16

It's not common at all and I don't remember whether I've heard it in my entire life, but ありがとうございません is not gibberish, and it could pass as a meaningful wordplay to describe ありがた迷惑 if used in an appropriate situation. "Thanks but no thanks" could be usable in an ordinary conversation, but ありがとうございません is a pure joke and it's never used when you are truly ...


11

While it’s not impossible to interpret, it is unusual (far more than “thanks, but no thanks”). This is mainly because the grammatical construction of 〜うございます is mostly no longer productive and ありがとうございます is completely lexicalized, so you’re doing something odd to the end of a word. Similar to だいじょばない, perhaps. You could imagine this being used by an anime ...


9

何それ? is not necessarily rude, but it is certainly informal. As such, it should probably only be used with friends or family or in an informal environment. Using it outside those boundaries might risk it sounding somewhat brusque or perhaps even rude. A standard polite alternative is: それは何ですか。 What is that?


5

A very standard and polite way of asking permission for something in Japanese is to use the construction VERBてもいいですか. See these answers for reference: Why でも is used rather than も in this sentence? 貸してもいいですか versus 借りてもいいですか In your sentence, you could use this construction and say: 質問してもいいですか。 May I ask a question?   For an even more polite version, you ...


5

パパ, お父さん, 僕, and 俺 are used when the children are young. パパ is less used when they become adults. But お父さん, 僕, and 俺 are still used when they become adults. Switching their personal pronoun doesn’t always occur, but I think 僕 and 俺 rarely change to パパ and お父さん. パパ and お父さん has an air of viewing their children as kids, though many fathers call themselves パパ ...


5

The fact that he is a robot is not important. Close friends and family members do not use くん/さん at all when they call one another. At classrooms, English-based names may resist くん/さん earlier because everyone knows it's not used outside Japan. Generally, mass media do not use くん/さん to address a celebrity, active sport player, etc (there are complicated house ...


5

お母さん/お父さん and ママ/パパ are the common "first-person" pronouns at least when a child is small. See also: When referring to herself, is there any pronoun other than お母さん when speaking to her children? It's easy to find surveys on second-person usages of ママ/etc (for example this and this), but I could not find a survey directly on first-person ママ/etc. From my ...


5

Asking a question is a very complicated transaction. In theory the questioner is lowering themself - the reason they are asking the question is because they don't know the answer. But the questioner is also imposing on the other: they could be seen to be demanding a response. If the other doesn't know the answer, then they will have to display their ...


4

When expressions are shortened, they are usually considered less formal and thus sound less polite. This applies to では vs. じゃ: じゃ is less formal and thus sounds less polite (but can sound more friendly). Other common examples include: しては vs. しちゃ, している vs. してる, しておく vs. しとく, してしまう vs. しちゃう, すれば vs. すりゃ, しなければ vs. しなきゃ.


4

Unsurprisingly, a sudden switch to polite speech or keigo usually means a psychological distance, anger or a serious mood. However, if a couple uses keigo on a daily basis, that's another story. Traditionally, the concept of gender role was much more prevailing than today in Japan, and it was not uncommon for a wife to use keigo to her husband. In Sazae-san,...


4

If you are working and they are a customer, then お[客]{きゃく}さま is a pretty normal way to refer to someone. Also in many contexts, お[兄]{にい}さん お[姉]{ねえ}さん お[父]{とう}さん お[母]{かあ}さん おじさん おばさん おじいさん おばあさん function as ways to address people when you don't know depending on the person's age. But perhaps the most common way to get someone's attention is すみません ...


4

Disclaimer: I am by no means an expert, and am actually still learning Japanese myself, but I have been interested in these subjects for quite a long time myself, so these are my own observations (I welcome any corrections by more knowledgeable folks): When polite speech (です/ます/etc) is used and when it's not can be a very complex and subtle matter. New ...


