literally it's saying more like "I will have my sister go to the station by car to meet you". (迎える is a tricky little word that means to greet/meet someone, but often includes the implication of subsequently escorting them to their destination, so the "pick you up" element is also ...


7

Statistically speaking, I think it's true that 学生じゃないの usually refers to a state ("not being a student"), whereas 白いの usually refers to an object ("white thing"). However, the correct meaning largely depends on the context. Please remember that の meaning one usually replaces a noun representing an inanimate object (i.e., 物). Sometimes の can also represent a ...


7

I think there's some really complex interactions going on here that deal with language, history, and culture on both sides, but if the question is to focus on Japanese language and usage, then there's really a few subquestions: For someone who looks female what does using 僕 communicate? Is there a Japanese way to express "I am a man but look like a woman" ...


6

There is a lot going on in this. The biggest problem is the fact that the structure of the example sentence you found is a bit more advanced than you are used to. The example sentence is right. If you were to break it down 食べている = currently eating 人は = "a person" [the は marks the "person" the focus of the question] います = exists か = ? ...


6

You can use 人: 人は、生きるために食べなければならない。 It makes sense even in English, to a degree - 'a person must eat to live'.


6

「来年【らいねん】日本へ行【い】くと言いました」 can mean (but is not limited to): I said I will go to Japan next year. He/she said he/she will go to Japan next year. I said he/she will go to Japan next year. (ie, I told someone else that he/she will go to Japan) You said you will go to Japan next year. (a bit hard to think of a context where this interpretation is suitable, but ...


6

I think we use the words of status and relationship with speaker than a pronoun when you call a group. For example, 先輩たち、先生たち、高校の友達、近所の人たち、etc. And we also use a person name of the group like 田中さんたち、鈴木さんたち. In addition 彼ら can be used irrespective of gender but if you want to make clear a group is mixed man and woman, you can say 彼、彼女ら(たち)は.


6

For a group made up of both men and women, you can use "彼ら." For example, 現代の若者たち、私には彼らの心理が解らない。 Today's youth, I cannot understand their psyche. 行楽地は中国人の男女で一杯だ。彼らの行動力も購買力も凄い。 The resort places are full of Chinese men and women. They are surprisingly active and demonstrate an enormous purchasing power. 番組は集団お見合いに参加した男女の姿を伝えたが、...


6

マイ○○ in katakana is very common in this context because we have been familiar with マイコンピュータ and マイドキュメント on the Windows desktop since the Windows 95 era. Using 私の instead doesn't sound cool to me. On the other hand アップ in katakana is not a good choice because アップ usually means up in Japanese. In katakanized English, up and app are read identically. アプリ is a ...


6

The verb ある is translated "be located", so there's usually little semantic difference between どこですか? and どこにありますか? This rule can be further extended to XはYにあります = XはYです for a thing X and location Y. 本は机の上にあります。 = 本は机の上です。 The book is on the desk. ジョンは秋葉原にいます。 = ジョンは秋葉原です。 John is in Akihabara. However, of course, the extended form ~にあります is ...


6

In general, あたし sounds casual or childish as compared to わたし. Unlike わたし, you should not use あたし in business settings. アタシヲアイシテ is written in katakana, which implies this particular line belongs to a different context. Have you ever seen an all-katakana sentence like this said by a yandere character or someone in a fury? In this case, アタシヲアイシテ represents ...


5

I'd say that this is the most common pronoun among college and older males I wouldn't say it's the most common one, but in a manly/friendly/aggressive environment you might encounter it. In real life speech it's not as common as 僕 and 私 since there are a lot less situations where you can use 俺 safely. It is used a lot on the internet, though. It's the most ...


5

It's common to use ちゃん regardless of their sex when they're are very small... roughly under 6 years old or so. http://oshiete.goo.ne.jp/qa/983087.html 平均的なところでは, ○未就学児は男女問わず「ちゃん」 ○小学生~高校生は男子が「君」,女子が「さん」 ○大学生以上の学生,社会人(18歳未満でも)は「さん」 ○ただし政治面など硬めのニュースでは男女問わず「氏」


5

Neither of those are common-use pronouns, but for different reasons - one isn't common-use, the other isn't a pronoun. I'll explain. 我が輩 is a relatively unusual first-person pronoun. It is used in exactly two contexts: When a male speaker wants to sound stuck-up and self-important - almost always in fiction, and often with noticeably more literary speech ...


5

Over on Linguistics.SE, there's a question about the difference between deixis and anaphora: What is the difference between “anaphora” and “deixis”? The linguist John Lawler posted a short comment there with a simple explanation. It's short, but in this case I think it tells you just about everything you need to know: Very simple distinction: First and ...


5

I appreciate the upvotes and I do not wish to delete my answer, but I think it's important to note that @psosuna 's answer about pronouns as a "scale of humility" is more relevant toward understanding why pronouns are used the way they are in Japanese. My answer is based on the "gender association" that I was taught in college and my personal experiences in ...


5

お母さん/お父さん and ママ/パパ are the common "first-person" pronouns at least when a child is small. See also: When referring to herself, is there any pronoun other than お母さん when speaking to her children? It's easy to find surveys on second-person usages of ママ/etc (for example this and this), but I could not find a survey directly on first-person ママ/etc. From my ...


5

The Japanese pronoun choice is quite context-dependent, but I can confidently pinpoint that this おまえ is "a way to address a junior family member". In this sense, it has no particularly masculine or feminine connotation, and is rather regarded as a conservative (or old-fashioned) usage in the present day (the younger generation is less likely to use ...


4

食べている人はいますか? Literally translated this means: "Are there people who are eating?" This basically means the same thing as "Is anyone eating?" The first translation is unnatural in colloquial English, while the second one would be the natural way to say it. Your attempt seems correct to me (minus the が). However, another interpretation of 誰でも could be "...


4

`Not everyone is here.' is translated into すべての人がここにいるのではない。 Here 「すべて~ではない」is a partial negation. `Everyne is not here' is translated into すべての人がここにいない。(i.e. 誰もいない) Here「すべて~ない」is a total negation. If you are familiar with formal language representations :-), We can interpret the above situation as below: When P(x)≡[x is here], Not everyone is here....


4

First, I'd like to explain the whole scheme concerning personal pronouns. You are supposed to use Standard Japanese when you speak in public or formal situations and in this case, you basically use 私 (derived from old Tokyo) only. Otherwise, you speak in a dialect of your own. In many areas including most populated ones, people speak New Tokyo dialect, ...


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