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9

Does this class of words have a name? I don't think so. Do words like "banana" and "indivisibility" have a special name in English? Are these words more poetic in a way? As wordplay, a poem that contains many such words may exist somewhere, but it's not popular at all. Are there other, longer, words like this that I missed? Japanese ...


8

I suspect this might be an example of poetic license or even contraction. Note that all of the 思ふ instances above follow on another mora from the お行, leaving open the possibility that をしと思{おも}ふ, for example, was actually read as をしともふ, thus producing the expected mora count. I note too that 思う has a pitch pattern of おもう{LHL}, making the お effectively ...


7

There is always trade-off, as you said. Thus naturally we have both approaches, depending on what policy and objective you have. Your #1 is called 訓読 ("interpretative reading") in Japanese, and considered normal. As it is a form of literal translation, you can relatively easily get the meaning, at the cost of original prosody. Fortunately, Japanese verse ...


6

This article seems to show what the original poem is like. われにな問ひそ今の世と The original text goes like this. The な V そ sandwich (V takes 連用形 except for す and 来 become 未然形, せ and こ) is a common Classical pattern for negative imperative "please don't", which is given a detailed explanation in Japanese dictionary. われは明治の兒ならずや negative + 係助詞 や (no particular ...


6

[Disclaimer: This might crush your dream.] First of all, here are the facts - if I can trust Wiki, that is. The haiku in question could not have been written by 佐々木禎子{ささきさだこ}. Why not? That is because Sasaki died in 1955 and the statue was completed in 1958 to commemorate Sasaki and other kids. Sasaki simply could not have written a poem inspired by the ...


6

Yes, this 4-4-5 (or 4-4-7) rhythm has a nice ring (語呂がいい) to the ears of Japanese. Nicopedia even maintains a list of words which happen to have such 4-4-5 beats. Kitahara Hakushu's あめんぼの歌 is one of the best-known poems which uses this pattern throughout the lines. The lyrics of the theme song of 水戸黄門 (video; full lyrics) follow this 4-4-5 pattern. ...


6

The や indicates 詠嘆・感動 (exclamation/admiration). It's categorized as a 間投助詞 (interjectory particle) in デジタル大辞泉: や 四 間助 3 詠嘆・感動の意を表す。 「いで、あな幼なや」〈源・若紫〉 「夏草やつはものどもが夢の跡/芭蕉」〈奥の細道〉 And 明鏡国語辞典 categorizes it as a 終助詞 (final particle): や (三)〘終助〙 ❸ 詠嘆を表す。「これはすごいや」「ああ、恐ろしや、恐ろしや」「高く泳ぐや鯉のぼり〈鯉のぼり〉」◇俳句の切れ字もこれ。「古池や[蛙]{かはづ}飛び込む水の音〈芭蕉〉」


5

This や is a literary particle used to add emotion or exclamation. It's common in in haiku and waka. It works like O as in "O the ancient pond", or ... as in "The ancient pond...". Note that や has several roles. See jisho.org (the 4th definition) and the following question: What grammatical function is や performing here?


5

Background The first thing to be aware of is that this poem was composed in Chinese by the poet 于 濆 (Yú Fén) in roughly 874. (Brief Chinese Wikipedia article about the poet here.) As such, the Japanese version must be viewed as a translation. And if you've ever done much translation yourself, particularly of poetry, you've probably come to understand ...


5

Some haiku do not strictly follow the 5-7-5 pattern. Irregular haiku with one more or less morae than usual are called 字余り or 字足らず, respectively. Some haiku even ignore the 5-7-5 rule completely (See 自由律俳句). Wikipedia says 一茶's haiku do have many variations: 最も多くの俳句を残したのは、正岡子規で約24,000句であるが、一茶の句は類似句や異形句が多いため、数え方によっては、子規の句数を上回るかもしれない。よく知られている「我と来て遊べや親のない雀」...


5

Follow might be a slightly misleading verb here, because it is too narrow, and can sometimes have a negative connotation of passivity. There's a difference between seeking my mother's advice and following it. I noticed how “seek to follow the footsteps” is the widely disseminated translation for this quote, but literally it is more like a simple “seek the ...


4

I would say this is a problem of both "the old grammar/words" and "the old orthography". A spelling reform (such as the German orthography reform of 1996) and archaic word usage are two different things, although they are closely related. Technically speaking, you can rewrite today's news articles using the old orthography. たまふ in 君死にたまふことなかれ is an ...


4

The reason why such a pattern appears is, as currently understood, that Japanese was not a mora-timed language yet at the time 古今和歌集 was compiled. Until around the 16th century, meters were counted by syllable, or in other words, by the number of vowel clusters. That makes adjacent vowels in a continuation can be freely merged into one unit, and a bare ...


4

「しゅるる」 is an onomatopoeia that describes, in this case, the sound made by the toilet paper rolling. The variants include 「しゅるしゅる」、「シュルシュル」、「シュルル」, etc. Onomatopoeias are an important part of our language and that is such an understatement. Onomatopoeias rule.