4

I would say what you were told is partly correct but partly wrong. You should use a 謙譲語 verb いたします in business settings. But you can safely add ご/お to a 連絡 from yourself. Saying ご連絡いたします is perfectly fine. ご/お as a prefix often forms a 尊敬語, but it sometimes forms a mere 美化語, too. ご連絡 is not a 尊敬語 but a 美化語, and you can safely use 美化語 to refer to things ...


3

お伝えする, お伺いする, ご説明する and so on are humble expressions, but お願いする is not humble, even though it looks similar! This お願い is more or less a fixed noun/suru-verb meaning "(to make) a request". 願う is just "to hope" without an explicit target person. There are similar fixed nouns with fixed meanings in the form of お + stem (お握り, お絞り, お座り, お使い, お漏らし, ...). 願い is a ...


2

EDIT: sorry, I've rechecked the episode, and he says おはようじゃない. Still negation of a common aisatsu, just not a keigo-negation. The translation stands, though. Not quite the same, but I've heard "ohayou gozaimasu" followed by "ohayou gozaimasen!!!" in an anime. The second character was obviously trying to convey extreme displeasure with the circumstances, ...


2

Taking your suggestions in turn: 「サインをください。」 sounds a bit demanding; it would be understood, but you can be more polite. 「サインをお願いしますか。」 is not natural, as お願いします is referring to your own wish; the か at the end rather thus confuses the nature of your wish. I would probably go with: 「サインをいただけますか。」 -- literally meaning: "Could I get/receive your autograph?". ...


2

They have a different nuance, and お互い doesn't mean "us" but "each other". 僕たち and 僕等 are almost the same, I feel 僕等 is a bit casual. 我々 is a bit exaggerated, so it is not often used in daily conversation but in lofty and exaggerated speeches.


2

At the very simplest level, regardless of whether talking about your own or others' actions, it is best to stick to ます・です style if you want to be polite. It does not sound stuck up if the politeness is appropriate, but it might sound distant (so, potentially aloof/stuck up as a result?) if you (continually) use it when speaking to friends. That said, it ...


2

This is functionally same as this one: What exactly is this でね construction? で is usually used to connect to phrases, but when the speaker is too excited about the first part already, s/he wants to affirm it with ね. Except that: verb's te-form is used here, which is equivalent to noun/na-adj. + で (duh) has です in the middle The seemingly dislocated です is ...


1

お願いします is a standard, set phrase. It has nothing to do with politeness. It is "I humbly request" or "please". Or, it was at once polite, but has now since just become an average grammar phrase when you ask someone for something.


1

While grammatically correct, it sounds completely unnatural because it's never used in practice. Someone hearing this will definitely think you are playing with words, distorting ありがとうございます as part of a joke, probably to mean you are not thankful, but it depends on the context. It's pretty non standard so using it to try to convey "thanks, but no thanks" ...


1

Directly: 呼び捨ててください。 呼び捨てでいい(です)。 呼び捨てで構いません。 Note: in the first case 呼び捨てて is a verb in the latter 呼び捨て is a noun. Otherwise it sounds a bit more natural without using the phrase 呼び捨て itself, so depending on context and your level of closeness with the other person: ジョンと呼んでください。さんは不要です。 さんをつけることありませんよ、ジョンと呼んでください。 さんは使わなくてもいい(です)。 さんをつけなくてもいい(です)。 さんではなく、...


1

謙譲語 は humble form。 It is used while speaking to the superior by humble ourself. Instead of giving respect to the superior by humble ourself it will automatically give respect to the superior. しますはいたします。  勉強します - 勉強いたします。 お願いします - お願いいたします。 目上の人と話すとき使います。


1

サインをください isn’t used so much. サインください is better. And both are used more often by a delivery person. I write here some examples you can use when you want his autograph. サイン(を)頂くことって可能ですか? サイン(を/って)頂いてもよろしいですか? サイン(を)して頂いてもいいですか? サイン(を)頂けませんか? サイン(って)頂けますか? サイン(を/って)貰うことってできますか? サイン(って)して貰っても大丈夫ですか? サイン(って)して貰ってもいいですか? サイン(って)貰えますか? サイン(って)大丈夫ですか? サインいいですか? ...


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