16

Can you say "日本語する"? I suppose you can use it idiomatically or somewhat playfully (perhaps akin to something like "I'm Japanese-ing it up"), but it's not a real verb that is used. If the answer is no, how can "日本語できる" be grammatically correct? Without realizing it, you are actually saying "日本語が分かることができます。". 日本語できる is really just dropping the が from ...


14

I'm a native speaker. The expressions of ことができる and ~られる are almost the same meaning. Don't think so difficult. You can use the expression you prefer. Examples: 雨が止んだら、テニスに行くことができるよ! 雨が止んだら、テニスに行けるよ! They have the same meaning. Both of them are used in daily life conversations. There is not the difference between the two sentences in my linguistic ...


12

Here's where 歩けなく comes from: Start with the verb 歩く, "to walk". Turn it into its potential form: 歩ける, "able to walk". Make it negative: 歩けない, "unable to walk". Turn the newly formed i-adjective into an adverb: 歩けなく. Now, なっちゃう is a shorter form of なって + しまう. なって, of course, is the -て form of なる, which means "to become". なる requires that the adjective ...


10

First of all, it should be 食べられる rather than 食べれる, although the latter form is used. See this link. Once you have conjugated a verb into the potential form it behaves just like any other iru-eru/group 1 (whatever you want to call it) verb. As you probably already know, to make a group 1 verb negative you just remove る and replace it with ない. So we get ...


10

滑る{すべる} is not a 'る' (ichidan) verb, but a godan verb. While it is true that all ichidan verbs end in いる or える, the reverse is not true; 入る{はいる} for example is a godan verb. 滑る conjugates as normal for godan: 滑って, 滑らない, 滑らせる etc. 滑られる is the passive form of 滑る.


8

見える To be visible, to be in sight. あそこに高{たか}い山{やま}が見える。 A tall mountain can be seen over there. 僕{ぼく}にはあなたが見える。 You are visible to me / I can see you. to look like. 僕にはその雲{くも}がわたあめに見える。 That cloud looks like cotton candy to me. 見える is about objects being visible and not so much about one's ability to to see them. Obviously, if an object is ...


8

After a bit of research I've tentatively convinced myself that this is the answer: わかります is acting as a passive verb 'to be known' rather than 'to know' or 'to understand'. In which case に is marking the agent of the action, so the sentence literally translates as 'the real young lord is known by me. Without に it would become 'I understand the real young ...


8

わかる is a potential verb. Potential verbs sometimes take に or には to contrast or emphasize their subjects. So 私にはわかります means ‘I know it while others probably do not.’ Examples are: 彼にできることなら私にもできる。 I can do what he can do. あなたに私の気持ちがわかる? Do you know how I feel? あの子には幽霊が見えるんだ。 That kid sees ghosts (while we don't).


8

In this case, the particle で denotes method/means ('by means of', 'with', 'using', etc.) The difference is 'speak in Japanese' vs 'speak Japanese'. 日本語で上手に話せます。 One can (speak / talk with someone / say something) well in Japanese. 日本語が上手に話せます。 One can speak Japanese well. (= One is a good Japanese speaker). When someone says 日本語で話す, it means ...


8

The short answer: You can think of です as performing several funcitons. Being a polite form of the copula だ, or being an auxiliary polite helper verb. です as a politeness helper verb: No you cannot say 来られるです. The polite present form of the verb is 来られます. You can only append です as a politeness helper for い-adjectives, so 来ないです is fine because ~ない is ...


7

According to Hamano and Tsujioka (2011), the difference between を and が with the potential form is that を has a slightly stronger sense of volition than が does. They give the examples A: 阿部さんは英語を話せます。 B: 阿部さんは英語が話せます。 and they translate both sentences as "Mr. Abe can speak English". According to their definition, sentence A has a stronger sense of Mr....


7

合える is the Potential conjugation of 合う。 Attaching ~ 合う (あう)to the end of a verb stem means to do the action with each other or to do the action mutually with someone else. (See more examples on the source page) Attaching 〜合う and 〜合える in this way is pretty common. To determine whether it would be fitting in a certain situation, a good rule of thumb is ...


7

Well, it appears to me that you're confused with the transitivity of 止まる. While the English word "stop" is used both transitively (as in "I stopped the taxi.") and intransitively (as in "Then the taxi stopped."), 止まる is always intransitive. The transitive version is 止める, and its potential form is 止められる. So 俺は止まらない just means "I don't stop" or "I will never ...


6

As pointed out in other answers, わかる is etymologically an potential/intransitive/passive verb of わける/わく. Then there are two questions: why cannot potential/passive/intransitive verbs have potential form. why the intransitive わかる is always used. how the potential form works Why cannot potential verbs have potential forms I have had this questions for years ...


6

''することができる'' isn't ill-advised at all. Generally, you can say ''(verb, dictionary form)~ことができる'' when someone can do something, of course you can say ''することができる''. You don't have to care about duplicating ''する''. There are many verbs like ''勉{べん}強{きょう}する'', ''質{しつ}問{もん}する'', etc. These ''する-form verb'' can be appended to ''ことができる'', such as ''...


6

According to Imabi Passive and the potential is impossible. ...Even if it does sound feasible, ~ことができる would be the closest match. ...Japanese doesn't allow grammatical items to be doubled next to each other, even if they are used for different things. ...The passive is natural intransitive. "To be able to (happen)" by nature is also intransitive. .....


6

Short answer: Verbs like 切れる can have two meanings, the potential one or the intransitive one. You determine by context. 上司が切れた In this case, it is clear the boss got mad. It could also be written as キレた. この紐、切れる? Here, it should be clear the person is asking "Can this string be cut?". This meaning can also be written as 〜切ることができる.


6

[帰]{かえ}れる is the potential form of 帰る. So this means "It's true, Hibiki. It's not that we just didn't come [or go] back, it's that we couldn't come back". Presumably the speaker is explaining to Hibiki that they and their companion[s] were prevented from coming home by force majeure - they didn't just decide not to of their own volition. The general rule for ...


6

Etymologically, various usages of れる/られる derived from one base meaning, "without someone's will". In modern Japanese, れる/られる is still sometimes used in this sense (known as 自発【じはつ】 or "spontaneous"). See: Why is the passive form used in this sentence? 故郷【こきょう】が思【おも】い出【だ】される。 I (spontaneously) remember my hometown. (I didn't intentionally ...


6

This is not the potential form of 持つ, but the 已然形 of 持つ plus the 終止形 of the 助動詞 り. In this case, the combination corresponds to modern Japanese 持っている.


5

I don't know what you mean by "-せる" form. -せる can appear at the end of the verb in at least two ways. As the potential form of a verb, which ends in -す. 帰す -> 帰せる As the causative form of a verb. 帰る -> 帰らせる Here, -せる is the potential form of the verb 倒す, so 倒す "to throw over, to knock down" 倒せる "to be able to throw over / knock down" 倒せない "not to ...


5

It's not conjugated like that, but it's an easy mistake to make :) The mistake you made was trying to convert a past tense word into a past potential word, when you have to do the reverse to make it work. That's to say, you need to convert a verb to its potential form and then turn that into its past. 食べる → 食べられる → 食べられた 飲む → 飲める → 飲めた


5

when the potential form of a verb is being used, direct object particle "を" should not be used. Instead, が or は should be used. That's not really correct; you can still use を naturally in many cases. See: The difference between が and を with the potential form of a verb. が or は should be used. So when should we use which? So do you know the standard ...


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