4

I think these are basically coincidences, although they may not be total coincidences because related words tend to share the same radical anyway (愛 and 恋 both have 心, for example). Normally, Japanese lyricists do not care about kanji radicals as English speakers try to rhyme lines. Of course there should be some poets who intentionally tried to do this as a ...


3

Those tanka are all overly "artistic", almost a showcase of unexpected words or combinations that make each poem hard to follow in meaning. (Each poem is divided in lines for easier understanding.) 濃い夏の / その濃さゆえの / 濃い顔の / ナチュラルメイク / こそぎとりてえ 濃い: it has many meanings; among I think less likely to be taught ones is "dense in information" (...


3

1) Is 「身世」 a single word, or are they two different words? Two separate words. 「わが身{み}」 is the first-person pronoun. 「世{よ}」 means "the/this world".   2) If they are two different words, then which verb goes with 「わが身」? Is it 「ふる」 or 「せし」? It goes primarily with 「ふる」 and secondarily with 「ながめせし」. "got old while gazing" 3) Is it correct that I ...


3

Rhyme hasn't had much presence through the history of Japanese poetry, so you can say that Japanese poetry is virtually built on blank verses. The underlying meter of traditional Japanese poetry style, or 和歌 (waka) is, as @user4092 has pointed out, the repetition of 5-7 cycles based on quadruple measures. The word 短歌 (tanka; 5-7-5-7-7) literally means "...


3

The 5-7-5 pattern is musically perceived as 5 quavers, 3 eighth rests, 7 quavers, one eighth rest and 5 quavers, making the 4/4 rhythm. example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lps7EaIPEAA


3

Japanese doesn't traditionally use spaces, so a space will indicate a line break. For example, 八雲立つ 出雲八重垣 妻籠みに 八重垣作る その八重垣を Which, if choose to write it in rōmaji, is Yakumo tatsu / Izumo yaegaki / Tsuma-gomi ni / Yaegaki tsukuru / Sono yaegaki wo I will say, however, texts containing poems would almost always be written vertically, so the need to write ...


2

You are encountering here the difference between modern spelling and the spelling used prior to WWII. まふ is the old spelling for もう You can find other examples here. I cannot explain the meaning of the old Japanese. I am unable to decipher its grammar. But in this situation, this is a case of differing orthography from an earlier period.


2

One example of a block of text which is fully understandable both vertically and horizontally, is from this comedy. (And I'm afraid I know nothing more complex or sophisticated than this.) 極秘情報 (Top Secret) performed by アンジャッシュ https://youtu.be/n5JfsbM89v8 ワタシ カツラ ナノダ シカモ ゲイ○ "モ○" at the bottom right is actually a kanji number 一七〇 (170) written vertically,...


2

I offer my translation, made thanks to the community. Note: the names mentioned by the poet Nagai -- Dangiku, Ochi, Ichiyo, Koyo, Ryokuu, Encho, Shicho, Ryuson and Ogai Gyoshi -- were all contemporary poets, performers and figures of the Meiji period. For some of them, Nagai describes their falling into oblivion punningly, in a manner befitting their names. ...


2

Probably due to Kuroshio's strong current, they improve transportation of heat and things. The lyricist wanted to encourage troops mentioning 黒潮. My interpretation is the following : 寄せる黒潮 何と見る The Kuroshio is forthcoming, how do you feel about that?(Why don't you get stoked!?) It sounds like a typical phrase of rock concert like Metallica. Possibly 陸軍{...


2

So I'm assuming you're trying to express the beautiful redness of 紅葉. In general, 巡り itself is a nice word that is suitable for poetry, but it's strongly associated with "cycling" (i.e. "red, blue, yellow, red, blue, ...", "north, south, north, south, ..." or "winter, spring, summer, fall, winter, ..."). 葉の巡り is not something we usually say, and it's ...


2

The best answer that I could find was this answer on Yahoo.jp 知恵袋, which goes: 「てふ」→(ハ行転呼)→「てう」 「てう」→(拗長音化)→「チョー(表記は「ちょう」)」 頭語以外の「はひふへほ」を原則「わいうえお」にする というのは「ハ行転呼」ですが、 これが起こった上で、さらに発音が変化して 「チョー(ちょう)」になっています。 「けふ(今日)」→「きょう」、 「きふ(急)」→「きゅう」、 なども、同じことが起きています。 ハ行転呼 拗長音


2

As far as parsing goes, my brain is intuitively seeing three "sentences" in this verse. 唐突に始まるお前の昔話(を)聞きながら、アルペジオ。 【{(冴えないノンフィクションの結末)を握っている→}お前の手】は、冷たいから嫌だ。 {(やさぐれ吐く息)に混じる声}が、歌い出す。 Note: Some verb after アルペジオ is omitted. What's omitted is a very hard question for me. One easy option is to extract the アルペジオ part as a sentence word (like "Parsley sage ...


1

It's usually written in classical Japanese or kanbun kundoku. But be aware that Yamato-kotoba is not the same as classical Japanese. Typical 詩吟 pieces have many Sino-Japanese words. Mixing 詩吟 and modern Japanese may be technically possible but I haven't heard of something like that. It's perhaps like mixing Shakespeare's English and hip-hop. 詩吟 is a ...


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