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9 votes
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「が」vs「の」 with possessives

が for possession was more common in old Japanese. But it's rare today and it only remains in proverbs (e.g. [人間]{にんげん}[万事]{ばんじ}[塞翁]{さいおう}が[馬]{うま}) and other fixed phrases. One exception is [我]{わ}が. ...
Faily Feely's user avatar
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6 votes
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The Quintessential Quintuplets: Is 'Koi no Summer Vacation' better translated as 'Love of Summer Vacation' instead of 'Summer Vacation of Love'?

The Japanese possessive / genitive particle [の]{no} works kinda "backwards" from the English preposition of. A of B A belongs to B → B owns A. A [の]{no} B A owns B → B belongs to A. It ...
Eiríkr Útlendi's user avatar
5 votes
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What is the basic underlying idea of ~がある?

why Japanese says the following? This is simply because we don't always need the nuance of "there is" or "there exists". This applies to all the four examples below. Compare these ...
Faily Feely's user avatar
  • 5,378
4 votes

What is the basic underlying idea of ~がある?

To go over the basics, as you already know: ある means "to exist", "there is" X がある means "there is a X" A (に)は B がある means what in English "A have a B" 私はアレックスという名前がある。 So this sentence means "I ...
broccoli forest's user avatar
4 votes
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Why isn't the verb "to have" common in Japanese and how do people phrase things without using it?

Do you have 5 dollars? Yes, thanks for asking. Not really what you meant to ask. I don't know how a Japanese person would actually respond if you asked: 5ドル持っていますか But I'm sure it would be more ...
user3856370's user avatar
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4 votes
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How do you differentiate between "I have" and "There is"?

You've asked two different questions here, but I'm going to try and answer both of them. First of all, in regard to how to say "because you are mine", the very literal translation would be something ...
Mindful's user avatar
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3 votes
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Having trouble parsing out 「私は今までの私ではない」

Parse 私は - I 今までの私 - The person I used to be (until now/just recently) ではない - am not Roughly translated I am not the person I used to be. Side note For parsing sentences, a useful tool is ...
Otomatonium's user avatar
3 votes
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興味を持っている vs 興味がある

興味を持っている is equivalent to "have an interest in sth." 興味がある is eqivalent to "be interested in sth." Both are saying the same thing.
Yoichi Oishi's user avatar
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3 votes
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why は and not の?

Basically, you should think of this as a set construct. XはYがZ. Of course, Z can be anything, not just an i-adjective, but in general when you see this construct, you should interpret it as: ...
ArchAlessus's user avatar
3 votes
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Do possessive pronouns exist at all in Japanese or the only way to refer to possession is through the "no" particle?

我【わ】が is almost recognized in modern Japanese as a fixed single word that means my. が was a possession marker like の in old Japanese, but this meaning has dropped out of use. Modern dictionaries ...
naruto's user avatar
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2 votes

Having trouble parsing out 「私は今までの私ではない」

I think の here is a nominalizer, converting 今まで (until now) into a noun phrase which then modifies the second 私, resulting in 今までの私 ("me until now", i.e. "the person I used to be"). Combining it ...
Igor Skochinsky's user avatar
2 votes

興味を持っている vs 興味がある

It's just my opinion, I guess that a subject is different among those two sentences. For example: 私は[疑問]{ぎもん}を持っている I have a question. 私は疑問がある →私(に)は疑問がある There is a question in my mind The latter ...
nariuji's user avatar
  • 818
2 votes
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Is there any difference between ~~をする and ~が~

They are almost the same. However, when they mean that her eyes happen to be unusually blue in the moment, the latter 目が青い is more likely to be used.
user4092's user avatar
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2 votes
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彼女には心配事がない。why there is に?

に means "to" or "for" and in this case 彼女には has the sense of "In her case" or "as for her" but can simply be translated as "she has" (or rather "doesn't have", since it ends with a negative).
ericfromabeno's user avatar
2 votes

The Quintessential Quintuplets: Is 'Koi no Summer Vacation' better translated as 'Love of Summer Vacation' instead of 'Summer Vacation of Love'?

It's "The Summer Vacation of Love" "Love of Summer Vacation" feels awkward and clunky. Like "BCLC-san no Inu" means "The dog of BCLC-san" /"BCLC-san's Dog&...
4chan user's user avatar
1 vote
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When can I get away with implying the の possessive?

Apposition without の (i.e. …子ヨナ) sounds fairly formal, or could be theatrical or narrative, compared with the one with it (…子のヨナ). So, you will do it when you want that rhetorical effect.
user4092's user avatar
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1 vote

Why isn't the verb "to have" common in Japanese and how do people phrase things without using it?

Apparently motsu is simply not as common in Japanese as to have is in English, or avoir in French, and so on. This is to be expected, because it simply doesn't cover the same range of meaning. In ...
Karl Knechtel's user avatar
1 vote

How do you differentiate between "I have" and "There is"?

「君がいるから」would mean 'Because you are (with me).' If you want to say 'Because you are mine', you could say: 君が俺/僕/私のものだから。 This could sound a bit macho and possessive though. As far as specifying '...
BJCUAI's user avatar
  • 7,220
1 vote

why は and not の?

は emphasizes that the sentance applies to him in particular and not somebody else. The sentence relates to the conversation topic of him. 彼は歯が白い. Consists of the first part ''彼は'':''As for him in ...
Dylano Stewart Rodrigues's user avatar
1 vote
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possessive の with a verb

Hopefully I will be able to clarify this to you. The の between 私 and 作った絵 makes perfect sense if you look at the verb as you would look at a modifier/adjective. Few examples: 買った本 - book that was ...
tamotsumono's user avatar
1 vote

What is the basic underlying idea of ~がある?

~がある generally means 'there exists' or 'there is.' To use your examples: ~事{こと}がある ~ has happened. or ~ happens on occasion. ~必要{ひつよう}がある There is a need to ~. or It is necessary to ~. ~傾向{けいこう}...
KT12's user avatar
  • 238

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